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More Hurdles for UWS Sliver Building; Co-op Board Meeting Season

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1) The aspiring developer of 330 West 86th Street thought he had finally had a breakthrough in April when the Board of Standards and Appeals approved his plans after 11 years. But now the building is facing its next set of challengers, including elected officials, the Department of Buildings, and the Department of Housing. We'll be checking back on this one again in 2021. ['Slim chance for builder'/NYP]

2) Jane Lauder (Estée Lauder's granddaughter) moved to a $12.63 million penthouse in Nolita five years ago without ever fully ditching her UES penthouse. She's finally put the co-op, at Park Avenue and 76th Street, on the market for $8.9 million. That ask gets you a 1BR with a library. [Big Deal/'Jane Lauder Apartment for Sale']

3) This week's hunter couple wanted their first shared apartment to be a $1,600 1BR in Williamsburg or Greenpoint. But that turned out to mean rather hideous and dark railroad apartments. But one of those railroads had two closets, was slightly less dark than the others, and was only $1,450. Rented! [The Hunt/'The Major-Step-in-Life Apartment']
4) It's co-op board meeting season, which means it's time to talk about all the reasons why co-op boards don't have as much money as they all wish they did. The main reason: tax increases, thanks to the fact that assessments from 2006, the market peak, are only now being phased in to tax bills. In retaliation, many buildings are upping flip taxes, move-in, and renovation fees. ['What to Expect From the Annual Co-op Meeting']

5) That mortgage not going through? Blame the building! As buyers try to jump into the market while the jumping's good, they're running up against Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac restrictions on buildings where more than 20 percent of the building is commercial space or the sponsor owns a large percentage of the property. Advice to buyers in this situation: get mortgages from somewhere else. [Mortgages/'Blame the Building if the Mortgage Falls Through']