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Vintage Photos of the Fulton Fish Market in its Glory Days

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Since the Fulton Fish Market moved to Hunt's Point in 2005, the original buildings along the East River in the South Street Seaport have sat empty, falling into disrepair. What once housed the biggest and most important wholesale fish market in the U.S. has functioned as a makeshift parking lot for nearly seven years, but now, thanks to the New Amsterdam Market, the historic site has a chance to return to its origins. In a recent Times op-ed, the market organizers made the case for saving the Fulton Fish Market:

Currently the historic market sheds are victims of a kind of planned forgetfulness, lost in bureaucratic limbo that could lead to outright abandonment at best, eventual demolition at worst. What better use for these iconic waterfront structures than to house a permanent market to nurture and support small, innovative businesses dedicated to regional food systems? Tonight, these folks will present their official proposal to Community Board 1 for restoring the buildings and creating a new wholesale market. In light of their plans for the future, we took a look back at what the market used to be?here now is a collection of historic photos showing the Fulton Fish Market in its glory days. The Fulton Fish Market opened in 1822 near the Brooklyn Bridge on South Street between Beekman and Fulton Streets. The market primarily functioned in two open air sheds, known as the Tin Building and the New Market Building, which are the structures that the New Amsterdam Market hopes to save. By adaptively reusing the structures to create a modern day market, New Amsterdam wants to bring small businesses, culture, and community back to the Seaport, something that Howard Hughes' plans for a shiny new retail center on Pier 17 likely will not do.
· New Amsterdam Market [official website]
· Fulton Fish Market coverage [Curbed]
· South Street Seaport coverage [Curbed]
· Museum of the City of New York photo collections [mcny.org]