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One Possibility For NYC's Vacant Office Space: Pop-Up Hotels

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Danish architecture collective PinkCloud has created an extensive proposal that it believes would solve Midtown Manhattan's vacant office space problem. Too many offices lie empty, so why can't that space be put towards something useful, something that people actually use/need/pay money for... like pop-up hotels? As evidenced by the masses of renderings below, initially spotted by Architizer, PinkCloud envisions these temporary structures as being prefabricated and modular in such a way that a hotel owner or even a guest could pick and choose which amenities and facilities were necessary, from a hostel-style setup with bunk beds to luxury suites. The design firm describes it as comparable to "ordering from a restaurant menu, one can pick and choose from a wide variety of experiences... Everything the hotel needs is easily packed and shipped on site with our very own modular shipping containers!" After the components are ordered and delivered by truck, each marked with an identifying QR codes, they are pieced together to create lobbies, pools, bathrooms, bedrooms, and more.

"The Pop-Up Hotel is designed to be a means of urban revitalization, an economic catalyst, as well as an active community partner," PinkCloud enthuses. The concept beat out 70 other entries and won them $10,000 in the 7th annual Radical Innovation in Hospitality Competition, which took place in May and is organized by The John Hardy Group and Hospitality Design magazine. We love the spirit of their invention, but if you take a look at the images below, we think they've got quite a ways to go. Renderings that look like collages made from magazine clippings likely need a bit more thought they become reality. Cool idea, though, so check out their designs. And keep dreaming big!


· Official: Pop Up Hotel [PinkCloud]
· Pop-Up Hotel Concept Hopes To Solve Manhattan Real Estate Woes [Architizer]
· More New York hotels coverage [Curbed]