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Inside Bette Midler's 'Divine,' Verdant Fifth Avenue Penthouse

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The triplex penthouse belonging to actress, singer, and activist Bette Midler is, unsurprisingly, as divine as Miss M herself. She let Architectural Digest tour her Upper East Side digs, which boast stellar views of Central Park and gorgeously lush, landscaped wraparound terraces overrun with flowers. That's no shocker, either, given that bonafide belter is also the founder of a (literally) green nonprofit, the 20-year-old New York Restoration Project, which builds and maintains parks and community gardens across the city. More on the outside bits in a moment, but as for the inside, it's a combo that was put together and renovated by Los Angeles-based Frederick Fisher. A vibrant mish-mash of styles, there's everything from ruffled lampshades to contemporary art courtesy of collector/investor husband Martin von Haselberg, from ebony-colored furnishings by Austrian architect Josef Hoffmann to an Art Deco carpet procured in Paris. That casual blending probably contributes to the home's pointedly non-sleek-and-celeb-y vibe, which AD dubs "the coziness of a well-loved country house."

Midler worked with New York-based designer Fernando Santangelo to decorate the interiors. However, landscape guru Brian Sawyer is responsible for the "Edenic" garden out on the many terraces, in which "[s]hell-pink 'Alchemist' roses and aubergine clematises clamber up brick walls, and foxgloves sway above emerald hostas."

Voila, a terrace with a view. See the reservoir? And AD's June cover, featuring another shot of Midler's outdoor space. The floor surface is alternating squares of turf and limestone. For more photos, check out Arch Digest's slideshow.

[Bette Midler in her living room. Photo via Architectural Digest/William Waldron.]

· Bette Midler's Lush Manhattan Penthouse And Garden [AD]
· All New York Restoration Project coverage [Curbed]
· Adventures in Interior Design archive [Curbed]
· Celebrity Real Estate archive [Curbed]