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Park Slope 'Wreck' Gets Renovated Into Badly Named Condos

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A once-handsome building at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Second Street in Park Slope is currently graffiti-covered and scaffolding-shrouded—but not for long. Developer Sugar Hill Capital Partners, which bought the site for $4.2 million when it was nearly in foreclosure, chose not to raze the five-story building (thanks?) but is instead in the midst of a restoration that will result in four full-floor three-bedroom condos, with retail space on the ground floor. It shall have the rather terrible name 2ND7TH. Apparently, bringing a dilapidated structure up to code, and luxury-buyer standards, is pretty hard. Cleaning and replacing bricks, parapet issues, turret troubles, et al. You know. "We really appreciated the architecture of Park Slope and didn't want to knock down this building to build some glass tower or structure that stands out," Sugar Hill's Jeremy Salzburg told the Times.

Even though there aren't any live listings for the development, the four condos are slated to be complete in the fall and are actually for sale now from $3.2 million. The penthouse apartment, which has a private roof deck, will ask $3.5 million.

More on the interiors:

One artistic liberty the architects are taking with the facade is to install floor-to-ceiling glass windows in the turret and bay windows. The turret will have louvers to keep interior temperatures comfortable. ... The three-bedroom condos are being created with flexible layouts, meaning bedrooms can be added or removed easily, he said. Many of the rooms have 10-foot ceilings and European wide oak plank floors, and the living room has a gas fireplace flanked by travertine slabs. ... Amenities for all residents include a roof deck with Manhattan views, a summer kitchen and cabanas; a virtual doorman; and private and common storage in the basement. Seems The House That Whimsy Built... is just going to become another set of fancy condos. Yay or nay?
· Restoring a Park Slope Wreck [NYT]
· Dilapidated Park Slope Building Getting Converted to Condos [Curbed]