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Inside a Warm, Modern 19th-Century Tribeca Loft

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Photo by Daniel Shea courtesy Dwell.

On Saturday, five private Manhattan homes were open to the public as part of Dwell on Design New York, an interior-focused event sponsored by Dwell magazine. Among them was a 2,000-square-foot loft on White Street in Tribeca, which was noteworthy for its use of repurposed materials, including the building's original windows and ceiling. The 19th-century space was given a facelift by James Ramsey of RAAD Studio (he's also known as one of the driving forces behind the Lowline). When converting the historic loft, Ramsey considered it "important to treat as much of the historical shell that remained intact with reverence," which is reflected in the mix of old and new found throughout.

[Photo by Daniel Shea courtesy Dwell.]

The loft has space for three bedrooms, one of which is currently being used as a nursery. There are two full bathrooms (one of which is shared by the second and third bedrooms), along with a powder room. Salvaged and recycled materials can be found throughout: The loft's original tin ceiling, for example, found new life in the master bedroom, where it was turned into an accent wall behind the bed. Meanwhile, doors that conceal the master bathroom's shower and toilet were created from the building's windows. And one of the most interesting elements is the wine rack in the kitchen, which was repurposed from terra cotta pipes.

[Photo by Daniel Shea courtesy Dwell.]

[Photo by Daniel Shea courtesy Dwell.]

Other pieces throughout the apartment reflect the owners' eclectic tastes: There's a giant skeleton of a Beluga whale suspended over the dining room table; a vintage carousel horse is perched in the middle of the living room; and there are artworks that reference New York City throughout. Ramsey wanted to keep the color palette "warm yet modern," which can be seen in the kitchen, where a sleek black sink and countertops are balanced by white subway-tile walls, and a marble-and-wood island.

[Photo by Daniel Shea courtesy Dwell.]

The living room is long and narrow, but rather than feeling "cave-like…[which] plagues so many similar lofts," it's bright, with windows shedding light, and a balance of furniture and other decorative elements that keeps it from feeling too claustrophobic. Check out more photos of the space below.


—Evan Bindelglass is a local freelance journalist, photographer, cinephile, and foodie. You can e-mail him, follow him on Twitter @evabin, or check out his personal blog.
· RAAD Studio [Official]
· Dwell on Design New York [Official]