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Robert A.M. Stern's 30 Park Place reveals its posh amenities

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Inside one of the Financial District’s tallest towers, which just unveiled its swanky amenity spaces

A swimming pool. There are multiple lounge chairs on the side of the pool.
The pool at 30 Park Place

You might think that there isn’t any part of 30 Park Place, the Financial District tower designed by Robert A.M. Stern, that we haven’t explored yet. We’ve gone inside both a 70th-floor model unit and a 78th-floor duplex penthouse that comes with a double-height loggia; we’ve also explored the Four Seasons Downtown, the hotel that occupies the first few floors of the building.

But there’s still one part of the building that has yet to be revealed: the swank amenities, which offer perks for both Four Seasons guests and residents of the high-end condos above it. The amenity space occupies the skyscraper’s 38th floor, and was only recently completed—and Curbed got a peek inside.

The building’s amenities are fairly standard, at least for a super-high-end condo: there’s a children’s playroom, a screening room, a common area (which they’re calling “the conservatory”) with outdoor spaces, and a private dining room. Stern’s firm was responsible for the interiors of these spaces, which are quite nice; there’s even a baby grand piano, should inspiration strike residents.

There’s also a fitness center that comes with a yoga studio, and—crucially, if you’re the type of person who gets bored easily on a treadmill—stunning views of Lower Manhattan.

In fact, the whole space has amazing views: There are two terraces that hug the common room, with views of the World Trade Center on one side and an eye-level view of the Woolworth Building on the other.

Considering the building’s pedigree, it’s not too surprising that the amenity spaces are super posh. (What else would you expect if you’re paying, at a minimum, about $3.5 million for a home?) The shared spaces include the pool and spa, both of which are part of the Four Seasons but can be accessed by both hotel guests and residents (there’s a private entrance for the latter, naturally).

Designed by Yabu Pushelberg, the pool and spa match the overall tone of the hotel: The materials are luxurious (marble, travertine, European oak), in rich but muted neutral tones. The overall effect is meant to give the space an air of “soothing tranquility,” according to Pushelberg.

The building also recently unveiled a sculpture by glass artist Martin Blank, which sits in a courtyard between 30 Park Place and the low-rise structure that holds its mechanicals. The courtyard is a privately owned public space, and in warmer months, there may be events and even food trucks that’ll be open to the public.

Martin Blank’s Steam Portraits, in the courtyard next to 30 Park Place

30 Park Place

30 Park Place, New York, NY