clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Greenwich Village Federal-style townhouse dating to 1829 seeks $12M

New, 7 comments

The charming townhouse on West 10th Street last sold in 2004 for $4.7M

Courtesy of Corcoran

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in March 2017 and has been updated with the most recent information.

UPDATE (8/3/17): Danny Bennett sold his Greenwich Village Federal-style townhouse for $1.5 million below its ask, the New York Post has learned. Tony Bennett’s son listed it on the market for $12 million this past March. Though he got less than what he wanted, it’s still significantly more than he paid for the townhouse back in 2004.


It may look petite from the outside, but the Federal-style townhouse at 48 West 10th Street packs a surprising amount of space, and history, behind its charming facade. The townhouse dates back to 1829, and was built for James Roselle according to the 1969 designation report for the Greenwich Village Historic District, in which no. 48 falls.

Although its facade elements look antique, some of them are not original to the house. The designation report notes that its charming mansard roof, pedimented dormers, and central skylight were added in 1871 in an alteration commissioned by society lady and dressmaker Sarah C. Clarke. (For those doing the math, this means the alterations are nearly 150 years old—nothing to scoff at.) The property was most recently purchased in 2004 for $4.7 million by one D’Andrea Benedetto, presumably the son of Tony Bennett. (Corcoran has declined to comment.)

Despite its history, the house’s interiors are thoroughly modern. The house packs in over 5,600 square feet of indoor and outdoor living space, including five (flex six) bedrooms, three full and two half bathrooms, two wood-burning fireplaces, and three decorative fireplaces. The townhouse between Fifth and Sixth avenues is on the market for $12 million with Meris, Kenny, and Sydney Blumstein of Corcoran. No word if the shutter-matching Vespa, so familiar to those who have walked by the house in years past, is included in the sale (though we’d guess probably not.)