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10 Arrested Developments That Need a Kick in the Caboose

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When 56 Leonard announced its triumphant return from the dead, we started thinking about all of the other arrested developments we'd love to see climbing toward the skyline. We asked for your input, and then we added a few more of our favorites to compile this map of 10 projects we wish would come back to life. Some of them are destined to remain unbuilt, alas, but for the rest, we're keeping our fingers crossed.

· Which of NYC's Stalled Buildings Should Be Resurrected Next? [Curbed]
· Arrested Development coverage [Curbed]

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80 South Street

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Santiago Calatrava's plan for a Tower o' Penthouses took forever to die at 80 South Street, but eventually it was replaced by plans for a 720-foot tower with a skin made of photovoltaic glass. The proposal also calls for cascading gardens running through the facade.

50 West Street

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Some new renderings for this long-thought-lost project resurfaced at the end of 2011. Developer Time Equities has never pushed the project any further than the "pre-development" phase, alas.

30 Park Place/99 Church Street

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Developer Larry Silverstein announced plans to break ground on this project, a Robert A.M. Stern-designed Four Seasons/condo building, this year. Nothing yet, but there are almost three months to go in 2012.

5 Franklin Place

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This is another project that's really coming back—it's scheduled to hit the market in January. Unfortunately, what used to be a delightfully wacky black and bendy design from Dutch architect Ben Van Berkels has been replaced by a much more boring vision from Richard DeMarco, so the van Berkels design still has a spot on our wishlist.

23 East 22nd Street

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The Rem Koolhaas-designed sibling to One Madison Park got the axe during the economic meltdown (which meant a sad farewell to its utterly wacky sales office, too). But when One Madison Park's receiver asked for permission to bring architect Cary Tamarkin on board to help finish the project, there was a hint that he might help to figure out the future of the Koolhaas lot, too. Dare we hope that the starchitect's avant-garde design might return? It and 56 Leonard are frenemies, after all.

Metlife North Building

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There are no plans afoot to finish this building, so it will probably retain a permanent place on our wishlist. It stands at 29 stories, but the original plan was for 100. The Skyscraperpage forum has some renderings.

15 Penn Plaza

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This project is one we'd like to see resume not so much for the widely-criticized building itself but for the battle it sparked over the NYC skyline. Vornado Realty Trust's plans for 15 Penn would offer a challenge to the Empire State Building just two blocks away, and perhaps even block views of the ESB from the west. Right now Vornado's focusing on its short-term plan, a renovation of the Hotel Pennsylvania.

50 UN Plaza

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50 United Nations Plaza was rumored to be getting an SLCE-designed, 40-story residential tower. The plans changed, and probably for the good: Foster & Partners were brought on board to design a 44-story residential building with 87 condos and a high-end ground-floor restaurant. The apartments will have plenty of space for entertaining, key for diplomats.

Tower Verre

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Developer Hines filed plans last summer for a shortened version of Jean Nouvel's tower. It will, if it moves forward—fingers crossed—clock in at 78 stories, with 100 hotel rooms and 480,000 square feet of residential space. The design received some tweaks, too. Here's the most recent archibabble: "The facade consists of several sloped planes at different angles, which ascend to a sharp needles at the top of the building. The tower top is distinguished by three distinct asymetrical peaks, of varying height and shape."

The Charles

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The Upper East Side's The Charles remains an empty lot more than two years after its originally scheduled completion date of spring 2010. But the building announced in late 2011 that it was back on track. Developer Victor Homes was allegedly coming on board to "prepare and position the property for construction within the next 12 months"—a deadline that's fast approaching. The original plan was for 45 units designed by David Collins, with the building done by Ismael Leyva.

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80 South Street

Santiago Calatrava's plan for a Tower o' Penthouses took forever to die at 80 South Street, but eventually it was replaced by plans for a 720-foot tower with a skin made of photovoltaic glass. The proposal also calls for cascading gardens running through the facade.

50 West Street

Some new renderings for this long-thought-lost project resurfaced at the end of 2011. Developer Time Equities has never pushed the project any further than the "pre-development" phase, alas.

30 Park Place/99 Church Street

Developer Larry Silverstein announced plans to break ground on this project, a Robert A.M. Stern-designed Four Seasons/condo building, this year. Nothing yet, but there are almost three months to go in 2012.

5 Franklin Place

This is another project that's really coming back—it's scheduled to hit the market in January. Unfortunately, what used to be a delightfully wacky black and bendy design from Dutch architect Ben Van Berkels has been replaced by a much more boring vision from Richard DeMarco, so the van Berkels design still has a spot on our wishlist.

23 East 22nd Street

The Rem Koolhaas-designed sibling to One Madison Park got the axe during the economic meltdown (which meant a sad farewell to its utterly wacky sales office, too). But when One Madison Park's receiver asked for permission to bring architect Cary Tamarkin on board to help finish the project, there was a hint that he might help to figure out the future of the Koolhaas lot, too. Dare we hope that the starchitect's avant-garde design might return? It and 56 Leonard are frenemies, after all.

Metlife North Building

There are no plans afoot to finish this building, so it will probably retain a permanent place on our wishlist. It stands at 29 stories, but the original plan was for 100. The Skyscraperpage forum has some renderings.

15 Penn Plaza

This project is one we'd like to see resume not so much for the widely-criticized building itself but for the battle it sparked over the NYC skyline. Vornado Realty Trust's plans for 15 Penn would offer a challenge to the Empire State Building just two blocks away, and perhaps even block views of the ESB from the west. Right now Vornado's focusing on its short-term plan, a renovation of the Hotel Pennsylvania.

50 UN Plaza

50 United Nations Plaza was rumored to be getting an SLCE-designed, 40-story residential tower. The plans changed, and probably for the good: Foster & Partners were brought on board to design a 44-story residential building with 87 condos and a high-end ground-floor restaurant. The apartments will have plenty of space for entertaining, key for diplomats.

Tower Verre

Developer Hines filed plans last summer for a shortened version of Jean Nouvel's tower. It will, if it moves forward—fingers crossed—clock in at 78 stories, with 100 hotel rooms and 480,000 square feet of residential space. The design received some tweaks, too. Here's the most recent archibabble: "The facade consists of several sloped planes at different angles, which ascend to a sharp needles at the top of the building. The tower top is distinguished by three distinct asymetrical peaks, of varying height and shape."

The Charles

The Upper East Side's The Charles remains an empty lot more than two years after its originally scheduled completion date of spring 2010. But the building announced in late 2011 that it was back on track. Developer Victor Homes was allegedly coming on board to "prepare and position the property for construction within the next 12 months"—a deadline that's fast approaching. The original plan was for 45 units designed by David Collins, with the building done by Ismael Leyva.