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10 Buildings Possibly Endangered by a Midtown East Rezoning

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The city is hoping to upzone the area around Grand Central Terminal, allowing taller buildings and additional special projects in a 74-block area between 37th and 57th streets. Among the people not happy about this: historic preservationists, who worry that the plan could endanger some historic but un-landmarked buildings in the area. The New York City Landmarks Conservancy has come up with a list of 15 possibly endangered buildings around Grand Central that were built between 1911 and the late 1920s, and the Journal reports on a few of the properties in question. We went through the conservancy's list to find 10 of the most notable endangered buildings, and we collected 'em all on a map.

· Proposed Midtown East Rezoning Targets Historic Buildings Near Grand Central [NYCLC]
· Preservationists Fret Over Midtown Rezoning [WSJ]
· Midtown East Rezoning coverage [Curbed]

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1. 125 Park Avenue

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125 Park Ave
New York, New York 10017

This York and Sawyer-designed building was built in 1922 and has since been modernized. For anyone who wants to go on a York and Sawyer kick as a result of their inclusion on this list, Columbia has a collection of their architectural drawings.

2. Lincoln Building

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60 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017

This 1930 building on East 42nd Street was designed by James Edwin Ruthven Carpenter Jr. and finished in 1930. Wikipedia teaches us that it's currently the 49th tallest building in New York City, which is a fun claim to fame.

3. 51 East 42nd Street

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51 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017

The New York Landmarks Conservancy lists the Vanderbilt Avenue facade of this building as endangered by the proposed rezoning. The property changed hands at the end of last year, and new owner SL Green was already eligible to buy unused air rights and expand the building.

4. Graybar Building

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420 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10168

The Art Deco Graybar Building was built c. 1926, and it has some funky detailing, including reliefs of Promotheus and cables in the shape of a ship's ropes.

5. Yale Club of New York City

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50 Vanderbilt Ave.
New York, NY 10017
(212) 716-2100
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James Gamble Rogers designed this building in 1915, one of the architect's many Yale-related commissions. The New York Landmarks Conservancy has identified the entire Vanderbilt Avenue area outside of the Yale Club as potentially endangered by the Midtown East rezoning.

6. Roosevelt Hotel

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45 E 45th St.
New York, NY 10017
(212) 661-9600
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This 1925 building was designed by George B. Post. Even after an extensive renovation in the 1990s, the building has retained its original facade—one of the few hotels in the Terminal City area, the Journal explains, to have done so.

7. Postum Building

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250 Park Avenue
New York, NY

This 21-story building was built by Cross & Cross, the designers of Tiffany & Co. and the General Electric Building, in 1925. Building manager Dan Bradley tells the Journal that the management company, AEW Capital Management, is "studying the proposed language" of the rezoning plan very carefully to figure out how it will affect the property.

8. The Lexington

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511 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10171
(212) 755-4400
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This hotel, designed by Schultze and Weaver, opened in 1929. (Schultze, as it happens, also worked on the design for Grand Central Terminal during his previous employment at Warren & Wetmore.)

9. New York Marriott East Side

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525 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10017
(800) 242-8684

What's now a Marriott at 525 Lexington Avenue used to be the Haloran House, and before that, the Shelton Towers Hotel. The Arthur Loomis Harmon-designed building, finished in 1924, was, as the one and only Carter B. Horsley points out, one of the first buildings to comply with the zoning resolution of 1916. Harmon received a gold medal from the Architectural League of New York and the American Institute of Architects for the design.

10. The Benjamin Hotel

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125 E 50th St
New York, NY 10022
(212) 715-2500
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This Emery Roth-designed 1925 building was once the Beverly Hotel. It's now the Benjamin Hotel, with the name change having followed a makeover and reopening in 1999. (Here's what the building looked like circa 1930.)

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1. 125 Park Avenue

125 Park Ave, New York, New York 10017

This York and Sawyer-designed building was built in 1922 and has since been modernized. For anyone who wants to go on a York and Sawyer kick as a result of their inclusion on this list, Columbia has a collection of their architectural drawings.

125 Park Ave
New York, New York 10017

2. Lincoln Building

60 E 42nd St, New York, NY 10017

This 1930 building on East 42nd Street was designed by James Edwin Ruthven Carpenter Jr. and finished in 1930. Wikipedia teaches us that it's currently the 49th tallest building in New York City, which is a fun claim to fame.

60 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017

3. 51 East 42nd Street

51 E 42nd St, New York, NY 10017

The New York Landmarks Conservancy lists the Vanderbilt Avenue facade of this building as endangered by the proposed rezoning. The property changed hands at the end of last year, and new owner SL Green was already eligible to buy unused air rights and expand the building.

51 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017

4. Graybar Building

420 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 10168

The Art Deco Graybar Building was built c. 1926, and it has some funky detailing, including reliefs of Promotheus and cables in the shape of a ship's ropes.

420 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10168

5. Yale Club of New York City

50 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, NY 10017

James Gamble Rogers designed this building in 1915, one of the architect's many Yale-related commissions. The New York Landmarks Conservancy has identified the entire Vanderbilt Avenue area outside of the Yale Club as potentially endangered by the Midtown East rezoning.

50 Vanderbilt Ave.
New York, NY 10017

6. Roosevelt Hotel

45 E 45th St., New York, NY 10017

This 1925 building was designed by George B. Post. Even after an extensive renovation in the 1990s, the building has retained its original facade—one of the few hotels in the Terminal City area, the Journal explains, to have done so.

45 E 45th St.
New York, NY 10017

7. Postum Building

250 Park Avenue, New York, NY

This 21-story building was built by Cross & Cross, the designers of Tiffany & Co. and the General Electric Building, in 1925. Building manager Dan Bradley tells the Journal that the management company, AEW Capital Management, is "studying the proposed language" of the rezoning plan very carefully to figure out how it will affect the property.

250 Park Avenue
New York, NY

8. The Lexington

511 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 10171

This hotel, designed by Schultze and Weaver, opened in 1929. (Schultze, as it happens, also worked on the design for Grand Central Terminal during his previous employment at Warren & Wetmore.)

511 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10171

9. New York Marriott East Side

525 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 10017

What's now a Marriott at 525 Lexington Avenue used to be the Haloran House, and before that, the Shelton Towers Hotel. The Arthur Loomis Harmon-designed building, finished in 1924, was, as the one and only Carter B. Horsley points out, one of the first buildings to comply with the zoning resolution of 1916. Harmon received a gold medal from the Architectural League of New York and the American Institute of Architects for the design.

525 Lexington Ave.
New York, NY 10017

10. The Benjamin Hotel

125 E 50th St, New York, NY 10022

This Emery Roth-designed 1925 building was once the Beverly Hotel. It's now the Benjamin Hotel, with the name change having followed a makeover and reopening in 1999. (Here's what the building looked like circa 1930.)

125 E 50th St
New York, NY 10022