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10 Historic Sites Facing Preservation Battles Right Now

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In the months since our last Preservation Watch Heatmap, new preservation controversies have surfaced, including worries over the future of the Pan Am Worldport at JFK and the Mary Help of Christians buildings in the East Village, and old ones have raged on, including the fight over the penthouse atop Chelsea's Hopper-Gibbons House. Which means it's time for an update to the preservation map! Read on for more about 10 of the city's current preservation battles.


· Heatmap: 10 Sites Facing Preservation Battles Right Now [Curbed]
· Preservation Watch archive [Curbed]

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1. Pan Am Worldport

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JFK's Terminal 3, the former Pan Am terminal, was recently declared one of the world's most endangered historic places. A vocal contingent of preservationists is hoping to save it from demolition.

2. 429 East 64th Street and 430 East 65th Street

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429 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

Landlord Stahl Real Estate recently filed a hardship application with the Landmarks Preservation Commission. If the LPC grants it, the landlord would be able to demolish the two landmarked walkups it owns on East 64th and East 65th streets. Stahl argues it won't be able to achieve the city-required minimum profit of 6 percent even with a $17+ million renovation. The Friends of the Upper East Side, who hope to save the buildings, contend that Stahl should have no trouble making that kind of profit, and that Stahl's plans include some fuzzy math.

3. Bancroft Building

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3 West 29th Street
New York, NY 10001

Residents of West 29th Street have petitioned the community board and the Landmarks Preservation Commission to consider landmarking the Bancroft Building, the 1896 structure that was once home to Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Club. The neighbors are also calling for potential landmarking for the row houses between 9 and 15 West 29th Street on the grounds that their facades encapsulate the neighborhood's architectural history.

4. 164 South Oxford Street

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164 South Oxford Street
Brooklyn, NY 11217

This Fort Greene lot is now on the market for $9 million, inspiring local concern that the ultimate buyer might build up on the site. There are 23,000 square feet of available air rights, and the owner, who lives next door, has mentioned a willingness to sell his own home as part of the right deal.

5. Mary Help of Christians School

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440 E 12th St
New York, NY 10009

The church buildings are facing demolition to make way for luxury rentals. Opponents of that demolition are pinning their hopes on an archaeological survey of the site to turn up potential historical significance.

6. Tin Pan Alley

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The Chelsea buildings that make up Tin Pan Alley recently hit the market, once again sparking worries that a buyer could demolish the structures for new development. Landmarking the buildings is one of the few potential routes left for saving them.

7. Graybar Building

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420 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10170

The 1927 Graybar Building is just one of eight buildings in the area that could be considered for landmarking in light of the potential rezoning of Midtown East.

8. New York Public Library

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455 5th Ave
New York, NY 10018-2788
(212) 930-0800
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As the battle rages on over the potential Norman Foster-designed makeover of the New York Public Library, the latest word from the library's president is that the plans and financing are still being reviewed: "We are working with our architects to come up with a design for this new space that will incorporate as much as possible of the historic stacks material."

9. Sunset Park Row Houses

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4th Avenue & 56th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11220

In an effort to prevent out-of-context development, the Sunset Park Landmarks Committee is advocating for the area to become a landmark district.

10. Hopper-Gibbons House

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339 West 29th Street
New York, NY 10001

The latest development in the epically long controversy over the Hopper-Gibbons House (historic cred: Abigail and James Hopper-Gibbons ran along the street's rooftops in their escape along the Underground Railroad) is that owner Tony Mamounas is still trying to keep the penthouse he installed before the building was landmarked.

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1. Pan Am Worldport

NY

JFK's Terminal 3, the former Pan Am terminal, was recently declared one of the world's most endangered historic places. A vocal contingent of preservationists is hoping to save it from demolition.

2. 429 East 64th Street and 430 East 65th Street

429 East 64th Street, New York, NY 10065

Landlord Stahl Real Estate recently filed a hardship application with the Landmarks Preservation Commission. If the LPC grants it, the landlord would be able to demolish the two landmarked walkups it owns on East 64th and East 65th streets. Stahl argues it won't be able to achieve the city-required minimum profit of 6 percent even with a $17+ million renovation. The Friends of the Upper East Side, who hope to save the buildings, contend that Stahl should have no trouble making that kind of profit, and that Stahl's plans include some fuzzy math.

429 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

3. Bancroft Building

3 West 29th Street, New York, NY 10001

Residents of West 29th Street have petitioned the community board and the Landmarks Preservation Commission to consider landmarking the Bancroft Building, the 1896 structure that was once home to Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Club. The neighbors are also calling for potential landmarking for the row houses between 9 and 15 West 29th Street on the grounds that their facades encapsulate the neighborhood's architectural history.

3 West 29th Street
New York, NY 10001

4. 164 South Oxford Street

164 South Oxford Street, Brooklyn, NY 11217

This Fort Greene lot is now on the market for $9 million, inspiring local concern that the ultimate buyer might build up on the site. There are 23,000 square feet of available air rights, and the owner, who lives next door, has mentioned a willingness to sell his own home as part of the right deal.

164 South Oxford Street
Brooklyn, NY 11217

5. Mary Help of Christians School

440 E 12th St, New York, NY 10009

The church buildings are facing demolition to make way for luxury rentals. Opponents of that demolition are pinning their hopes on an archaeological survey of the site to turn up potential historical significance.

440 E 12th St
New York, NY 10009

6. Tin Pan Alley

28th st, New York

The Chelsea buildings that make up Tin Pan Alley recently hit the market, once again sparking worries that a buyer could demolish the structures for new development. Landmarking the buildings is one of the few potential routes left for saving them.

7. Graybar Building

420 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10170

The 1927 Graybar Building is just one of eight buildings in the area that could be considered for landmarking in light of the potential rezoning of Midtown East.

420 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10170

8. New York Public Library

455 5th Ave, New York, NY 10018-2788

As the battle rages on over the potential Norman Foster-designed makeover of the New York Public Library, the latest word from the library's president is that the plans and financing are still being reviewed: "We are working with our architects to come up with a design for this new space that will incorporate as much as possible of the historic stacks material."

455 5th Ave
New York, NY 10018-2788

9. Sunset Park Row Houses

4th Avenue & 56th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11220

In an effort to prevent out-of-context development, the Sunset Park Landmarks Committee is advocating for the area to become a landmark district.

4th Avenue & 56th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11220

10. Hopper-Gibbons House

339 West 29th Street, New York, NY 10001

The latest development in the epically long controversy over the Hopper-Gibbons House (historic cred: Abigail and James Hopper-Gibbons ran along the street's rooftops in their escape along the Underground Railroad) is that owner Tony Mamounas is still trying to keep the penthouse he installed before the building was landmarked.

339 West 29th Street
New York, NY 10001