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10 NYC Sites Transforming From Hospitals to Housing, Mapped

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It seems like hospitals are being eaten up left and right by developers hungry to make a profit by converting the large city buildings into pricey apartments. One of the only hospitals below 14th Street, Saint Vincent's, was mostly razed to make way for the mindbogglingly-pricey luxury condos and townhouses of The Greenwich Lane, and if things go according to the current plan, Brooklyn's Long Island College Hospital will follow with a conversion close behind.

The closures and conversions have ignited the anxieties of city dwellers who see their major health care facilities slipping away in exchange for properties not befitting the good of the general public, and politicians have reacted. In late June, assemblymember Jo Anne Simon and state senator Daniel Squadron proposed a bill that would require an assessment of community healthcare needs before hospitals are closed while also providing more transparency surrounding the closure process. Appropriately called the Local Input in Community Healthcare (LICH) Act, the bill that's already got the thumbs up from the state assembly is intended to forego another LICH exploit somewhere else in the city. Quite a few developers have eeked their conversions in prior to the bill's proposal. Here's a look at some of the city's former hospitals where people now make their homes.
—With research and writing by Angely Mercado


· All Curbed Maps coverage [Curbed]

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1. Saint Vincent's Hospital Outpost

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432 West 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019
JVL Property Group

, and Zion Enterprises who continued on with Chetrit's plan to develop condos. The building is now comprised of 55 apartments that range from studios to duplexes, including a two-terraced duplex that was on the market last October for $2.39 million. The least expensive condo in the building was asking $610,000 at the time of launch, but the building's website lists a $750,000 studio as the building's lowest-priced available apartment. Despite the lofty prices, the building's duplexes offer 1,153 square feet of private outdoor space, and the rooftop deck has some panoramic views.

2. St. Vincent's Hospital (Former Site)

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170 W 12th St
New York, NY 10011
iconic O'Toole Building

will live on as a medical center, and be a stand-alone emergency room and medical care center run by the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System. All the better for treating the area's many new residents.

3. Long Island College Hospital

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339 Hicks Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

There is a lot to be said about Long Island College Hospital, mainly that it is involved in an ongoing litigation battle despite any guise of progress towards its redevelopment as apartments. It seems like there's more coverage in the press of the proposed redevelopment's shortcomings, including Brooklyn residents claiming racism or demanding a full-service hospital, than coverage of the array of developers involved in the ongoing struggle towards who will end up developing the property. It seemed like progress was being made at the site about five months ago when a deal was finally struck to sell the facility to Fortis Property Group for $240 million. Fortis plans on running a drastically size-reduced medical center with partners Lutheran Medical Center and NYU Langone Medical Center, and also hopes to erect four towers, one of which may reach 40 stories, containing 820 apartments and retail. If appeals are made to reevaluate bids for the center made by other developers, the legal battle will continue.

4. Cabrini Medical Center

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224 East 20th Street
New York, NY 10003

The Cabrini Medical Center complex in Gramercy was sold by Memorial Sloan-Kettering to developer Joseph Cherit for more than $150 million in early 2013. A mere three months after the purchase, Cherit announced plans to convert the complex into more than 250 very expensive residential units. Architecture firm Woods Bagot will head the conversion. The largest of the four buildings at 209-225 East 19th Street will have 140 condos across 16 floors. The only of the conversion's ground-up buildings, 224 East 20th Street, will have eight floor-through units, and the other two buildings will house 54 condos apiece. The conversion is expected to be complete in 2016.

5. St. Luke's Hospital Staff Housing

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Columbia University, 1080 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10025

SL Green and Stonehenge tapped Andres Escobar and Steven Kratchman Architects to convert hospital staff housing into luxury apartments. After almost two years of renovation, the 20-story building now boasts 95 rental units composed of studios to two bedroom apartments. The building's studios went on the market about a year ago, with prices ranging from $2,500 to $2,800. The two-bedroom penthouse was asking a whopping $10,500 a month. Such lofty prices in Morningside Heights must be accompanied by some serious amenities, which include a 24-hour attended lobby, a laundry room, bike storage, and a media lounge.

6. Caledonian Hospital

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123 Parkside Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11226

This property has transformed from a former Prospect Park-fronting hospital to a Prospect Park-fronting apartment building. Appropriately called 123 on the Park, the building is comprised of 120 units that range from studios asking from $2,099 to three-bedrooms asking from $3,800. The building has 128 parking spaces, over 60 bike parking spaces, and a plethora of common areas like a yoga room, courtyard, gym, and a children's room. The property is owned by the Chetrit Group, and Karl Fischer lead the overhaul.

7. Parkway Hospital

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70-35 113th Street
Flushing, NY 11375

The decaying Parkway Hospital in Forest Hills, Queens closed in 2008 after its owner was arrested for bribing a state senator and has remained empty ever since. The building was auctioned off in January of 2014 for $22 million to a firm who failed to foot the bill, and then traded to real estate firm Jasper Venture Group. Jasper plans to convert the building into condos and enlarge the 100,000-square-foot building's footprint. Whether any of this will come to pass seems sort of a mystery, being that news of the site has been mum lately.

8. Saint John's Hospital

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90-02 Queens Boulevard
Queens, NY 11373

Saint John's in Elmhurst, Queens closed its doors in 2009 after the owners, Caritas Healthcare, filed for bankruptcy. The property was sold in early 2014 along with a nearby parking garage for $47 million to a group of Asian investors who are being represented by NYC builder Steven Wu. They have plans to spend close to $45 million to convert the building into apartments. The ground floor is slated to have retail space and medical offices.

9. Mary Immaculate Hospital

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88-13 89th Avenue
Woodhaven, NY 11421

Mary Immaculate also went bankrupt and closed in 2009. Unlike some of the other hospitals throughout the city that are being converted into mindbogglingly-pricey condos, Mary Immaculate is being converted into less expensive apartments. It's also among one of the multiple ongoing developments in Jamaica, Queens. Demolition on the site began in 2013, and a conversion permit filed with the DoB in mid- 2014 says the site's being reworked by noted firm Goldstein, Hill & West. The project is headed by none other than The Cherit Group. Amenities will include a large underground parking area with 237 spaces. The largest of the four buildings will be 16 stories tall, which is not all that short by Jamaica's standards.

10. Jewish Hospital

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545 Prospect Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11238

Crown Heights' Jewish Hospital is currently owned by Alma Realty, who are also behind the controversial Astoria Cove project. The former Jewish Hospital between St. Marks and Prospect Place was originally converted into 700 rent-stabilized apartments throughout six buildings. The development has not been without its snags: In late 2014, after rent-regulated tenants were placed, Alma Realty sent tenants lease renewal notices with market rate rent hikes. The increases were between four to seven percent, so not huge by some standards, but larger than any increase allowed by NYC's Rent Guidelines Board.

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1. Saint Vincent's Hospital Outpost

432 West 52nd Street, New York, NY 10019
JVL Property Group

, and Zion Enterprises who continued on with Chetrit's plan to develop condos. The building is now comprised of 55 apartments that range from studios to duplexes, including a two-terraced duplex that was on the market last October for $2.39 million. The least expensive condo in the building was asking $610,000 at the time of launch, but the building's website lists a $750,000 studio as the building's lowest-priced available apartment. Despite the lofty prices, the building's duplexes offer 1,153 square feet of private outdoor space, and the rooftop deck has some panoramic views.

432 West 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019

2. St. Vincent's Hospital (Former Site)

170 W 12th St, New York, NY 10011
iconic O'Toole Building

will live on as a medical center, and be a stand-alone emergency room and medical care center run by the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System. All the better for treating the area's many new residents.

170 W 12th St
New York, NY 10011

3. Long Island College Hospital

339 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201

There is a lot to be said about Long Island College Hospital, mainly that it is involved in an ongoing litigation battle despite any guise of progress towards its redevelopment as apartments. It seems like there's more coverage in the press of the proposed redevelopment's shortcomings, including Brooklyn residents claiming racism or demanding a full-service hospital, than coverage of the array of developers involved in the ongoing struggle towards who will end up developing the property. It seemed like progress was being made at the site about five months ago when a deal was finally struck to sell the facility to Fortis Property Group for $240 million. Fortis plans on running a drastically size-reduced medical center with partners Lutheran Medical Center and NYU Langone Medical Center, and also hopes to erect four towers, one of which may reach 40 stories, containing 820 apartments and retail. If appeals are made to reevaluate bids for the center made by other developers, the legal battle will continue.

339 Hicks Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

4. Cabrini Medical Center

224 East 20th Street, New York, NY 10003

The Cabrini Medical Center complex in Gramercy was sold by Memorial Sloan-Kettering to developer Joseph Cherit for more than $150 million in early 2013. A mere three months after the purchase, Cherit announced plans to convert the complex into more than 250 very expensive residential units. Architecture firm Woods Bagot will head the conversion. The largest of the four buildings at 209-225 East 19th Street will have 140 condos across 16 floors. The only of the conversion's ground-up buildings, 224 East 20th Street, will have eight floor-through units, and the other two buildings will house 54 condos apiece. The conversion is expected to be complete in 2016.

224 East 20th Street
New York, NY 10003

5. St. Luke's Hospital Staff Housing

Columbia University, 1080 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10025

SL Green and Stonehenge tapped Andres Escobar and Steven Kratchman Architects to convert hospital staff housing into luxury apartments. After almost two years of renovation, the 20-story building now boasts 95 rental units composed of studios to two bedroom apartments. The building's studios went on the market about a year ago, with prices ranging from $2,500 to $2,800. The two-bedroom penthouse was asking a whopping $10,500 a month. Such lofty prices in Morningside Heights must be accompanied by some serious amenities, which include a 24-hour attended lobby, a laundry room, bike storage, and a media lounge.

Columbia University, 1080 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10025

6. Caledonian Hospital

123 Parkside Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11226

This property has transformed from a former Prospect Park-fronting hospital to a Prospect Park-fronting apartment building. Appropriately called 123 on the Park, the building is comprised of 120 units that range from studios asking from $2,099 to three-bedrooms asking from $3,800. The building has 128 parking spaces, over 60 bike parking spaces, and a plethora of common areas like a yoga room, courtyard, gym, and a children's room. The property is owned by the Chetrit Group, and Karl Fischer lead the overhaul.

123 Parkside Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11226

7. Parkway Hospital

70-35 113th Street, Flushing, NY 11375

The decaying Parkway Hospital in Forest Hills, Queens closed in 2008 after its owner was arrested for bribing a state senator and has remained empty ever since. The building was auctioned off in January of 2014 for $22 million to a firm who failed to foot the bill, and then traded to real estate firm Jasper Venture Group. Jasper plans to convert the building into condos and enlarge the 100,000-square-foot building's footprint. Whether any of this will come to pass seems sort of a mystery, being that news of the site has been mum lately.

70-35 113th Street
Flushing, NY 11375

8. Saint John's Hospital

90-02 Queens Boulevard, Queens, NY 11373

Saint John's in Elmhurst, Queens closed its doors in 2009 after the owners, Caritas Healthcare, filed for bankruptcy. The property was sold in early 2014 along with a nearby parking garage for $47 million to a group of Asian investors who are being represented by NYC builder Steven Wu. They have plans to spend close to $45 million to convert the building into apartments. The ground floor is slated to have retail space and medical offices.

90-02 Queens Boulevard
Queens, NY 11373

9. Mary Immaculate Hospital

88-13 89th Avenue, Woodhaven, NY 11421

Mary Immaculate also went bankrupt and closed in 2009. Unlike some of the other hospitals throughout the city that are being converted into mindbogglingly-pricey condos, Mary Immaculate is being converted into less expensive apartments. It's also among one of the multiple ongoing developments in Jamaica, Queens. Demolition on the site began in 2013, and a conversion permit filed with the DoB in mid- 2014 says the site's being reworked by noted firm Goldstein, Hill & West. The project is headed by none other than The Cherit Group. Amenities will include a large underground parking area with 237 spaces. The largest of the four buildings will be 16 stories tall, which is not all that short by Jamaica's standards.

88-13 89th Avenue
Woodhaven, NY 11421

10. Jewish Hospital

545 Prospect Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Crown Heights' Jewish Hospital is currently owned by Alma Realty, who are also behind the controversial Astoria Cove project. The former Jewish Hospital between St. Marks and Prospect Place was originally converted into 700 rent-stabilized apartments throughout six buildings. The development has not been without its snags: In late 2014, after rent-regulated tenants were placed, Alma Realty sent tenants lease renewal notices with market rate rent hikes. The increases were between four to seven percent, so not huge by some standards, but larger than any increase allowed by NYC's Rent Guidelines Board.

545 Prospect Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11238