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42 Star Projects Transforming Architecture in New York City

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Almost every day, it seems, another world-famous architect unveils plans to erect a building in New York City. From first-timers to the local scene like Zaha Hadid, whose curvaceous building along the High Line broke ground this year, to tried-and-true veterans like Robert A.M. Stern, who is working on three limestone-heavy projects (of course), it seems pretty much every starchitect on earth is making New York a testing ground for designs. Their brainchilds, mostly housing pricey condos, are zany and classic, tall and short, cylindrical and pyramidal, glassy and, well, glassier. So check out 42 projects star architects are currently working on—and ones recently complete—across New York City, if only to get a sense of the scale of the change our built environment is about to receive. Think of one we missed? Hit up the tipline. Brace!
—With research and writing by Angely Mercado


· The 10 Most Eye-Catching Pieces of Starchitecture in NYC [Curbed]
· All Starchitecture coverage [Curbed]

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1. 520 West 28th Street - Zaha Hadid

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520 West 28th Street
New York, NY 10001

A high profile architect deserves a high-profile location, so it's fitting that Zaha Hadid's first ever NYC project will rise beside the High Line. Starting at $4.6 million, these condos are some of the priciest, yet some of the coolest. Despite the high starting prices, including $35 million for the penthouse, the swooping curves, glitzy facade and hotel-like facilities such as a sauna, make the prices seem reasonable. Kind of.

2. Cast Iron House - Shigeru Ban

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67 Franklin Street
New York, NY 10013
(212) 577-0067
Visit Website

A project beloved by preservationists for reconfiguring the interior of a 132-year-old building in Tribeca, Shigeru Ban's latest development has drawn more interest since he was awarded the Pritzker Prize in March. Predicted to be completed during the summer of 2015, the project will have two duplex penthouses placed atop the building. They're listed at a whopping $12.95 million, but have wide windows, and a spacious terrance. It makes phrases like "a room with a view" to a whole new level.

3. BAM South - Enrique Norten

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286 Ashland Place
Brooklyn, NY 11217

BAM South, the latest addition to Downtown Brooklyn Cultural District, will hold living and cultural space. It boasts a space for Brooklyn Public Library and 300 apartments, 20 percent of which will be affordable. Despite being on hold for a while, the building is predicted to be completed summer of 2016.

4. Midtown Library - Enrique Norten

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20 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019

Yet another Enrique Norten addition to NYC, the Midtown Library will serve as a sleek new modern facility and a cultural space. The new space will do away with its Media Center and Teenager Room, but will have a technology hub and a 141-seat auditorium. Scorned by critics, the new library will be one third the size of the original library and will be at the base of a 50-story hotel/condo tower.

5. 625 West 57th Street - Bjarke Ingels

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625 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019

Bjarke Ingels' NYC debut/Magic Pyramid on West 57th Street, is steadily taking shape, adding to the skyline what will certainly be one of the quirkiest buildings in the city. Despite the narrowing of each floor, the finished building will hold 709 rental units and will peak at 450 feet, just 5 feet short the pyramids in Giza. The center of the pyramid is sliced open to create terraces for the units and allow for views of the Hudson River.

6. Harlem Residential Project - Bjarke Ingels

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168 East 126th Street
New York, NY 10035

Up on 126th Street in Harlem, another BIG project will be constructed in place of Gotham Plaza's parking lot. Once completed the 200,000-square-foot residential building is said to hold 200 units, 20 percent of which will be reserved for affordable housing. Though not a whole lot of progress has occurred as of yet, anything by Bjarke Ingels is nesting ground for unique shapes, hopefully this time it's a cube, or pentagon.

7. Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 6 - Bjarke Ingels

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Pier 6
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Another Ingels goodie will be located in Brooklyn Bridge Park. It won't be one of the controversial residential buildings, but rather a "humongous Tostito" of a pier. BIG designed a sloping, triangular viewing platform that will cantilever over the pier and host a covered seating area beneath it.

8. 551W21 - Norman Foster

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551 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011
raises the bar for elegant design and crazy prices in West Chelsea.

This 19-story, storm proof building went on the market in February and boasts 44 apartments starting at a little under $6 million. The top floors will encase penthouses starting at $35 million, and the highest penthouse, priced at $50 million, will grant ownership to a 61-foot long pool, part of the 4,000 square feet of private outdoor space that the future owner can add to his/her bragging rights.

9. 50 UN Plaza - Norman Foster

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50 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY

If 551W21 seemed extravagant, Norman Foster's other project, the 43-story 50 UN Plaza takes the cake. Sales for units in the building launched earlier this Spring and one bedroom units start at a little over 2 million.The main feature, the penthouse asks for 100 million. It boasts 7 bedrooms, and an infinity pool. No wonder.

10. 425 Park Avenue - Norman Foster

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425 Park Ave
New York, NY

Though construction has yet to commence on this upcoming Foster project, 425 Park Avenue will break ground in 2015. Eloquently described as "diagonal sinews of steel" and praised for its garden terraces, the building was on hold for a while due to a wait for rezoning that would allow for taller and denser buildings near Grand Central. Despite ongoing delay with rezoning, developers still plan on this 41-story building.

11. 50 West Street - Helmut Jahn

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50 West Street
New York, NY 10014

Despite work on this site starting 10 years ago, developers have finally solidified plans for 50 West Street. The building will rise 64 stories and hold 191 condos. Thanks to Hurricane Sandy, changes have been made to the design, like adding a generator on the fourth floor and raising the lobby three feet. Pricing is said to range from $1,400 to $2,000 dollars per square foot. Before any outrage starts, the building has perks, including a hot tub and a 60-foot pool, and famed designer Thomas Juul-Hansen is creating the interiors.

12. One World Trade Center - David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

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1 World Trade Center
New York, NY 10006

One World Trade Center: despite being recently controversial for its lack of security, and people jumping off it, is also one of the most expensive office buildings in the world. The tallest tower in the Western Hemisphere is currently 55 percent leased and had to cut rent for the middle floors at 10 percent. Despite that, owners of the building signed to lease the 87th floor to advertising firm Kid's Creative this May, the first private tenant in about three years. The building went through a slew of design changes, but the tower standing today is the brainchild of SOM, including partner David Childs.

13. Solar Carve by Studio/Gang

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56 10th Avenue
New York, NY 10014

Solar Carve, an elaborate glass-encased wedge that doubles as a 10-story office building, and architect Jeanne Gang's first NYC project. The project was halted earlier this year due to opposition by Greenwich Village Society for Historic Housing Preservation and having to apply for a zoning variance that would have allowed for additional square feet on the project. Changes are being made to the design and will be finalized in 2015. The building's curvy design was done with angle of the sun in mind to avoid casting shadows on the High Line.

14. 152 Elizabeth Street - Tadao Ando

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152 Elizabeth Street
New York, NY 10012

Yet another Pritzker Prize winner on our list, architect Tadao Ando is the creative brains behind 152 Elizabeth Street. Ando has designed several other projects in East Asia, Europe, and in the US. Known for striking a fluid balance between concrete and glass in his past creations, there's a buzz regarding what 152 could potentially look like. The building has 32,000 square feet of potential and is expected to be completed in 2016.

15. Pier A - Hugh Hardy

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Comptroller John Liu rejected Battery Park City's proposal

to request a bond sale, profits would have gone towards building an outdoor public plaza. The pier's restaurant complex is expected to open this month.

16. Theatre For A New Audience - Hugh Hardy

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262 Ashland Place
Brooklyn, NY 11217
(212) 229-2819

Previously planned to be designed by Hardy and Gehry, the design of the Theater for a New Audience was tackled by Hardy alone and it officially opened as part of BAM in 2013. Lit up and surrounded by outdoor seats and trees, it's tasteful and easy on the eyes and was made to seat over 200 and designed to be flexible for different types of performances.

17. 432 Park Avenue - Rafael Vinoly

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432 Park Ave S
New York, NY 10016

This building just keeps rising up over the all others in its vicinity—in height and price. The penthouse is priced at...wait for it... $76.5 million. Soon to be one of the tallest residential buildings in NYC at 1,396 feet, the tower's height raised some concerns regarding how high it'll rise above tree lines in Central Park. But it's hard not to get caught up in its perfectly symmetrical square shape and epic floor plans.

18. 22 Thames Street - Rafael Vinoly

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22 Thames Street
New York, NY 10006

Another Rafael Vinoly that's in the works, and yet another that will give renters a stairway to heaven, as it might become Downtown Manhattan's tallest residential building (if approved). Like Vinoly's 432 Park, 22 Thames will be thin and shiny and will have perks like a gym, conference room, and even a club room for all those cool kids. It's expected to be completed by mid 2017.

19. Rockefeller University Expansion - Rafael Vinoly

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1230 York Ave
New York, NY 10065

20. One57 - Christian de Portzamparc

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157 W 57th St
New York, NY 10019
(212) 570-1700
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One57, one of the most talked about and most expensive buildings in the city, is getting closer and closer to the end of construction and has made several mind-boggling sales—and resales. A 60th floor apartment was re-sold in early April for $30.6 million, and a 62nd floor unit went for $31.6 million. The penthouse is reportedly in contract for a whopping $90 million. Architect Christian de Portzamparc's original inspiration was that of a waterfall, but several rounds of city reviews and cost-cutting dulled it down to the rather ghastly wavy blue building it is today.

21. 400 Park Avenue South - Christian de Portzamparc

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400 Park Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 207-8300
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Like other Pritzker Prize winners on this list, de Portzamparc really likes glass and contorting angles. He describes 400 Park Avenue South—known around these parts as the Fortress of Glassitude— as being composed of a group of multiple structures at oblique angles, rather than just one building. As pleasing to the eye as it seems, starting prices aren't as forgiving. Studio apartments go for $1.2 million and up. The view better be worth it.

22. 30 Park Place - Robert A.M. Stern

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30 Park Place
New York, NY 10007

An architect known for new-construction projects and infusing them with a dignified prewar vibe—please see the Limestone Jesus a.k.a. 15 Central Park West for evidence—Robert A.M. Stern is juggling three projects in NYC right now. The furthest along (because it has broken ground and is on the rise)? Silverstein Properties' 30 Park Place, where there will be 157 very expensive condos and a Four Seasons hotel. Oh hey, and it just got some classy limestone panels.

23. 220 Central Park South - Robert A.M. Stern

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220 Central Park South
New York, NY 10019

Vornado's long-awaited tower for Central Park South certainly looks Sternified, replete with limestone and upper-level setbacks. It'll be 950 feet tall, putting it just a tad behind so many of the other supertowers getting designed today. A slew of renderings were leaked in January of this year, and boy, was that glorious.

24. 520 Park Avenue - Robert A.M. Stern

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520 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10065

The newest of the RAMS bunch, 520 Park Avenue has been framed as a 15 CPW imitator. Developed by the Zeckendorfs, after they secured air rights and a coveted address from a Park Ave. church, the planned 51-story tower for East 60th Street and Park Avenue will—surprise—boast more limestone. Despite its generous height, 520 Park will have just 31 units, one of which will be a mega penthouse "priced at considerably more than $100 million." Obviously. Asks for the "cheaper" units will start around, brace, $27 million.

25. Tower Verre - Jean Nouvel

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53 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019

It was stalled, but now it's revived. Tower Verre, a 1,050-foot tower next to MoMA at 53 West 53rd Street, sprang from the brain of Jean Nouvel, another Pritzker alum with plenty of NYC projects under his belt. The spidery facade, tapered top, and other architectural nuances were halted when financing dried up, but a $1 billion cash infusion in the fall of 2013 pushed this project out of unarrested development. On the way are 145 luxury condos plus three floors of new gallery space for MoMA. Move-ins lie ahead, far ahead, in 2018 (if we're lucky).

26. 51 Park Place - Jean Nouvel

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51 Park Place
New York, NY 10007

Nouvel's most recent New York City commission will rise on a much-contested battleground: that of Park51, the Islamic prayer and cultural center on Park Place that sparked heated debate over whether such an institution should stand in such close proximity to the World Trade Center site. Developer Sharif el-Gamal tapped Nouvel to build a three-story Islamic museum at 51 Park Place; meanwhile, a tower o' condos will rise next door and No. 45.

27. 3 World Trade Center - Richard Rogers

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175 Greenwich St.
New York, NY 10007

Let's hope Centre Pompidou architect Richard Rogers isn't holding his breath for 3 World Trade Center to be finished—he'd have died from oxygen deprivation by now. The Silverstein Properties-developed office building has stalled at eight stories, out of its planned 80, because of funding issues. Namely, a lack of it. The private sector will now get involved so that the skyscraper will one day rise past the podium level. Right?

28. 4 World Trade Center - Fumihiko Maki

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150 Greenwich St.
New York, NY 10007

Another Pritzker Prize-winner did get to see his World Trade Center building open: 85-year-old Japanese architect Fumihiko Mahi, whose shimmery, geometric, "dignified," "subtle," and "compelling" 4 World Trade Center opened its doors in November, on 11/12/13. The 977-foot-tall office building counts the Port Authority as its main tenant.

29. Facebook's NYC Office - Frank Gehry

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770 Broadway
New York, NY 10003

He may not be designing the World Trade Center's arts venue anymore, but hey, starchitect Frank Gehry is wrapping up another project that's gotta be just as important: Facebook's New York headquarters. Located near Astor Place at 770 Broadway, the large space started to house employees this spring, when the space was colorful if partially done.

30. 56 Leonard Street - Herzog and de Meuron

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56 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013

Watching Herzog & de Meuron's long-awaited glassy Jenga tower rise in Tribeca is one of the more fun sights for construction junkies—with its corners all akimbo and asymmetrical sides and cantilevers jutting out all over the place. After getting stalled for awhile, the 821-foot, 56-story goliath packed full of uber-luxe condos (a storage unit went for $300K) is about halfway to its full height. And, of course, one of the penthouses is in contract for $47 million.

31. West Street Condos - Herzog & de Meuron

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354 West Street
New York, NY 10014

There aren't any visuals yet, but Swiss starchitects Herzog & de Meuron are probably working another condo building downtown—and before Jenga-tastic 56 Leonard is even topped out, too. A proposed 12-story project with condos on West Street between Leroy and Clarkson in the West Village had to go before the city's Board of Standard & Appeals to earn a zoning variance, and earn one it did. HdM is listed on the BSA application, so it's all official-like. Developing the mixed-use building is Area Property Partners and hotelier Ian Schrager, so they're the ones to beg for a rendering, stat.

32. Cornell NYC Tech - Thom Mayne

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Roosevelt Island
New York, NY 10044

At the end of 2013, Pritzker Prize-winner Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects unveiled his next NYC project: the first academic building in Cornell's Roosevelt Island tech campus. The first floor of the roughly triangular structure will walled with glazed glass so that passersby can see all the activity inside, but 60 percent of the building will be made of solid materials to minimize heating and cooling needs. The whole thing will be topped by a solar panel array to help the building achieve net-zero energy usage. A water-capture system is just one more eco-friendly feature. Too bad all those green bells and whistles don't do much to impress the neighbors, eh?

33. Campbell Sports Center - Steven Holl

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515 West 218th Street
New York, NY 10034

Steven Holl's library for Long Island City may be stuck in arrested development, but the 2013 opening of Columbia's shiny sports complex in Inwood has earned praise from far and wide. (Well, except from those who live near it, but that was a long time ago—they've since been one over by the pretty park that came as past of the package.) Critics lauded Holl's industrial creation, home to a gym, coaches' offices, an auditorium, and meeting rooms; Michael Kimmelman of the Times is one fan, and Bloomberg writer James Russell called it "an architectural chameleon."

34. 10 Bond Street - Annabelle Selldorf

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10 Bond Street
New York, NY 10012

New York's architectural darling Annabelle Selldorf is at it again, joining starchitect row on Bond Street with a contribution at number 10. Neighbors actually like the terra cotta-and-weathered steel facade of the Noho project at Lafayette Street, which is topped with a trellis. Developed by triumvirate SK Development, Ironstate Development and the Chetrit Group, the currently-under-construction corner site will eventually house 11 apartments, which start at around $4.5 million. Four are in contract already, and the building is scheduled to be complete in the first quarter of 2015.

35. SIMS Municipal Recycling - Annabelle Selldorf

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472 2nd Ave
Sunset Park, NY 11215

Sometimes, even buildings that do the dirty work get a little love from starchitects. Selldorf designed the SIMS Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility, which boasted a budget of $89 million and is LEED certified, in part because 98 percent of the complex is made out of recycled steel. Inside, there's an education center, classrooms, offices, a theater, and a large outdoor terrace with views to Lower Manhattan. New York Times critic Michael Kimmelman described it as "understated, well proportioned and well planned—elegant, actually, and not just for a garbage site." [Photo via Field Condition.]

36. Reade Chambers - Annabelle Selldorf

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71 Reade Street
New York, NY 10007

The 17 condos going up in Tribeca between Duane and Chambers streets will have a distinctly Selldorfian air, at least on the inside, where she's designing the minimalist-yet-classic interiors.

37. 347 Bowery - Annabelle Selldorf

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347 Bowery
New York, NY 10003

For a while there, it looked like the old Salvation Army residence at the corner of Bowery and East Third Street was going to become a hideous hotel dotted with glowing red tumors. But then developer Urban Muse tapped Annabelle Selldorf for a residential project with five three-bedroom condos and retail at the ground level, and the city breathed a sigh of relief. Well, half a sigh, since fleshed-out renderings haven't materialized and the ridiculous amenity of parking next to your apartment is still up in the air.

38. Whitney Downtown - Renzo Piano

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820 Washington Street
New York, NY 10014

Farther from its October 2011 groundbreaking than to its planned 2015 opening, the Whitney Museum of American Art's new Meatpacking District building is raring to go. Designed by Renzo Piano (of the New York Times building, London's Shard, and so many others), the 200,000-square-foot tiered building along the High Line is also mindbogglingly storm-proof. This timelapse video is slightly outdated, but there's a pretty awesome live stream of the construction site that allows interested parties to track the museum's progress over the last three years... and check back on it every day, if that's something one wishes to do.

39. Columbia Science Center - Renzo Piano

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Broadway & West 129th Street
New York, NY 10027

Columbia University's 10-story Jerome L. Greene Science Center is currently rising near Broadway and 125th Street and will eventually house an assortment of scientists who study the mind and brain. The first bit of the school's new Manhattanville campus to be built in real life, the project was first announced in 2010, with the Italian Priker Prize-winner was anointed its architect from the beginning. Perhaps the eventual tenants of the ivory tower should study his brain when their labs are all set up?

40. MoMA Expansion - Diller Scofidio + Renfro

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11 W 53rd St
New York, NY 10019
(212) 708-9400
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Known for their work on artistic and cultural sites (see Lincoln Center, among other places), Diller Scofidio + Renfro is responsible for the Museum of Modern Art's controversial Midtown expansion. Controversial, because building more gallery and exhibition space, a performance venue, and a retractable glass wall, plus opening the sculpture garden to the public, comes at the cost of demolishing the bronze-facaded former American Folk Art Museum. Neighbors were not fans of DS+R's glassy design, but construction is slated begin this year and last until 2018 or 2019.

41. Culture Shed - Diller Scofidio + Renfro

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A caveat: The giant Culture Shed, meant to be the epicenter of artistic life at West Side mini-city Hudson Yards, is not set to open till 2017—and that's optimistic—so renderings for it are by default preliminary. (Especially because the issue of, oh, financing is still up in the air.) But Diller Scofidio + Renfro and the Rockwell group have ambitious architectural plans for the High Line-adjacent site at 30th Street and Eleventh Avenue, meant to house flexible spaces for performances and installations. Flexible, meaning that the canopies are designed to expand and contract to enlarge or shrink the building as needed.

42. Columbia University - Diller Scofidio + Renfro

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3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
(212) 854-5553
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Alongside Renzo Piano, DS+R is also tackling buildings for Columbia's omnipresent expansion. Both the business school (pictured) and the medical school structures feature crazy cascading towers. The Observer called the 14-story tower for the med school "the craziest building in Harlem." When it's built, that is.

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1. 520 West 28th Street - Zaha Hadid

520 West 28th Street, New York, NY 10001

A high profile architect deserves a high-profile location, so it's fitting that Zaha Hadid's first ever NYC project will rise beside the High Line. Starting at $4.6 million, these condos are some of the priciest, yet some of the coolest. Despite the high starting prices, including $35 million for the penthouse, the swooping curves, glitzy facade and hotel-like facilities such as a sauna, make the prices seem reasonable. Kind of.

520 West 28th Street
New York, NY 10001

2. Cast Iron House - Shigeru Ban

67 Franklin Street, New York, NY 10013

A project beloved by preservationists for reconfiguring the interior of a 132-year-old building in Tribeca, Shigeru Ban's latest development has drawn more interest since he was awarded the Pritzker Prize in March. Predicted to be completed during the summer of 2015, the project will have two duplex penthouses placed atop the building. They're listed at a whopping $12.95 million, but have wide windows, and a spacious terrance. It makes phrases like "a room with a view" to a whole new level.

67 Franklin Street
New York, NY 10013

3. BAM South - Enrique Norten

286 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, NY 11217

BAM South, the latest addition to Downtown Brooklyn Cultural District, will hold living and cultural space. It boasts a space for Brooklyn Public Library and 300 apartments, 20 percent of which will be affordable. Despite being on hold for a while, the building is predicted to be completed summer of 2016.

286 Ashland Place
Brooklyn, NY 11217

4. Midtown Library - Enrique Norten

20 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Yet another Enrique Norten addition to NYC, the Midtown Library will serve as a sleek new modern facility and a cultural space. The new space will do away with its Media Center and Teenager Room, but will have a technology hub and a 141-seat auditorium. Scorned by critics, the new library will be one third the size of the original library and will be at the base of a 50-story hotel/condo tower.

20 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019

5. 625 West 57th Street - Bjarke Ingels

625 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Bjarke Ingels' NYC debut/Magic Pyramid on West 57th Street, is steadily taking shape, adding to the skyline what will certainly be one of the quirkiest buildings in the city. Despite the narrowing of each floor, the finished building will hold 709 rental units and will peak at 450 feet, just 5 feet short the pyramids in Giza. The center of the pyramid is sliced open to create terraces for the units and allow for views of the Hudson River.

625 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019

6. Harlem Residential Project - Bjarke Ingels

168 East 126th Street, New York, NY 10035

Up on 126th Street in Harlem, another BIG project will be constructed in place of Gotham Plaza's parking lot. Once completed the 200,000-square-foot residential building is said to hold 200 units, 20 percent of which will be reserved for affordable housing. Though not a whole lot of progress has occurred as of yet, anything by Bjarke Ingels is nesting ground for unique shapes, hopefully this time it's a cube, or pentagon.

168 East 126th Street
New York, NY 10035

7. Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 6 - Bjarke Ingels

Pier 6, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Another Ingels goodie will be located in Brooklyn Bridge Park. It won't be one of the controversial residential buildings, but rather a "humongous Tostito" of a pier. BIG designed a sloping, triangular viewing platform that will cantilever over the pier and host a covered seating area beneath it.

Pier 6
Brooklyn, NY 11201

8. 551W21 - Norman Foster

551 West 21st Street, New York, NY 10011
raises the bar for elegant design and crazy prices in West Chelsea.

This 19-story, storm proof building went on the market in February and boasts 44 apartments starting at a little under $6 million. The top floors will encase penthouses starting at $35 million, and the highest penthouse, priced at $50 million, will grant ownership to a 61-foot long pool, part of the 4,000 square feet of private outdoor space that the future owner can add to his/her bragging rights.

551 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

9. 50 UN Plaza - Norman Foster

50 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY

If 551W21 seemed extravagant, Norman Foster's other project, the 43-story 50 UN Plaza takes the cake. Sales for units in the building launched earlier this Spring and one bedroom units start at a little over 2 million.The main feature, the penthouse asks for 100 million. It boasts 7 bedrooms, and an infinity pool. No wonder.

50 United Nations Plaza
New York, NY

10. 425 Park Avenue - Norman Foster

425 Park Ave, New York, NY

Though construction has yet to commence on this upcoming Foster project, 425 Park Avenue will break ground in 2015. Eloquently described as "diagonal sinews of steel" and praised for its garden terraces, the building was on hold for a while due to a wait for rezoning that would allow for taller and denser buildings near Grand Central. Despite ongoing delay with rezoning, developers still plan on this 41-story building.

425 Park Ave
New York, NY

11. 50 West Street - Helmut Jahn

50 West Street, New York, NY 10014

Despite work on this site starting 10 years ago, developers have finally solidified plans for 50 West Street. The building will rise 64 stories and hold 191 condos. Thanks to Hurricane Sandy, changes have been made to the design, like adding a generator on the fourth floor and raising the lobby three feet. Pricing is said to range from $1,400 to $2,000 dollars per square foot. Before any outrage starts, the building has perks, including a hot tub and a 60-foot pool, and famed designer Thomas Juul-Hansen is creating the interiors.

50 West Street
New York, NY 10014

12. One World Trade Center - David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10006

One World Trade Center: despite being recently controversial for its lack of security, and people jumping off it, is also one of the most expensive office buildings in the world. The tallest tower in the Western Hemisphere is currently 55 percent leased and had to cut rent for the middle floors at 10 percent. Despite that, owners of the building signed to lease the 87th floor to advertising firm Kid's Creative this May, the first private tenant in about three years. The building went through a slew of design changes, but the tower standing today is the brainchild of SOM, including partner David Childs.

1 World Trade Center
New York, NY 10006

13. Solar Carve by Studio/Gang

56 10th Avenue, New York, NY 10014

Solar Carve, an elaborate glass-encased wedge that doubles as a 10-story office building, and architect Jeanne Gang's first NYC project. The project was halted earlier this year due to opposition by Greenwich Village Society for Historic Housing Preservation and having to apply for a zoning variance that would have allowed for additional square feet on the project. Changes are being made to the design and will be finalized in 2015. The building's curvy design was done with angle of the sun in mind to avoid casting shadows on the High Line.

56 10th Avenue
New York, NY 10014

14. 152 Elizabeth Street - Tadao Ando

152 Elizabeth Street, New York, NY 10012

Yet another Pritzker Prize winner on our list, architect Tadao Ando is the creative brains behind 152 Elizabeth Street. Ando has designed several other projects in East Asia, Europe, and in the US. Known for striking a fluid balance between concrete and glass in his past creations, there's a buzz regarding what 152 could potentially look like. The building has 32,000 square feet of potential and is expected to be completed in 2016.

152 Elizabeth Street
New York, NY 10012

15. Pier A - Hugh Hardy

New York
Comptroller John Liu rejected Battery Park City's proposal

to request a bond sale, profits would have gone towards building an outdoor public plaza. The pier's restaurant complex is expected to open this month.

16. Theatre For A New Audience - Hugh Hardy

262 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, NY 11217

Previously planned to be designed by Hardy and Gehry, the design of the Theater for a New Audience was tackled by Hardy alone and it officially opened as part of BAM in 2013. Lit up and surrounded by outdoor seats and trees, it's tasteful and easy on the eyes and was made to seat over 200 and designed to be flexible for different types of performances.

262 Ashland Place
Brooklyn, NY 11217

17. 432 Park Avenue - Rafael Vinoly

432 Park Ave S, New York, NY 10016

This building just keeps rising up over the all others in its vicinity—in height and price. The penthouse is priced at...wait for it... $76.5 million. Soon to be one of the tallest residential buildings in NYC at 1,396 feet, the tower's height raised some concerns regarding how high it'll rise above tree lines in Central Park. But it's hard not to get caught up in its perfectly symmetrical square shape and epic floor plans.

432 Park Ave S
New York, NY 10016

18. 22 Thames Street - Rafael Vinoly

22 Thames Street, New York, NY 10006

Another Rafael Vinoly that's in the works, and yet another that will give renters a stairway to heaven, as it might become Downtown Manhattan's tallest residential building (if approved). Like Vinoly's 432 Park, 22 Thames will be thin and shiny and will have perks like a gym, conference room, and even a club room for all those cool kids. It's expected to be completed by mid 2017.

22 Thames Street
New York, NY 10006

19. Rockefeller University Expansion - Rafael Vinoly

1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065
1230 York Ave
New York, NY 10065

20. One57 - Christian de Portzamparc

157 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019

One57, one of the most talked about and most expensive buildings in the city, is getting closer and closer to the end of construction and has made several mind-boggling sales—and resales. A 60th floor apartment was re-sold in early April for $30.6 million, and a 62nd floor unit went for $31.6 million. The penthouse is reportedly in contract for a whopping $90 million. Architect Christian de Portzamparc's original inspiration was that of a waterfall, but several rounds of city reviews and cost-cutting dulled it down to the rather ghastly wavy blue building it is today.

157 W 57th St
New York, NY 10019

21. 400 Park Avenue South - Christian de Portzamparc

400 Park Ave, New York, NY 10022

Like other Pritzker Prize winners on this list, de Portzamparc really likes glass and contorting angles. He describes 400 Park Avenue South—known around these parts as the Fortress of Glassitude— as being composed of a group of multiple structures at oblique angles, rather than just one building. As pleasing to the eye as it seems, starting prices aren't as forgiving. Studio apartments go for $1.2 million and up. The view better be worth it.

400 Park Ave
New York, NY 10022

22. 30 Park Place - Robert A.M. Stern

30 Park Place, New York, NY 10007

An architect known for new-construction projects and infusing them with a dignified prewar vibe—please see the Limestone Jesus a.k.a. 15 Central Park West for evidence—Robert A.M. Stern is juggling three projects in NYC right now. The furthest along (because it has broken ground and is on the rise)? Silverstein Properties' 30 Park Place, where there will be 157 very expensive condos and a Four Seasons hotel. Oh hey, and it just got some classy limestone panels.

30 Park Place
New York, NY 10007

23. 220 Central Park South - Robert A.M. Stern

220 Central Park South, New York, NY 10019

Vornado's long-awaited tower for Central Park South certainly looks Sternified, replete with limestone and upper-level setbacks. It'll be 950 feet tall, putting it just a tad behind so many of the other supertowers getting designed today. A slew of renderings were leaked in January of this year, and boy, was that glorious.

220 Central Park South
New York, NY 10019

24. 520 Park Avenue - Robert A.M. Stern

520 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065

The newest of the RAMS bunch, 520 Park Avenue has been framed as a 15 CPW imitator. Developed by the Zeckendorfs, after they secured air rights and a coveted address from a Park Ave. church, the planned 51-story tower for East 60th Street and Park Avenue will—surprise—boast more limestone. Despite its generous height, 520 Park will have just 31 units, one of which will be a mega penthouse "priced at considerably more than $100 million." Obviously. Asks for the "cheaper" units will start around, brace, $27 million.

520 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10065

25. Tower Verre - Jean Nouvel

53 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

It was stalled, but now it's revived. Tower Verre, a 1,050-foot tower next to MoMA at 53 West 53rd Street, sprang from the brain of Jean Nouvel, another Pritzker alum with plenty of NYC projects under his belt. The spidery facade, tapered top, and other architectural nuances were halted when financing dried up, but a $1 billion cash infusion in the fall of 2013 pushed this project out of unarrested development. On the way are 145 luxury condos plus three floors of new gallery space for MoMA. Move-ins lie ahead, far ahead, in 2018 (if we're lucky).

53 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019

26. 51 Park Place - Jean Nouvel

51 Park Place, New York, NY 10007

Nouvel's most recent New York City commission will rise on a much-contested battleground: that of Park51, the Islamic prayer and cultural center on Park Place that sparked heated debate over whether such an institution should stand in such close proximity to the World Trade Center site. Developer Sharif el-Gamal tapped Nouvel to build a three-story Islamic museum at 51 Park Place; meanwhile, a tower o' condos will rise next door and No. 45.

51 Park Place
New York, NY 10007

27. 3 World Trade Center - Richard Rogers

175 Greenwich St., New York, NY 10007

Let's hope Centre Pompidou architect Richard Rogers isn't holding his breath for 3 World Trade Center to be finished—he'd have died from oxygen deprivation by now. The Silverstein Properties-developed office building has stalled at eight stories, out of its planned 80, because of funding issues. Namely, a lack of it. The private sector will now get involved so that the skyscraper will one day rise past the podium level. Right?

175 Greenwich St.
New York, NY 10007

28. 4 World Trade Center - Fumihiko Maki

150 Greenwich St., New York, NY 10007

Another Pritzker Prize-winner did get to see his World Trade Center building open: 85-year-old Japanese architect Fumihiko Mahi, whose shimmery, geometric, "dignified," "subtle," and "compelling" 4 World Trade Center opened its doors in November, on 11/12/13. The 977-foot-tall office building counts the Port Authority as its main tenant.

150 Greenwich St.
New York, NY 10007

29. Facebook's NYC Office - Frank Gehry

770 Broadway, New York, NY 10003

He may not be designing the World Trade Center's arts venue anymore, but hey, starchitect Frank Gehry is wrapping up another project that's gotta be just as important: Facebook's New York headquarters. Located near Astor Place at 770 Broadway, the large space started to house employees this spring, when the space was colorful if partially done.

770 Broadway
New York, NY 10003

30. 56 Leonard Street - Herzog and de Meuron

56 Leonard St, New York, NY 10013

Watching Herzog & de Meuron's long-awaited glassy Jenga tower rise in Tribeca is one of the more fun sights for construction junkies—with its corners all akimbo and asymmetrical sides and cantilevers jutting out all over the place. After getting stalled for awhile, the 821-foot, 56-story goliath packed full of uber-luxe condos (a storage unit went for $300K) is about halfway to its full height. And, of course, one of the penthouses is in contract for $47 million.

56 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013

31. West Street Condos - Herzog & de Meuron

354 West Street, New York, NY 10014

There aren't any visuals yet, but Swiss starchitects Herzog & de Meuron are probably working another condo building downtown—and before Jenga-tastic 56 Leonard is even topped out, too. A proposed 12-story project with condos on West Street between Leroy and Clarkson in the West Village had to go before the city's Board of Standard & Appeals to earn a zoning variance, and earn one it did. HdM is listed on the BSA application, so it's all official-like. Developing the mixed-use building is Area Property Partners and hotelier Ian Schrager, so they're the ones to beg for a rendering, stat.

354 West Street
New York, NY 10014

32. Cornell NYC Tech - Thom Mayne

Roosevelt Island, New York, NY 10044

At the end of 2013, Pritzker Prize-winner Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects unveiled his next NYC project: the first academic building in Cornell's Roosevelt Island tech campus. The first floor of the roughly triangular structure will walled with glazed glass so that passersby can see all the activity inside, but 60 percent of the building will be made of solid materials to minimize heating and cooling needs. The whole thing will be topped by a solar panel array to help the building achieve net-zero energy usage. A water-capture system is just one more eco-friendly feature. Too bad all those green bells and whistles don't do much to impress the neighbors, eh?

Roosevelt Island
New York, NY 10044

33. Campbell Sports Center - Steven Holl

515 West 218th Street, New York, NY 10034

Steven Holl's library for Long Island City may be stuck in arrested development, but the 2013 opening of Columbia's shiny sports complex in Inwood has earned praise from far and wide. (Well, except from those who live near it, but that was a long time ago—they've since been one over by the pretty park that came as past of the package.) Critics lauded Holl's industrial creation, home to a gym, coaches' offices, an auditorium, and meeting rooms; Michael Kimmelman of the Times is one fan, and Bloomberg writer James Russell called it "an architectural chameleon."

515 West 218th Street
New York, NY 10034

34. 10 Bond Street - Annabelle Selldorf

10 Bond Street, New York, NY 10012

New York's architectural darling Annabelle Selldorf is at it again, joining starchitect row on Bond Street with a contribution at number 10. Neighbors actually like the terra cotta-and-weathered steel facade of the Noho project at Lafayette Street, which is topped with a trellis. Developed by triumvirate SK Development, Ironstate Development and the Chetrit Group, the currently-under-construction corner site will eventually house 11 apartments, which start at around $4.5 million. Four are in contract already, and the building is scheduled to be complete in the first quarter of 2015.

10 Bond Street
New York, NY 10012

35. SIMS Municipal Recycling - Annabelle Selldorf

472 2nd Ave, Sunset Park, NY 11215

Sometimes, even buildings that do the dirty work get a little love from starchitects. Selldorf designed the SIMS Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility, which boasted a budget of $89 million and is LEED certified, in part because 98 percent of the complex is made out of recycled steel. Inside, there's an education center, classrooms, offices, a theater, and a large outdoor terrace with views to Lower Manhattan. New York Times critic Michael Kimmelman described it as "understated, well proportioned and well planned—elegant, actually, and not just for a garbage site." [Photo via Field Condition.]

472 2nd Ave
Sunset Park, NY 11215

36. Reade Chambers - Annabelle Selldorf

71 Reade Street, New York, NY 10007

The 17 condos going up in Tribeca between Duane and Chambers streets will have a distinctly Selldorfian air, at least on the inside, where she's designing the minimalist-yet-classic interiors.

71 Reade Street
New York, NY 10007

37. 347 Bowery - Annabelle Selldorf

347 Bowery, New York, NY 10003

For a while there, it looked like the old Salvation Army residence at the corner of Bowery and East Third Street was going to become a hideous hotel dotted with glowing red tumors. But then developer Urban Muse tapped Annabelle Selldorf for a residential project with five three-bedroom condos and retail at the ground level, and the city breathed a sigh of relief. Well, half a sigh, since fleshed-out renderings haven't materialized and the ridiculous amenity of parking next to your apartment is still up in the air.

347 Bowery
New York, NY 10003

38. Whitney Downtown - Renzo Piano

820 Washington Street, New York, NY 10014

Farther from its October 2011 groundbreaking than to its planned 2015 opening, the Whitney Museum of American Art's new Meatpacking District building is raring to go. Designed by Renzo Piano (of the New York Times building, London's Shard, and so many others), the 200,000-square-foot tiered building along the High Line is also mindbogglingly storm-proof. This timelapse video is slightly outdated, but there's a pretty awesome live stream of the construction site that allows interested parties to track the museum's progress over the last three years... and check back on it every day, if that's something one wishes to do.

820 Washington Street
New York, NY 10014

39. Columbia Science Center - Renzo Piano

Broadway & West 129th Street, New York, NY 10027

Columbia University's 10-story Jerome L. Greene Science Center is currently rising near Broadway and 125th Street and will eventually house an assortment of scientists who study the mind and brain. The first bit of the school's new Manhattanville campus to be built in real life, the project was first announced in 2010, with the Italian Priker Prize-winner was anointed its architect from the beginning. Perhaps the eventual tenants of the ivory tower should study his brain when their labs are all set up?

Broadway & West 129th Street
New York, NY 10027

40. MoMA Expansion - Diller Scofidio + Renfro

11 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019

Known for their work on artistic and cultural sites (see Lincoln Center, among other places), Diller Scofidio + Renfro is responsible for the Museum of Modern Art's controversial Midtown expansion. Controversial, because building more gallery and exhibition space, a performance venue, and a retractable glass wall, plus opening the sculpture garden to the public, comes at the cost of demolishing the bronze-facaded former American Folk Art Museum. Neighbors were not fans of DS+R's glassy design, but construction is slated begin this year and last until 2018 or 2019.

11 W 53rd St
New York, NY 10019

41. Culture Shed - Diller Scofidio + Renfro

New York, NY 10013

A caveat: The giant Culture Shed, meant to be the epicenter of artistic life at West Side mini-city Hudson Yards, is not set to open till 2017—and that's optimistic—so renderings for it are by default preliminary. (Especially because the issue of, oh, financing is still up in the air.) But Diller Scofidio + Renfro and the Rockwell group have ambitious architectural plans for the High Line-adjacent site at 30th Street and Eleventh Avenue, meant to house flexible spaces for performances and installations. Flexible, meaning that the canopies are designed to expand and contract to enlarge or shrink the building as needed.

42. Columbia University - Diller Scofidio + Renfro

3022 Broadway, New York, NY 10027

Alongside Renzo Piano, DS+R is also tackling buildings for Columbia's omnipresent expansion. Both the business school (pictured) and the medical school structures feature crazy cascading towers. The Observer called the 14-story tower for the med school "the craziest building in Harlem." When it's built, that is.

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027