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A Guide to All the Megaprojects Transforming New York City

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New development is occurring at a breakneck pace throughout New York City, and while much of it is happening on the individual level, a not-inconsequential portion of it is also lumped into megaprojects rising in sync all over the five boroughs. Entire stretches of land are giving rise to new and recreated neighborhoods, as seen with Hudson Yards and Hunters Point South, while other swaths are being appropriated and totally reimagined, like with the planned Red Hook Tech Complex and Cornell Tech's Roosevelt Island campus. These megaprojects will not only bring many thousands of apartments—both priced at and below market rate—to the city, but they'll also bring along new cultural attractions, retail, and all the hype that has wooed people to New York City from time immemorial.


· Revenge of the Megaprojects archives [Curbed]

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1. World Trade Center

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1 World Trade Ctr
New York, NY 10007

The redevelopment of the World Trade Center is likely the most arduous, complex, drawn-out megaproject in the city. Rebuilding the tragic site has been fraught with everything from funding troubles (3 WTC), architect switches (2 WTC), and perennial delays (Santiago Calatrava's skeletal winged transportation hub). But 13.5 years after 9/11, the symbolic 1,776-foot-tall 1 World Trade Center, 4 World Trade Center, 7 World Trade Center, and the 9/11 memorial and museum are all open. Status report: 3 World Trade Center has started rising again, 2 World Trade Center is in tenant talks; the park at the complex's southern end with a small church is under construction. One World Observatory atop 1WTC is opening in May, and Calatrava's $4 billion PATH station is also set to get operational this year. The performing arts center is still looking for an architect, and funding, but we can't win 'em all, can we? [Image via World Trade Center Progress]

2. Riverside Center

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1 West End Avenue
New York, NY 10023

Riverside Center is an eight-acre development rising on an old industrial lot and exposed railyard between 59th and 61st streets on the west side waterfront. The whole five-tower project, conceived by developer Extell along with Dermot Campany, has been pocked by uncertainty from the get-go, with original master planner Christian de Portzamparc eventually being swapped out for individual building developers. Two of the project's five towers are under construction, including Silverstein and Elad's noted "poor door building," and SLCE's 43-story, 616-rental building at 21 West End Avenue.

3. Hudson Yards

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This 28-acre megadevelopment is the product of a 2005 rezoning that paved the way for Special Hudson Yards District. Ten years later, the 33 projects that will comprise the new neighborhood are finally beginning to rise. The megaproject is a collaboration between a slew of developers including Related, Moinian Group, and Tishman Speyer, with towers designed by the likes of the project's master planners, Kohn Pedersen Fox, as well as David Childs of SOM, FXFOWLE, BKSK, and Diller Scofidio + Renfro with David Rockwell, to name a few. When complete, Hudson Yards will stretch between 30th and 41st streets and Tenth and Eleventh avenues, and be comprised of a mix of residential, office space, retail, and community space. It will also be served by a functioning 7 train extension—fingers crossed.

4. Manhattan West

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10th Avenue & West 31st Street
New York, NY 10001

Manhattan West, a much smaller (yet still really big) development bounded by West 32nd and 33rd street and Ninth and Tenth avenues, will rise just east of Hudson Yards. The 5.4 million-square-foot office-hotel-retail-residential development is being spearheaded by Brookfield and will have a 64-story SOM-designed residential tower, a "breezeway" connecting the development to the High Line and two 65-story office towers. Like Hudson Yards, Manhattan West is also being constructed over the west side rail yards.

5. Essex Crossing

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Ludlow Street
New York, NY 10002

The Seward Park Urban Renewal Area's Moses-era legacy of failure will finally be left behind with Essex Crossing. The 1.65 million-square-foot project will rise on the largest swath of undeveloped land south of 96th Street, and will include 1,000 apartments in buildings designed by SHoP, Handel, Beyer Blinder Belle, and Dattner. The development will also include a Regal movie theater, a new and improved Essex Street Market, a bowling alley, and a cultural space that will no longer be occupied by the Andy Warhol Museum (sad face). Despite its increased density, the development will include no parking.

6. Cornell Tech Campus

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Roosevelt Island
New York, NY

Ivy league university Cornell is bringing a glassy, sustainable, public-space-prioritizing tech campus to a southern portion of Roosevelt Island. The multi-use development will cover 2 million square feet and include academic and residential buildings, a hotel, and a "tech walk," or central campus. Although it sounds like a good excuse to visit the curious island, that trip will have to wait: the whole project won't be complete for 20 years.

7. Flushing Commons

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After a decade of delays, a giant municipal parking lot at the corner of 39th Avenue and 138th Street is finally giving rise to Flushing Commons. The 1.8 million-square-foot megaproject will bring 600 apartments, a YMCA, a 1,000-space underground parking garage, 1.5 acres of open space, and 350,000-square-feet of commercial space to the area. The first phase broke ground in July of 2014, and the whole shebang is expected to be complete by 2020.

8. Willets Point, NY

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Sterling Equities and Related Companies plan to totally remake the 23-acre area surrounding Citi Field in a $3 billion overhaul that will include a ginormous mall with a rooftop garden, a 160,000-square-foot convention center, a 25-story residential building, and 6,000 parking spots. A building that will be dedicated to affordable housing for seniors will break ground later this year, but don't expect this whole development to be complete any time soon.

9. Astoria Cove

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1st St. and 26th Ave
Queens, NY 11102

The 1,723-apartment development on the Astoria waterfront got the green light from the city in November after a lot of back and forth regarding its affordable housing component and use of unionized labor (there will be 460 affordable apartments and all labor will be unionized). Other than housing, the mixed-use development will have a ferry dock, a grocery store and a public school. Alma Realty is developing.

10. Hunters Point South

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1-50 50th Avenue
Queens, NY 11101

A 30-acre swath of Long Island City waterfront is giving way to Hunters Point South, a mixed-use development with a focus on affordable housing; the largest such development to be built in the city since the 1970s. Of the 5,000 units included in the 20-project development, well over half will be priced below market rate. The development will bring a school, retail, restaurants, and a waterfront park to the long-desolate area.

11. Greenpoint Landing

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21 Commercial Street
Brooklyn, NY 11222

Greenpoint's 22-acre redevelopment project will transform the industrial north Brooklyn waterfront into...something else. The megaproject will stretch between Green and Box streets, and will be comprised of 10 buildings containing a whopping 5,000 apartments (1,400 of which will be priced below market rate), a 640-seat elementary school, retail space, and a resilient waterfront park. Construction started in July, but the project as a whole isn't expected to be complete for another 8 to 10 years.

12. Domino Sugar Refinery

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316 Kent Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11249

The Domino Sugar Refinery is the face of megaprojects in New York City at the moment. SHoP replaced Rafael Viñoly as project architect in March 2013. Their plan for the site will bring five towers with 2,300 apartments—700 of which will be priced below market rate—and 631,000-square-feet of office space to the South Williamsburg waterfront. SHoP is also teaming up with prolific landscape architect James Corner Field Operations to reshape the waterfront greenery. The project is being led by the developers who are credited with the recreating Dumbo, Two Trees.

13. Rheingold Brewery

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10 Montieth Street
Brooklyn, NY 11206

Bushwick's former Rheingold Brewery site—bounded by Bushwick and Evergreen avenues and Flushing Avenue and Melrose Street—is being cleared to make way for a 10-building project. The redevelopment of the 6.4-acre site is being steered by Read Property Group, and will bring nearly 1,000 rentals (300 will be affordably-priced), shopping, and a 17,000-square-foot green space to the area. The first of the project's developments will break ground this summer.

14. City Point

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To the northeast of Pacific Park is Downtown Brooklyn's City Point, the mixed-use development rising around Flatbush Avenue Extension and Fulton Street that replaces the unsightly Albee Square Mall and parking garage. The development—the brainchild of Acadia Realty Trust—will include a retail component with rumored tenants like an Alamo Drafthouse Cinema and CityTarget, and at least 700 apartments spread over three buildings. The first of City Point's residential towers have already topped out, and pave the way for Extell to begin their residential tower, which may become Brooklyn's tallest.

15. Pacific Park

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535 Carlton Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11238

The megaproject formerly known as Atlantic Yards has already partly come to fruition with the opening of Barclay's Center, but much of the 22-acre development is still underway. Included in the Frank Gehry-designed master plan are 16 additional buildings bringing 6,430 new apartments (2,250 of which will be priced below market rate) to Prospect Heights. Developer Greenland Forest City Ratner has tapped firms like COOKFOX and SHoP to design the megaproject's residential buildings. In addition to the arena and apartments, Pacific Park will bring commercial and retail space and an eight-acre park to the area. Greenland Forest City Ratner expects the massive development will be complete by 2025, which means area residents better brace for some seriously long-winded construction unpleasantries.

16. Red Hook Tech Complex

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Wolcott Street & Ferris Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231

Although this megaproject is still in its fledgling planning stages, Italian developer Est4te Four is already buying up property to create a 1.1 million-square-foot waterfront complex devoted to tech industries in an area bounded by Coffey and Wolcott streets, and Ferris Street and New York Harbor in Red Hook. In October, a set of renderings for the waterfront complex appeared out of thin air along with claims that the complex will take over several pre-war brick buildings, and add space with glass toppers.

17. Industry City

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882 3rd Ave Unit 12
Brooklyn, NY 11232
(718) 965-6450
Visit Website

Industry City will undergo a $1 billion revamp at the behest of developers Jamestown Properties, Belvedere Capital, and Angelo Gordon that will bring a hotel, retail and tons of space for tech startups to the 16-building hub. The redevelopment won't include housing.

18. New York Wheel + Empire Outlets

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1 Bay St
Staten Island, NY 10301
(718) 815-2628
Visit Website

The northern tip of Staten Island in St. George is poised for change; change in the form of one really giant observation wheel and a bunch of outlet stores. The Staten Island Observation Wheel will be the tallest in the world at 630 feet—that is, only until it's surpassed by Dubai's planned 690-foot wheel. Alongside the wheel will rise Empire Outlets, a 125-store complex that broke ground last month.

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1. World Trade Center

1 World Trade Ctr, New York, NY 10007

The redevelopment of the World Trade Center is likely the most arduous, complex, drawn-out megaproject in the city. Rebuilding the tragic site has been fraught with everything from funding troubles (3 WTC), architect switches (2 WTC), and perennial delays (Santiago Calatrava's skeletal winged transportation hub). But 13.5 years after 9/11, the symbolic 1,776-foot-tall 1 World Trade Center, 4 World Trade Center, 7 World Trade Center, and the 9/11 memorial and museum are all open. Status report: 3 World Trade Center has started rising again, 2 World Trade Center is in tenant talks; the park at the complex's southern end with a small church is under construction. One World Observatory atop 1WTC is opening in May, and Calatrava's $4 billion PATH station is also set to get operational this year. The performing arts center is still looking for an architect, and funding, but we can't win 'em all, can we? [Image via World Trade Center Progress]

1 World Trade Ctr
New York, NY 10007

2. Riverside Center

1 West End Avenue, New York, NY 10023

Riverside Center is an eight-acre development rising on an old industrial lot and exposed railyard between 59th and 61st streets on the west side waterfront. The whole five-tower project, conceived by developer Extell along with Dermot Campany, has been pocked by uncertainty from the get-go, with original master planner Christian de Portzamparc eventually being swapped out for individual building developers. Two of the project's five towers are under construction, including Silverstein and Elad's noted "poor door building," and SLCE's 43-story, 616-rental building at 21 West End Avenue.

1 West End Avenue
New York, NY 10023

3. Hudson Yards

New York, NY 10013

This 28-acre megadevelopment is the product of a 2005 rezoning that paved the way for Special Hudson Yards District. Ten years later, the 33 projects that will comprise the new neighborhood are finally beginning to rise. The megaproject is a collaboration between a slew of developers including Related, Moinian Group, and Tishman Speyer, with towers designed by the likes of the project's master planners, Kohn Pedersen Fox, as well as David Childs of SOM, FXFOWLE, BKSK, and Diller Scofidio + Renfro with David Rockwell, to name a few. When complete, Hudson Yards will stretch between 30th and 41st streets and Tenth and Eleventh avenues, and be comprised of a mix of residential, office space, retail, and community space. It will also be served by a functioning 7 train extension—fingers crossed.

4. Manhattan West

10th Avenue & West 31st Street, New York, NY 10001

Manhattan West, a much smaller (yet still really big) development bounded by West 32nd and 33rd street and Ninth and Tenth avenues, will rise just east of Hudson Yards. The 5.4 million-square-foot office-hotel-retail-residential development is being spearheaded by Brookfield and will have a 64-story SOM-designed residential tower, a "breezeway" connecting the development to the High Line and two 65-story office towers. Like Hudson Yards, Manhattan West is also being constructed over the west side rail yards.

10th Avenue & West 31st Street
New York, NY 10001

5. Essex Crossing

Ludlow Street, New York, NY 10002

The Seward Park Urban Renewal Area's Moses-era legacy of failure will finally be left behind with Essex Crossing. The 1.65 million-square-foot project will rise on the largest swath of undeveloped land south of 96th Street, and will include 1,000 apartments in buildings designed by SHoP, Handel, Beyer Blinder Belle, and Dattner. The development will also include a Regal movie theater, a new and improved Essex Street Market, a bowling alley, and a cultural space that will no longer be occupied by the Andy Warhol Museum (sad face). Despite its increased density, the development will include no parking.

Ludlow Street
New York, NY 10002

6. Cornell Tech Campus

Roosevelt Island, New York, NY

Ivy league university Cornell is bringing a glassy, sustainable, public-space-prioritizing tech campus to a southern portion of Roosevelt Island. The multi-use development will cover 2 million square feet and include academic and residential buildings, a hotel, and a "tech walk," or central campus. Although it sounds like a good excuse to visit the curious island, that trip will have to wait: the whole project won't be complete for 20 years.

Roosevelt Island
New York, NY

7. Flushing Commons

Queens, NY

After a decade of delays, a giant municipal parking lot at the corner of 39th Avenue and 138th Street is finally giving rise to Flushing Commons. The 1.8 million-square-foot megaproject will bring 600 apartments, a YMCA, a 1,000-space underground parking garage, 1.5 acres of open space, and 350,000-square-feet of commercial space to the area. The first phase broke ground in July of 2014, and the whole shebang is expected to be complete by 2020.

8. Willets Point, NY

Willets Point, NY 11368

Sterling Equities and Related Companies plan to totally remake the 23-acre area surrounding Citi Field in a $3 billion overhaul that will include a ginormous mall with a rooftop garden, a 160,000-square-foot convention center, a 25-story residential building, and 6,000 parking spots. A building that will be dedicated to affordable housing for seniors will break ground later this year, but don't expect this whole development to be complete any time soon.

9. Astoria Cove

1st St. and 26th Ave, Queens, NY 11102

The 1,723-apartment development on the Astoria waterfront got the green light from the city in November after a lot of back and forth regarding its affordable housing component and use of unionized labor (there will be 460 affordable apartments and all labor will be unionized). Other than housing, the mixed-use development will have a ferry dock, a grocery store and a public school. Alma Realty is developing.

1st St. and 26th Ave
Queens, NY 11102

10. Hunters Point South

1-50 50th Avenue, Queens, NY 11101

A 30-acre swath of Long Island City waterfront is giving way to Hunters Point South, a mixed-use development with a focus on affordable housing; the largest such development to be built in the city since the 1970s. Of the 5,000 units included in the 20-project development, well over half will be priced below market rate. The development will bring a school, retail, restaurants, and a waterfront park to the long-desolate area.

1-50 50th Avenue
Queens, NY 11101

11. Greenpoint Landing

21 Commercial Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222

Greenpoint's 22-acre redevelopment project will transform the industrial north Brooklyn waterfront into...something else. The megaproject will stretch between Green and Box streets, and will be comprised of 10 buildings containing a whopping 5,000 apartments (1,400 of which will be priced below market rate), a 640-seat elementary school, retail space, and a resilient waterfront park. Construction started in July, but the project as a whole isn't expected to be complete for another 8 to 10 years.

21 Commercial Street
Brooklyn, NY 11222

12. Domino Sugar Refinery

316 Kent Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11249

The Domino Sugar Refinery is the face of megaprojects in New York City at the moment. SHoP replaced Rafael Viñoly as project architect in March 2013. Their plan for the site will bring five towers with 2,300 apartments—700 of which will be priced below market rate—and 631,000-square-feet of office space to the South Williamsburg waterfront. SHoP is also teaming up with prolific landscape architect James Corner Field Operations to reshape the waterfront greenery. The project is being led by the developers who are credited with the recreating Dumbo, Two Trees.

316 Kent Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11249

13. Rheingold Brewery

10 Montieth Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Bushwick's former Rheingold Brewery site—bounded by Bushwick and Evergreen avenues and Flushing Avenue and Melrose Street—is being cleared to make way for a 10-building project. The redevelopment of the 6.4-acre site is being steered by Read Property Group, and will bring nearly 1,000 rentals (300 will be affordably-priced), shopping, and a 17,000-square-foot green space to the area. The first of the project's developments will break ground this summer.

10 Montieth Street
Brooklyn, NY 11206

14. City Point

Brooklyn, NY 11201

To the northeast of Pacific Park is Downtown Brooklyn's City Point, the mixed-use development rising around Flatbush Avenue Extension and Fulton Street that replaces the unsightly Albee Square Mall and parking garage. The development—the brainchild of Acadia Realty Trust—will include a retail component with rumored tenants like an Alamo Drafthouse Cinema and CityTarget, and at least 700 apartments spread over three buildings. The first of City Point's residential towers have already topped out, and pave the way for Extell to begin their residential tower, which may become Brooklyn's tallest.

15. Pacific Park

535 Carlton Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11238

The megaproject formerly known as Atlantic Yards has already partly come to fruition with the opening of Barclay's Center, but much of the 22-acre development is still underway. Included in the Frank Gehry-designed master plan are 16 additional buildings bringing 6,430 new apartments (2,250 of which will be priced below market rate) to Prospect Heights. Developer Greenland Forest City Ratner has tapped firms like COOKFOX and SHoP to design the megaproject's residential buildings. In addition to the arena and apartments, Pacific Park will bring commercial and retail space and an eight-acre park to the area. Greenland Forest City Ratner expects the massive development will be complete by 2025, which means area residents better brace for some seriously long-winded construction unpleasantries.

535 Carlton Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11238

16. Red Hook Tech Complex

Wolcott Street & Ferris Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231

Although this megaproject is still in its fledgling planning stages, Italian developer Est4te Four is already buying up property to create a 1.1 million-square-foot waterfront complex devoted to tech industries in an area bounded by Coffey and Wolcott streets, and Ferris Street and New York Harbor in Red Hook. In October, a set of renderings for the waterfront complex appeared out of thin air along with claims that the complex will take over several pre-war brick buildings, and add space with glass toppers.

Wolcott Street & Ferris Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231

17. Industry City

882 3rd Ave Unit 12, Brooklyn, NY 11232

Industry City will undergo a $1 billion revamp at the behest of developers Jamestown Properties, Belvedere Capital, and Angelo Gordon that will bring a hotel, retail and tons of space for tech startups to the 16-building hub. The redevelopment won't include housing.

882 3rd Ave Unit 12
Brooklyn, NY 11232

18. New York Wheel + Empire Outlets

1 Bay St, Staten Island, NY 10301

The northern tip of Staten Island in St. George is poised for change; change in the form of one really giant observation wheel and a bunch of outlet stores. The Staten Island Observation Wheel will be the tallest in the world at 630 feet—that is, only until it's surpassed by Dubai's planned 690-foot wheel. Alongside the wheel will rise Empire Outlets, a 125-store complex that broke ground last month.

1 Bay St
Staten Island, NY 10301