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A boy in outdoor winter clothing crosses a city street. The building in the background has a sign that reads Radio City.
Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York.
TM & Copyright ©20th Century Fox Film Corp./Everett Collection

The definitive guide to ‘Home Alone 2’ filming locations in NYC

The Christmas classic was filmed all over Manhattan

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Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York.
| TM & Copyright ©20th Century Fox Film Corp./Everett Collection

Home Alone 2: Lost in New York is one of those sequels that very well might live up to, or even surpass, its progenitor. Why? Instead of taking place in the suburbs of Chicago, the beloved 1992 classic is a romp around the holiday season's most festive city: New York.

In the John Hughes-Chris Columbus collaboration, Macaulay Culkin returns as maligned youngest child Kevin McCallister, separated from his family once again during what's supposed to be the happiest time of the year. Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern are back as bad guys Harry and Marv, recently escaped from prison and out to steal some cash from a toy store on Christmas—before they run into Kevin in the Big Apple and decide to seek revenge from the precocious kid's prior-year high jinks instead.

From the Plaza and Central Park to the World Trade Center and an under-renovation townhouse, what follows is the ultimate geographic guide to where Home Alone 2 is set across New York City. And hey: Merry Christmas, ya filthy animals.

This map was originally published in 2014; it has been updated with the latest information.

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LaGuardia Airport

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Our first glimpse of New York City is through the window of LaGuardia Airport. Kevin gets separated from his family at O'Hare, digging through his dad's carry-on for batteries. (Those were for his super-blocky Talkboy tape recorder.) When he looks up, he'd lost them, and follows another man in a tan coat onto a plane bound for LGA rather than MIA. Kevin asks an airport staffer, "This is an emergency. What city is that over there?" The answer: "That's New York, sir." Kevin: "Yikes, I did it again."

Pepsi-Cola Sign

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At the airport, Kevin looks out at Long Island City's Pepsi-Cola sign and the East River skyline, and the screen flashes to and from various cityscape shots. We get a sense of the enormity of the place and the tiny-ness of this child. At first, Kevin says nervously, "Oh no, my family's in Florida and I'm in New York." Then he smiles. "My family's in Florida. I'm in New York." Eyebrow raise. It's go time.

Queensboro Bridge

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Kevin still has his dad's carry-on, and in it, a credit card and an envelope of cash. Obviously, that means a yellow cab into the city, via the Queensboro Bridge. Grinning, Kevin leans out the rear window in his striped winter hat, and you get the feeling that his Ferris Bueller's Day Off is about to begin.

Radio City Music Hall

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In addition to his recorder, Kevin also has a Polaroid camera. First things first: he hits up the sights. Back in the suburbs of Chicago, remember, he said: "Who wants to spend Christmas in a tropical climate anyway? … If I had my own money, I'd go on my own vacation. Alone, without any of you guys. And I'd have the most fun of my whole life." Up first, Radio City Music Hall.

Empire Diner

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Somehow, Kevin moseys by the Empire Diner in Chelsea—which is still around, 25 years later—and picks up a flier from a Santa on stilts.

Tribeca TV Festival Welcome Party Hosted By AT&T Photo by Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tribeca TV Festival

Quong Yuen Shing & Co.

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At this store on Mott Street in Chinatown (which is now closed), Kevin picks up two packs of firecrackers. Pro tip: when unexpectedly left unsupervised, it's a great idea to buy something explosive.

A boy, a man, and a woman all in outdoor winter clothing are outside of a shop. The sign on the shop reads Quong Yuen Shing and Co.

Battery Park

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Then it's down to Battery Park, where Kevin gazes out at the harbor through those old-school binoculars.

Statue of Liberty

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Naturally, he sees Lady Liberty through those lenses. Super symbolic, because you see, he is free of his family. Not lost in New York, but independent and having a grand old time.

World Trade Center

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Kevin marches up the steps to the old World Trade Center complex, nine years before it would be no more. He goes to the observation deck of the south tower and photographs the vistas from it. You get the sense, again, that this is a smart-yet-naive Midwestern kid having a fun day out but at the same time getting a little bit awed by the big city even from so many stories up.

A boy in outdoor winter clothing walks up snow-covered stairs towards a group of large buildings.

Fulton Fish Market

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At the Miami airport, security tells Kevin's parents it's unlikely he'll be anywhere but still stuck in Chicago. The camera pans to the South Street Seaport's erstwhile Fulton Fish Market (which moved to Hunts Point in 2005). A backpack-toting Kevin crosses the street; meanwhile a white truck makes a turn, honks at him, and rolls up the back to reveal Harry and Marv. They're recently out of prison and stowing away with a shipment of seafood on ice.

A black and white photo of a building used to store fish.
The old Fulton Fish Market in lower Manhattan.
Photo by David Handschuh/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images

57 Street Subway Station

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Harry and Marv evade the dead fish and find their way to Midtown via the N/Q subway line, discussing their plan to get some cash in order to procure fake passports and flee to South America. Marv supports changing their nickname from the Wet Bandits (so called because they used to leave the water on in houses they robbed) to the Sticky Bandits. He plunges a tape-covered hand into a streetside Salvation Army bucket. Counters Harry: "You bust out of jail to rob 14 cents from a Santy Claus?"

Two men walk up the stairs out of a Subway station. The sign above the entryway to the station reads Q.

Central Park

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Kevin meets the Pigeon Lady the first time he steps foot in the park, but many crucial moments take place here, most either down near Wollman Rink and Central Park South, or up by the Upper West Side and the 96th Street Transverse. During his first visit, though, he encounters the Pigeon Lady and bolts.

A path in a park with trees arching overhead. There are leaves on the ground and fences on either side of the pathway. Shutterstock

Grand Army Plaza

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Kevin is coming from the park, headed to his accommodation for the night. The statue at Grand Army Plaza points the way across the street to the hotel. Crossing the busy intersection here, at 59th Street, is where Marv and Harry first (literally) bump into Kevin.

An open plaza in the middle of a crowded city. There is a gold statue in the middle of the plaza. Shutterstock

The Plaza

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Before leaving Chicago, Kevin had heard a commercial touting "the world-renowned Plaza Hotel, New York's most exciting hotel experience." Naturally, he heads there, with his dad's credit card in hand. With some conniving he's able to get a sweet suite (No. 411, for anyone keeping track). The kid gets a giant bed and bathroom, orders an ice cream sundae bar via room service, and does cannonballs into the hotel pool, all while trying to convince hotel staff that his dad is actually with him. It's in the suite where he watches a parody of the James Cagney/Humphrey Bogart movie Angels With Dirty Faces, in which this signature line appears: "Merry Christmas, you filthy animal. And a Happy New Year."

A group of large city buildings. There is a street in front of the buildings with yellow taxi cabs. Shutterstock.com

Wollman Rink

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Harry and Marv are by Wollman Rink, at the southern end of Central Park. Marv is skating (and falling) while Harry is reading the paper and plotting how to get some cash. During the holidays, Harry says, "the only stores that are going to have cash on hand are those that deal in moderate priced goods." He points to a full-page ad for Duncan's Toy Chest. "There's nobody dumb enough to knock off a toy store on Christmas Eve," Harry jibes. Marv answers, "Oh, yes there is," and gestures to both of them.

Central Park wollman rink Shutterstock

Duncan’s Toy Chest

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As soon as Kevin's settled, he finagles a limousine with a side of hot cheese pizza, calling the driver from the backseat to inquire about a good toy store. He ends up at Duncan's Toy Chest, the kiddie wonderland that's decorated to the nines for Christmas and sports a kindly gray-haired owner. In real life, Duncan's is meant to be FAO Schwarz. (Though since FAO is across the street from the Plaza, he could have just walked; also, the actual building with this facade is in Chicago, so the geography is all messed up.) Kevin purchases a map of New York, green slime goo, and a Swiss Army knife. It all cost $23.75. Harry and Marv are also inside the store, scoping out their hiding places inside playhouses advance of the Christmas Eve heist. They see Kevin outside and recognize his backpack. A chase begins!

The exterior of a toy store. The sign above the entrance reads Duncan’s Toy Chest. There is a window with many toys on display.

Van Cleef & Arpels

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Kevin springs by the Van Cleef and Arpels store on Fifth Avenue, and hurriedly stops to buy a few necklaces off a street vendor. He rips them apart, so Harry and Marv trip on the beads.

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Bethesda Fountain

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Kevin tries to escape to the Plaza, but the staff has caught on that the credit card he used to pay for the room was stolen and want to kick him out. Harry and Marv are waiting by the loading dock when Kevin flees the hotel. Marv lets their plan about the toy store and South America slip. After Kevin wriggles away from the Wet Bandits, the duo chases Kevin to Bethesda Fountain in Central Park—a long way to run, mind you. When they lose him, Marv reassures Harry: "This time, he doesn't have a house full of dangerous goodies to get us with. He's in the park. He's alone. Kids are scared of the park." (Remember, it was the ’90s.) Harry responds: "Yeah, grown men come into the park and don't leave alive. Good luck, little fella."

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Carnegie Hall

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The Pigeon Lady (we never do learn her real name) takes Kevin to some secret rooftop spot at Carnegie Hall, full of disused instruments, mannequins, and old chandeliers, and they hear a rendition of "O Come All Ye Faithful." The two of them bond over being invisible to the world; her because she's homeless, and him because he is the youngest. She reminds him that good deeds can replace bad ones, and that he can make up for running away but, basically, saving the day.

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St. Anne's Hospital for Children

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Kevin stops by the fictional St. Anne's Hospital for Children, the charity to which all of Duncan's Toy Chest's proceeds from Christmas Eve day go. (The facade is an actual building in Harlem.) Kevin is empowered and emboldened: "You can mess with a lot of things, but you can't mess with kids on Christmas."

A large building with many windows at night. The sign on the building reads St. Anne’s Hospital for Children.

Rob McAllister’s House

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Kevin's uncle Rob and aunt Georgette have a townhouse on 95th Street between Central Park West and Columbus Avenue. He finds the address in his dad's contacts, which were in the backpack, but after seeking refuge there earlier, realizes that no one is home and the house is undergoing a gut renovation. This brownstone is where Kevin leads Harry and Marv the night of the toy store robbery in order to test the limits of physical comedy for a PG movie by enacting all kinds of bodily harm upon the hapless villains.

A row of townhouses with stairs leading up to various entrances. There are winter holiday decorations on several of the houses.

“In the park”

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Kevin makes a 911 call from an Upper West Side phone booth and tells the dispatcher that the thieves who robbed Duncan's Toy Chest will be in the park at 95th Street. "Look for fireworks. They've got a gun." Then he slips on ice, and the dastardly duo walks him into the park. Ultimately, the Pigeon Lady throws feed onto the very sticky Sticky Bandits, swarms of pigeons peck away, and Kevin is able to set off fireworks to alert the police to their presence. In the bag of stolen money, he leaves Polaroids of the guys at the toy store as well as the tape recording of Marv explaining the plan. The money is delivered to the hospital as intended, and Mr. Duncan finds out Kevin was responsible.

A boy in outdoor winter clothing stands at a payphone with the phone to his ear. It is night and in the background are city lights.

Times Square

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By this point, all the McAllisters are in New York. The Plaza feels so guilty that its staffers scared Kevin off because of the credit card fraud that they give the family a free penthouse suite (No. 1765). Kevin's mom, played by Catherine O'Hara, hopped a taxi to Times Square after first checking the uncle's house, right before Kevin arrived to give the Sticky Bandits what for. Mom says to strangers, "I'm looking for my son," showing photos of him and knocking on the door of a police car. The officer advises: "Put yourself in your kids' shoes. Where would you go? What would you do?" Kate says: "Dear God, I know where he is. I need to get to Rockefeller Center." The NYPD officer: "Hop in."

Times Square at night. There are multiple lit billboards and many cars.

Rockefeller Center

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After emerging victorious over Marv and Harry, Kevin heads to the iconic giant tree. Then he talks to it: "I know I don't deserve a Christmas, even though I did a good deed. I don't want any presents. Instead I want to take back every mean thing I ever said to my family. ... Could I just see my mother? I just want my mother." And then, because of the magic of movies, his mom shows up. "Kevin!" she cries. Kevin mutters, "Wow, that worked fast. … How did you know I was here?" Mrs. McA: "Well, I know you and Christmas trees, and this was the biggest one around." They return to the Plaza. It starts to snow. Meanwhile, trucks unload dozens of toys as tokens of thanks from Duncan's Toy Chest, and Kevin gives a turtle dove ornament to the Pigeon Lady as a sign of eternal friendship. Then his dad bellows something about a $967.43 room service bill. (Dads.) That familiar, heart-wrenching refrain that's part of the score—"Somewhere In My Memory—starts to play. As Kevin says, "Don't you know a kid always wins against two idiots?"

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LaGuardia Airport

Our first glimpse of New York City is through the window of LaGuardia Airport. Kevin gets separated from his family at O'Hare, digging through his dad's carry-on for batteries. (Those were for his super-blocky Talkboy tape recorder.) When he looks up, he'd lost them, and follows another man in a tan coat onto a plane bound for LGA rather than MIA. Kevin asks an airport staffer, "This is an emergency. What city is that over there?" The answer: "That's New York, sir." Kevin: "Yikes, I did it again."

Pepsi-Cola Sign

At the airport, Kevin looks out at Long Island City's Pepsi-Cola sign and the East River skyline, and the screen flashes to and from various cityscape shots. We get a sense of the enormity of the place and the tiny-ness of this child. At first, Kevin says nervously, "Oh no, my family's in Florida and I'm in New York." Then he smiles. "My family's in Florida. I'm in New York." Eyebrow raise. It's go time.

Queensboro Bridge

Kevin still has his dad's carry-on, and in it, a credit card and an envelope of cash. Obviously, that means a yellow cab into the city, via the Queensboro Bridge. Grinning, Kevin leans out the rear window in his striped winter hat, and you get the feeling that his Ferris Bueller's Day Off is about to begin.

Radio City Music Hall

In addition to his recorder, Kevin also has a Polaroid camera. First things first: he hits up the sights. Back in the suburbs of Chicago, remember, he said: "Who wants to spend Christmas in a tropical climate anyway? … If I had my own money, I'd go on my own vacation. Alone, without any of you guys. And I'd have the most fun of my whole life." Up first, Radio City Music Hall.

Empire Diner

Tribeca TV Festival Welcome Party Hosted By AT&T Photo by Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tribeca TV Festival

Somehow, Kevin moseys by the Empire Diner in Chelsea—which is still around, 25 years later—and picks up a flier from a Santa on stilts.

Tribeca TV Festival Welcome Party Hosted By AT&T Photo by Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tribeca TV Festival

Quong Yuen Shing & Co.

A boy, a man, and a woman all in outdoor winter clothing are outside of a shop. The sign on the shop reads Quong Yuen Shing and Co.

At this store on Mott Street in Chinatown (which is now closed), Kevin picks up two packs of firecrackers. Pro tip: when unexpectedly left unsupervised, it's a great idea to buy something explosive.

A boy, a man, and a woman all in outdoor winter clothing are outside of a shop. The sign on the shop reads Quong Yuen Shing and Co.

Battery Park

Then it's down to Battery Park, where Kevin gazes out at the harbor through those old-school binoculars.

Statue of Liberty

Naturally, he sees Lady Liberty through those lenses. Super symbolic, because you see, he is free of his family. Not lost in New York, but independent and having a grand old time.

World Trade Center

A boy in outdoor winter clothing walks up snow-covered stairs towards a group of large buildings.

Kevin marches up the steps to the old World Trade Center complex, nine years before it would be no more. He goes to the observation deck of the south tower and photographs the vistas from it. You get the sense, again, that this is a smart-yet-naive Midwestern kid having a fun day out but at the same time getting a little bit awed by the big city even from so many stories up.

A boy in outdoor winter clothing walks up snow-covered stairs towards a group of large buildings.

Fulton Fish Market

A black and white photo of a building used to store fish.
The old Fulton Fish Market in lower Manhattan.
Photo by David Handschuh/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images

At the Miami airport, security tells Kevin's parents it's unlikely he'll be anywhere but still stuck in Chicago. The camera pans to the South Street Seaport's erstwhile Fulton Fish Market (which moved to Hunts Point in 2005). A backpack-toting Kevin crosses the street; meanwhile a white truck makes a turn, honks at him, and rolls up the back to reveal Harry and Marv. They're recently out of prison and stowing away with a shipment of seafood on ice.

A black and white photo of a building used to store fish.
The old Fulton Fish Market in lower Manhattan.
Photo by David Handschuh/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images

57 Street Subway Station