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The definitive guide to the Hudson Yards development boom

These projects are in various states of development in the bustling west side neighborhood

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When a 2005 rezoning effort led to the creation of Hudson Yards, it was mostly seen as the domain of developers Related Companies and Oxford Property Group—and now that many components of the megaproject have finally debuted, those developers’ buildings are indeed the linchpin of the surrounding district.

But in the nearly 15 years since the rezoning, plenty of other developers have also cashed in on the neighborhood’s development boom. Brookfield is building its mini-megaproject, Manhattan West, across the street from Hudson Yards; Tishman Speyer is moving forward a supertall office building designed by Bjarke Ingels; and Moinian Group has broken ground on its 940-foot office tower, 3 Hudson Boulevard. And that’s not even mentioning scores of smaller projects in development.

This guide offers a fuller picture of how the rezoning has changed the far west side of Manhattan. To keep it concise, we’ve stuck to the boundaries of the Special Hudson Yards District, which roughly runs from 30th Street to 41st Street between 11th and Eighth Avenues. Some finished projects are included, but the list is largely devoted to projects in the construction or development phases.

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1. 10 Hudson Yards

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10 Hudson Yards 24th Floor, 347 10th Ave
New York, NY 10001
(212) 801-1000
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This office building, designed by KPF and occupied by brands like L’Oreal and Coach, has been open since 2016.

10 Hudson Yards Opening Day Coach

2. 15 Hudson Yards

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11th Ave & W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

One of several residential buildings in the Related-Oxford Hudson Yards complex, 15 Hudson Yards was designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with the Rockwell Group (with Ismael Leyva Architects as the architect of record). Residents, who started moving in earlier this year, have access to posh amenities on the tower’s 50th and 51st floors, which include a coworking area, a private dining room, a screening room, wine storage, a 75-foot swimming pool, a gym curated by the Wright Fit, and even more. (There’s also a sky-high outdoor terrace near the top of the building.)

3. 30 Hudson Yards

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10th Ave & W 33rd St
New York, NY 10001

The tallest of the towers that make up Related's parcel, 30 Hudson Yards began construction in 2015, and is expected to wrap in late 2019. Once complete, the building will rise 1,296 feet and will have tenants like Time Warner Inc., Wells Fargo Securities, and DNB Bank. This tower is being designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox, and will feature Edge, a 1,000-foot-high outdoor observation deck that opens March 11.

4. 35 Hudson Yards

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11th Avenue & West 33rd Street
New York, NY 10001

The mixed-use supertall at 35 Hudson Yards was designed by SOM’s David Childs and stands just over 1,000 feet. It’s home to Equinox’s first concept hotel, along with 143 apartments that will not come cheap. Condos start at $5 million for a two-bedroom, with an average price of $11 million. Amenities include a dedicated fitness center, screening room, kid’s playroom, conference rooms, access to a “comprehensive fitness experience” from Equinox and SoulCycle, and a “director of residences” who can do everything from coordinate laundry service to book a car if you need one.

5. 50 Hudson Yards

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10th Avenue & West 33rd Street
New York, NY 10001

This McDonald’s-replacing tower is still several years away from completion, and will be one of the last projects to finish in Related and Oxford’s first phase of development. The Norman Foster-designed tower, located at the corner of West 34th Street and 10th Avenue, will rise 58 stories and have offices and retail. It will be the city’s fourth largest commercial tower when it’s complete.

Tall buildings and trees. Courtesy of Related-Oxford

6. 55 Hudson Yards

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W 34th St & 11th Ave
New York, NY 10001

This 780-foot office tower is designed by KPF. Its facade—a combination of glass and matte metal—is meant to evoke the architecture of New York’s famed cast-iron building. Tenants began moving into the building in early 2019, and it will be home to firms like Arosa Capital Management; Boies, Schiller & Flexner; Cooley LLP; and Engineers Gate.

7. The Shops and Restaurants at Hudson Yards

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10th Ave & W 31st St
New York, NY 10001

This seven-story retail behemoth will have 25 different restaurants by a host of celebrity chefs including Thomas Keller, David Chang, and José Andrés. Big-name retail in this high-end shopping center includes Neiman Marcus, Coach, and Stuart Weitzman. There will also be an interactive experience by the design firm Snarkitecture. The building was designed by KPF with interiors by Elkus Manfredi.

New York City’s New Hudson Yards Development Boasts Luxury Shopping Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

8. Vessel

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W 34th St & 11th Ave
New York, NY 10001

This Thomas Heatherwick-designed “public landmark”—temporarily called Vessel, but still awaiting its final name—is the centerpiece of the Related megaproject’s five-acre public park. The sculpture, which has 154 interconnecting flights of stairs with 2,500 steps and 80 landings, is free to the public, but can’t be accessed without a timed ticket. The park will have nearly 30,000 native plants, a new entrance to the High Line, a garden with seasonal blooms, and lots of outdoor seating.

9. The Shed

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11th Ave & W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

The most unique feature of this multi-disciplinary arts center is an extendable outer shell—a temperature-, light-, and sound-controlled space that can host of a variety of performances. The six-story performance and exhibition space debuted on April 5 with several notable commissions; it’s currently hosting a retrospective featuring the work of conceptual artist Agnes Denes.

10. The High Line Spur

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555 W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

The High Line Spur—which runs above 30th Street and culminates in a large open space that hovers above Tenth Avenue—finally opened to the public this summer, seven years after the Friends of the High Line, the nonprofit that oversees the park, first revealed designs for it. The Spur also includes a section known as the High Line Plinth, which will feature large-scale art installations; the first one, Simone Leigh’s Brick House, will be on display for the next 18 months.

11. One Manhattan West

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401 9th Ave
New York, NY 10001

The tallest of the structures within the eight-acre Manhattan West megaproject, One Manhattan West is officially open for business. The 995-foot-tall SOM-designed office tower will have 67 stories and 2.1 million square feet of office space. It’s 90 percent leased, with the NHL, the law firm Skadden, Arps, and more signing on for space in the building.

The triple-height, travertine-clad lobby of One Manhattan West is enclosed by glass walls. James M. Hooker / CTC Creative

12. Two Manhattan West

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401 W 31st St
New York, NY 10001

This office tower is part of Brookfield’s larger mini-megaproject, Manhattan West, and the developer officially filed plans for Two Manhattan West in November of 2017. The SOM-designed tower will stand 849-feet-tall and offer up nearly 1.75 million square feet of office space, and may be complete by 2022.

The exterior of a tall building. The facade is glass. Brookfield

13. Pendry Manhattan West

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West 33rd Street
New York, NY

In the Manhattan West megaproject, a new hotel operated by the luxury Pendry brand will open in 2021. The hotel will have 164 rooms, and will be located in a building designed by SOM. Amenities for guests will include a restaurant, terrace, and conference rooms. Construction kicked off in 2018. 

An aerial view of many tall city buildings. Courtesy of Brookfield

14. Moynihan Train Hall

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421 8th Ave
New York, NY 10001
(212) 330-3296
Visit Website

Work is now well underway on the conversion of the James A. Farley Post Office building into the Moynihan Train Hall. Construction kicked off in 2016, and made steady progress last year as the state prepped the site for what will eventually be a 255,000-square-foot train hall with nine platforms and 17 tracks. The train hall is part of the overall redevelopment of Penn Station into the Penn-Farley Complex. A new concourse that connects the post office building to the existing Penn Station opened in 2017.

An aerial view of a train station. Rendering via SOM

15. 3 Hudson Boulevard

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11th Avenue & West 34th Street
New York, NY 10001

Moinian Group’s supertall was supposed to be one of the first buildings to rise at Hudson Yards, but the developer broke ground on the project in November 2017. The developers were waiting for the MTA to finish infrastructure work on the 7 train extension before moving forward. The FXCollaborative-designed tower will rise 940 feet, and will offer nearly 1.85 million square feet of office space, and close to 15,000 square feet of retail.

Tall city buildings along a waterfront in New York City.

16. The Spiral

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435 10th Avenue
New York, NY 10001

Starchitect Bjarke Ingels’s Hudson Yards supertall was first announced in early 2016, and in April 2018, developer Tishman Speyer announced that construction would finally kick off. So far, the 65-story building has one big-name tenant; Pfizer will take up 800,000 square feet. The tower’s atypical design will have a glass facade punctuated by vertical gardens that wrap around the building, making it seem like the structure is twisting.

A group of buildings with glass facades. Courtesy of Tishman Speyer

17. 99 Hudson Boulevard

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99 Hudson Blvd
New York, NY 10001

Tishman Speyer also owns this development site, which has about 1.3 million square feet of buildable space. However, the firm has not moved forward with any plans for the site since announcing its assemblage in 2016.

18. 545 West 37th Street

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545 West 37th Street
New York, NY 10018

The Chetrit Group originally wanted to sell this prime Hudson Yards site, but changed its mind and filed plans for a 46-story building in September 2016. The low-rise buildings on the site have since been demolished. Plans filed with the DOB list CetraRuddy as the architect, and the 622-foot building will have a hotel with 421 rooms, and 131 condos above that. As of December 2018, Chetrit had received an $85 million loan for the project.

A construction site is in the foreground. In the distance are tall city buildings.
This is what the site looked like in November 2017.
Via Google Maps

19. 431 West 33rd Street

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Dyer Avenue
New York, NY

Despite being announced in 2014, this project has yet to get moving. The land is owned by the Port Authority, and in 2014, a developer was willing to pay $115 million for this site and adjacent property. That deal fell through, and in 2016, the agency announced a nine-story building at the site with 24 apartments.

A tall residential building in New York City. Via SLCE.

20. Hyatt Place

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350 West 39th Street
New York, NY 10018

Hotelier Sam Chang paid $112 million for this site back in 2014, and now work is underway on a 25-story, 520-room Hyatt Place hotel, to be dsigned by Gene Kaufman. The hotel topped out in 2018, and Chang secured a refinancing deal for the property in 2019.

A rendering of Hyatt Place. Via Gene Kaufman Architect

21. 451 10th Avenue

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451 10th Avenue
New York, NY 10018

Former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer is partnering with Related Companies on a two-building project at this site and 511 West 35th Street. The developers filed plans for the 1.4 million-square-foot mixed-use development in February 2017. As it stands right now, a 400-unit residential building (it will have some retail and commercial space too) will rise at the corner of West 35th Street and Tenth Avenue. That will be followed by a 950,000-square-foot office tower at West 35th Street and Hudson Boulevard East.

A block in New York City with an empty lot.

22. 520 West 41st Street

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520 West 41st Street
New York, NY 10036

Silverstein Properties once planned a 1,100-foot tower at this site. That plan was officially scrapped in favor of two smaller buildings in January 2017. Silverstein filed plans for one of the two towers—at 520 West 41st Street—in 2017, but as of now, no plans seem to exist for the site.

A group of tall city buildings along a waterfront.
A previous rendering for the site.
Oppenheim Architecture + Design via Crain’s

23. 360 10th Avenue

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360 10th Avenue
New York, NY 10001

Former Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt purchased this site in 2014 for $167 million. Soon after that, SHoP Architects were brought on board to design a massive residential and retail tower at the site. The project was estimated to cost $3 billion, but work has yet to begin at the site.

A construction site on a city block in New York City.
What the construction site looked like in December 2017.
Via Google Maps

24. 450 11th Avenue

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452 11th Avenue
New York, NY 10018

In April 2016, hotelier David Marx unveiled plans for a Starwood Hotels outpost at this site. The building, which would be located next to the Javits Center, would stand 42 stories tall and have 440 rooms, along with 3,000 square feet of ground floor retail. Two single-story commercial buildings have since been demolished to make room for the new building.

A block with various shops. In the background are tall city buildings. Via Google Maps

25. 476 11th Avenue

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476 11th Ave
New York, NY 10018

After spending $83 million on this site back in 2007, Rockrose Development announced plans for an office and residential complex. The residential component will have 600 apartments, and Rockrose hopes to begin construction this spring. The office tower could span 1.3 million square feet.

A street and a row of tall city buildings. Via Google Maps

26. 480 10th Avenue

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480 10th Ave
New York, NY 10018

A group of tenement buildings at the corner of 10th Avenue and West 37th Street will be transformed into 98 affordable apartments, a 74-seat theater, retail, and the Hell’s Kitchen Community Center. The project is being developed by the Clinton Housing Development Company, and construction is expected to wrap in 2020.

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1. 10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards 24th Floor, 347 10th Ave, New York, NY 10001
10 Hudson Yards Opening Day Coach

This office building, designed by KPF and occupied by brands like L’Oreal and Coach, has been open since 2016.

10 Hudson Yards 24th Floor, 347 10th Ave
New York, NY 10001

2. 15 Hudson Yards

11th Ave & W 30th St, New York, NY 10001

One of several residential buildings in the Related-Oxford Hudson Yards complex, 15 Hudson Yards was designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with the Rockwell Group (with Ismael Leyva Architects as the architect of record). Residents, who started moving in earlier this year, have access to posh amenities on the tower’s 50th and 51st floors, which include a coworking area, a private dining room, a screening room, wine storage, a 75-foot swimming pool, a gym curated by the Wright Fit, and even more. (There’s also a sky-high outdoor terrace near the top of the building.)

11th Ave & W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

3. 30 Hudson Yards

10th Ave & W 33rd St, New York, NY 10001

The tallest of the towers that make up Related's parcel, 30 Hudson Yards began construction in 2015, and is expected to wrap in late 2019. Once complete, the building will rise 1,296 feet and will have tenants like Time Warner Inc., Wells Fargo Securities, and DNB Bank. This tower is being designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox, and will feature Edge, a 1,000-foot-high outdoor observation deck that opens March 11.

10th Ave & W 33rd St
New York, NY 10001

4. 35 Hudson Yards

11th Avenue & West 33rd Street, New York, NY 10001

The mixed-use supertall at 35 Hudson Yards was designed by SOM’s David Childs and stands just over 1,000 feet. It’s home to Equinox’s first concept hotel, along with 143 apartments that will not come cheap. Condos start at $5 million for a two-bedroom, with an average price of $11 million. Amenities include a dedicated fitness center, screening room, kid’s playroom, conference rooms, access to a “comprehensive fitness experience” from Equinox and SoulCycle, and a “director of residences” who can do everything from coordinate laundry service to book a car if you need one.

11th Avenue & West 33rd Street
New York, NY 10001

5. 50 Hudson Yards

10th Avenue & West 33rd Street, New York, NY 10001
Tall buildings and trees. Courtesy of Related-Oxford

This McDonald’s-replacing tower is still several years away from completion, and will be one of the last projects to finish in Related and Oxford’s first phase of development. The Norman Foster-designed tower, located at the corner of West 34th Street and 10th Avenue, will rise 58 stories and have offices and retail. It will be the city’s fourth largest commercial tower when it’s complete.

10th Avenue & West 33rd Street
New York, NY 10001

6. 55 Hudson Yards

W 34th St & 11th Ave, New York, NY 10001

This 780-foot office tower is designed by KPF. Its facade—a combination of glass and matte metal—is meant to evoke the architecture of New York’s famed cast-iron building. Tenants began moving into the building in early 2019, and it will be home to firms like Arosa Capital Management; Boies, Schiller & Flexner; Cooley LLP; and Engineers Gate.

W 34th St & 11th Ave
New York, NY 10001

7. The Shops and Restaurants at Hudson Yards

10th Ave & W 31st St, New York, NY 10001
New York City’s New Hudson Yards Development Boasts Luxury Shopping Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

This seven-story retail behemoth will have 25 different restaurants by a host of celebrity chefs including Thomas Keller, David Chang, and José Andrés. Big-name retail in this high-end shopping center includes Neiman Marcus, Coach, and Stuart Weitzman. There will also be an interactive experience by the design firm Snarkitecture. The building was designed by KPF with interiors by Elkus Manfredi.

10th Ave & W 31st St
New York, NY 10001

8. Vessel

W 34th St & 11th Ave, New York, NY 10001

This Thomas Heatherwick-designed “public landmark”—temporarily called Vessel, but still awaiting its final name—is the centerpiece of the Related megaproject’s five-acre public park. The sculpture, which has 154 interconnecting flights of stairs with 2,500 steps and 80 landings, is free to the public, but can’t be accessed without a timed ticket. The park will have nearly 30,000 native plants, a new entrance to the High Line, a garden with seasonal blooms, and lots of outdoor seating.

W 34th St & 11th Ave
New York, NY 10001

9. The Shed

11th Ave & W 30th St, New York, NY 10001

The most unique feature of this multi-disciplinary arts center is an extendable outer shell—a temperature-, light-, and sound-controlled space that can host of a variety of performances. The six-story performance and exhibition space debuted on April 5 with several notable commissions; it’s currently hosting a retrospective featuring the work of conceptual artist Agnes Denes.

11th Ave & W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

10. The High Line Spur

555 W 30th St, New York, NY 10001

The High Line Spur—which runs above 30th Street and culminates in a large open space that hovers above Tenth Avenue—finally opened to the public this summer, seven years after the Friends of the High Line, the nonprofit that oversees the park, first revealed designs for it. The Spur also includes a section known as the High Line Plinth, which will feature large-scale art installations; the first one, Simone Leigh’s Brick House, will be on display for the next 18 months.

555 W 30th St
New York, NY 10001

11. One Manhattan West

401 9th Ave, New York, NY 10001
The triple-height, travertine-clad lobby of One Manhattan West is enclosed by glass walls. James M. Hooker / CTC Creative

The tallest of the structures within the eight-acre Manhattan West megaproject, One Manhattan West is officially open for business. The 995-foot-tall SOM-designed office tower will have 67 stories and 2.1 million square feet of office space. It’s 90 percent leased, with the NHL, the law firm Skadden, Arps, and more signing on for space in the building.

401 9th Ave
New York, NY 10001

12. Two Manhattan West

401 W 31st St, New York, NY 10001
The exterior of a tall building. The facade is glass. Brookfield

This office tower is part of Brookfield’s larger mini-megaproject, Manhattan West, and the developer officially filed plans for Two Manhattan West in November of 2017. The SOM-designed tower will stand 849-feet-tall and offer up nearly 1.75 million square feet of office space, and may be complete by 2022.

401 W 31st St
New York, NY 10001

13. Pendry Manhattan West

West 33rd Street, New York, NY
An aerial view of many tall city buildings. Courtesy of Brookfield

In the Manhattan West megaproject, a new hotel operated by the luxury Pendry brand will open in 2021. The hotel will have 164 rooms, and will be located in a building designed by SOM. Amenities for guests will include a restaurant, terrace, and conference rooms. Construction kicked off in 2018. 

West 33rd Street
New York, NY

14. Moynihan Train Hall

421 8th Ave, New York, NY 10001
An aerial view of a train station. Rendering via SOM

Work is now well underway on the conversion of the James A. Farley Post Office building into the Moynihan Train Hall. Construction kicked off in 2016, and made steady progress last year as the state prepped the site for what will eventually be a 255,000-square-foot train hall with nine platforms and 17 tracks. The train hall is part of the overall redevelopment of Penn Station into the Penn-Farley Complex. A new concourse that connects the post office building to the existing Penn Station opened in 2017.

421 8th Ave
New York, NY 10001

15. 3 Hudson Boulevard

11th Avenue & West 34th Street, New York, NY 10001
Tall city buildings along a waterfront in New York City.

Moinian Group’s supertall was supposed to be one of the first buildings to rise at Hudson Yards, but the developer broke ground on the project in November 2017. The developers were waiting for the MTA to finish infrastructure work on the 7 train extension before moving forward. The FXCollaborative-designed tower will rise 940 feet, and will offer nearly 1.85 million square feet of office space, and close to 15,000 square feet of retail.

11th Avenue & West 34th Street
New York, NY 10001

16. The Spiral

435 10th Avenue, New York, NY 10001
A group of buildings with glass facades. Courtesy of Tishman Speyer

Starchitect Bjarke Ingels’s Hudson Yards supertall was first announced in early 2016, and in April 2018, developer Tishman Speyer announced that construction would finally kick off. So far, the 65-story building has one big-name tenant; Pfizer will take up 800,000 square feet. The tower’s atypical design will have a glass facade punctuated by vertical gardens that wrap around the building, making it seem like the structure is twisting.

435 10th Avenue
New York, NY 10001

17. 99 Hudson Boulevard

99 Hudson Blvd, New York, NY 10001

Tishman Speyer also owns this development site, which has about 1.3 million square feet of buildable space. However, the firm has not moved forward with any plans for the site since announcing its assemblage in 2016.

99 Hudson Blvd
New York, NY 10001

18. 545 West 37th Street

545 West 37th Street, New York, NY 10018
A construction site is in the foreground. In the distance are tall city buildings.
This is what the site looked like in November 2017.
Via Google Maps

The Chetrit Group originally wanted to sell this prime Hudson Yards site, but changed its mind and filed plans for a 46-story building in September 2016. The low-rise buildings on the site have since been demolished. Plans filed with the DOB list CetraRuddy as the architect, and the 622-foot building will have a hotel with 421 rooms, and 131 condos above that. As of December 2018, Chetrit had received an $85 million loan for the project.

545 West 37th Street
New York, NY 10018

19. 431 West 33rd Street

Dyer Avenue, New York, NY
A tall residential building in New York City. Via SLCE.

Despite being announced in 2014, this project has yet to get moving. The land is owned by the Port Authority, and in 2014, a developer was willing to pay $115 million for this site and adjacent property. That deal fell through, and in 2016, the agency announced a nine-story building at the site with 24 apartments.

Dyer Avenue
New York, NY

20. Hyatt Place

350 West 39th Street, New York, NY 10018
A rendering of Hyatt Place. Via Gene Kaufman Architect

Hotelier Sam Chang paid $112 million for this site back in 2014, and now work is underway on a 25-story, 520-room Hyatt Place hotel, to be dsigned by Gene Kaufman. The hotel topped out in 2018, and Chang secured a refinancing deal for the property in 2019.

350 West 39th Street
New York, NY 10018

21. 451 10th Avenue

451 10th Avenue, New York, NY 10018