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The Lower East Side’s thousands of incoming apartments, mapped

From Essex Crossing to Two Bridges, 20+ developments creating a new Lower East Side landscape

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The next wave of Lower East Side gentrification is on. That’s no surprise to longtime neighborhood dwellers, who have watched as LES institutions like Streit’s Matzo Factory on Rivington Street, or a whole patch of low-rise restaurants along Houston, give way to new condos whose price per square foot broaches $2,000, and rentals that are equally unobtainable.

The area’s growing trend towards high-end residential units bucks decades of the neighborhood’s existence—as a landing place for immigrants around the turn of the 20th century, and as a place of respite for those who couldn’t afford surrounding neighborhoods like Soho and Nolita, whose prices have long since surpassed those of the Lower East Side.

So what does this new future hold for the Lower East Side? Check out some of the new residential developments in the works, and what they replaced, below.

Note: This article was originally published in July 2017 and has been updated with the most recent information.

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260 Bowery

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Developer Premier Equities razed a vacant three-story building in order to construct an eight-story one, designed by Morris Adjmi, that will have just six condos. Work on the building’s foundation began in July 2016, and according to City Realty, there will be retail space on the first two floors. Residences are expected average an asking price around $7.3 million.

Morris Adjmi

204 Forsyth Street

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The Lower East Side’s former Nativity Mission School has been replaced by this seven-story condo building. Sculptor Charles Saulson is developing the site and has brought on “It” interiors guru Paris Forino to design the 11 apartments. Majority of the building’s condos are now in contract, with just a few units remaining.

Town Residential

196 Orchard

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Developer Ben Shaoul is behind this development rising alongside the famous Katz’s Deli. The building received its gold-dusted brick facade back in March and sales launched September 2016. There are 94 apartments, with prices starting just over $1 million; the priciest unit that’s currently available is a $6.5 million three-bedroom.

Magnum Real Estate

265 East Houston

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After seven years in the works, the new condo building at 265 East Houston Street finally dropped a few of its apartments onto the market last May. The 10-story building has been a long time in the making: the Suffolk Street corner site was previously occupied by a two-story church whose demolition in 2010 destabilized the neighboring building, displacing a neighborhood daycare. The site was dormant for three years after the incident, with construction fencing and a first rendering of the condo-to-be appearing in 2014. There is currently just one unit on the market—a two-bedroom, two-bathroom that’s asking $2.15 million.

287/LES

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After selling to developers Hogg Holdings and Vinci Partners for $15.2 million in January 2015, three lots between Clinton and Suffolk Streets will give way to an 11-story condo building. In July, New York YIMBY reported that the building had topped out and facade installation, as well as interior construction, was underway. There will be 27 one- to three-bedroom apartments, priced from $1.1 million, and a full-floor triplex with a private penthouse will crown the building.

Rivington House

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The former Rivington House building is in the process of becoming luxury condos, after a controversial deed restriction was lifted in 2015, clearing the path for the conversion. Developers China Vanke Co., Adam America Real Estate, and Slate Property Group inked a $116 million deal with Allure Group—Allure purchased the building for $28 million in 2014—to acquire the site that was formerly mandated for use as a community care facility. The hubbub has lead to calls for reform in the city’s deed restriction lifting process, but has failed to halt the site’s conversion. Despite this, activists continue to protest the development and hope to see the building returned to its former use as a nursing home.

165 Chrystie Street

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A three-story building on Chrystie Street, between Rivington and Delancey Streets, has been razed for a 10-story condo designed by ODA New York. There will be just nine apartments, which developer Nexus says will each have polished concrete floors and 10-foot ceilings.

140 Essex Street

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The second of Essex Crossing’s fully affordable buildings for seniors will rise on the former site of the Lowline Lab (RIP!). The building will include 92 affordable senior apartments and ground floor retail space. Construction is expected to wrap up in 2020.

Courtesy of Beyer Blinder Belle

150 Rivington Street

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The former site of Streit’s Matzo Factory has given way to a seven-story building, developed by Cogswell Lee Development and Gluck+, with 45 condos. Back in July, facade installation was nearing completion and occupancy is slated for this fall. Prices for available units range from $1.135 million for a one-bedroom, one-bathroom unit and going up to $2.275 million for a three-bedroom that spans 1,600 square feet.

Cogswell Lee Development

86 Delancey Street

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A 12-story rental building is replacing the longtime former headquarters of Moscot Eyewear. A first rendering for the project, developed by Helm Equities, was revealed last July, illustrating the corner’s fate as home to 24 rentals. According to YIMBY, there will also be nearly 5,800 square feet of commercial space at the building’s base and SWA Architecture is behind the design.

Via SWA Architecture

138-142 Bowery

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A row of low-rise buildings along the Bowery have been demolished for a condo-hotel hybrid by Emmut Properties. The project will have 46 hotel rooms and 21 apartments spread out over eight floors. The developer bought the five-building parcel for $47 million back in 2015.

The Essex

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This 24-story rental tower is on the rise, and is set to become home to a new and improved Essex Market. The building will connect to the Market Line, a 150,000-square-foot below-ground mall. The building, dubbed 115 Delancey, will have 97 market rate and 98 affordable apartments, and a 14-screen Regal Cinema outpost.

We Are Visuals/Quallsbenson

282-286 Grand Street

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Three Federal-style row houses that are nearly 200 years old have been demolished to make way for a seven-story condo. The building will feature gallery space at its base, while the rest of the building will be home to 22 apartments, including two penthouses.

Rendering courtesy Peterson Rich Office

202 Broome Street

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One of the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area’s parking lots will sprout a condo with 83 market rate apartments as well as Class A office space and retail. The 15-story tower is being designed by CetraRuddy and will feature office space on floors two through five. The building’s completion is expected in 2021.

An aerial view of many tall city buildings in New York City. Moso Studios

180 Broome Street

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Construction has recently kicked off at 180 Broome Street, a 26-story mixed-use tower that’s part of the Essex Crossing development. The Handel Architects-designed building will have 263 rentals, of which 121 will be affordable, 10,000 square feet of retail on the ground floor, and 175,000 square feet of office space on floors two through five. The building’s cellar level will be home to a portion of the Market Line. Construction is expected to wrap up in 2020.

Handel Architects

355 Grand Street

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A new six-story apartment building is rising on the site of a Federal-style building that dates back to the 1820s. The building will have two apartments and retail space on the ground floor.

The building has since been demolished.
Google Maps

The Rollins

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Architect Beyer Blinder Belle is behind this 15-story Essex Crossing rental, dubbed the Rollins, where Target and Trader Joe’s have both set up shop. The building is shared between 107 market rate rentals and 104 affordable rentals—the lottery for the latter, the first at the megaproject, launched last March and netted more than 93,000 applicants.

Quallsbenson

226-232 East Broadway

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New York YIMBY has revealed renderings for a pair of buildings that could rise around the Bialystoker Nursing Home on East Broadway. The buildings would rise 20 and 36 stories tall and are designed by S4Architecture. Permits have not been filled for the site yet, but if approved, the project is hoping to wrap up in 2021 or 2022.

Rendering by S4 Architecture via New York YIMBY

201-203 East Broadway

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Two 180-year-old tenement buildings were dismantled in 2017 to make way for a seven-story modular building—a first for the Lower East Side. The new building will feature 10 pre-fab condos, with retail and medical space in the ground and basement levels.

193 Henry Street

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The former Mount Zion Church of Christ has been razed for a new six-story building with five apartments and cellar-level medical offices designed by Think! Architecture. The property was purchased in August 2015 by the same guy who’s developing modular condos at 201-203 East Broadway. The building topped out in May, just six days after going vertical, and move-ins were slated for this fall.

Methanoia

30 Pike Street

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In the wake of the Rivington House scandal, Mayor de Blasio announced a senior affordable housing and health care facility that will essentially replace the services lost at Rivington House. The new facility will be built through a Request For Proposals on a operated by the Department of Environmental Protection. The new facility will be able to accommodate 100 seniors.

259 Clinton Street

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At 259 Clinton Street, Starrett Development wants to build a 62-story, 724-foot-tall rental tower with 765 apartments, of which 191 will be permanently affordable. Perkins Eastman will design the building, which will also feature ground-floor retail, a community garden for residents, and a landscaped terrace,

Perkins Eastman

247 Cherry Street

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JDS Development Group is once again teaming up with SHoP Architects for this 900-foot rental building on the Two Bridges waterfront. (The two groups are also behind 111 West 57th Street and Brooklyn’s first supertall.) According to the plan, the building will rise 77 stories and hold 660 apartments, 165 which will be set aside as affordable housing. The building is just one of four towers proposed for a development area on the waterfront where towers of this size can be built without oversight from the city (to the chagrin of the public.)

260 South Street

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L+M Development Partners and CIM Group want to bring two 60-plus-story towers to the Two Bridges waterfront. The 798- and 728-foot skyscrapers are poised to rise on the parking lot of existing development Lands End II, a Section 8 housing development also owned by L+M. The development is anticipated to include 1,350 apartments, of which 338 will be permanently affordable. Like 247 Cherry Street, the development is in the midsts of a public review process.

Two Bridges waterfront skyscrapers Handel Architects

One Manhattan Square

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The first tower to sprout in Two Bridges is Extell’s One Manhattan Square, which launched sales a few years back. Residents will finally begin moving in next year; when they do, they’ll have access to the project’s extensive amenitis, including a tea garden and an adventure playground for kids.

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260 Bowery

Morris Adjmi

Developer Premier Equities razed a vacant three-story building in order to construct an eight-story one, designed by Morris Adjmi, that will have just six condos. Work on the building’s foundation began in July 2016, and according to City Realty, there will be retail space on the first two floors. Residences are expected average an asking price around $7.3 million.

Morris Adjmi

204 Forsyth Street

Town Residential

The Lower East Side’s former Nativity Mission School has been replaced by this seven-story condo building. Sculptor Charles Saulson is developing the site and has brought on “It” interiors guru Paris Forino to design the 11 apartments. Majority of the building’s condos are now in contract, with just a few units remaining.

Town Residential

196 Orchard

Magnum Real Estate

Developer Ben Shaoul is behind this development rising alongside the famous Katz’s Deli. The building received its gold-dusted brick facade back in March and sales launched September 2016. There are 94 apartments, with prices starting just over $1 million; the priciest unit that’s currently available is a $6.5 million three-bedroom.

Magnum Real Estate

265 East Houston

After seven years in the works, the new condo building at 265 East Houston Street finally dropped a few of its apartments onto the market last May. The 10-story building has been a long time in the making: the Suffolk Street corner site was previously occupied by a two-story church whose demolition in 2010 destabilized the neighboring building, displacing a neighborhood daycare. The site was dormant for three years after the incident, with construction fencing and a first rendering of the condo-to-be appearing in 2014. There is currently just one unit on the market—a two-bedroom, two-bathroom that’s asking $2.15 million.

287/LES

After selling to developers Hogg Holdings and Vinci Partners for $15.2 million in January 2015, three lots between Clinton and Suffolk Streets will give way to an 11-story condo building. In July, New York YIMBY reported that the building had topped out and facade installation, as well as interior construction, was underway. There will be 27 one- to three-bedroom apartments, priced from $1.1 million, and a full-floor triplex with a private penthouse will crown the building.

Rivington House

The former Rivington House building is in the process of becoming luxury condos, after a controversial deed restriction was lifted in 2015, clearing the path for the conversion. Developers China Vanke Co., Adam America Real Estate, and Slate Property Group inked a $116 million deal with Allure Group—Allure purchased the building for $28 million in 2014—to acquire the site that was formerly mandated for use as a community care facility. The hubbub has lead to calls for reform in the city’s deed restriction lifting process, but has failed to halt the site’s conversion. Despite this, activists continue to protest the development and hope to see the building returned to its former use as a nursing home.

165 Chrystie Street

A three-story building on Chrystie Street, between Rivington and Delancey Streets, has been razed for a 10-story condo designed by ODA New York. There will be just nine apartments, which developer Nexus says will each have polished concrete floors and 10-foot ceilings.

140 Essex Street

Courtesy of Beyer Blinder Belle

The second of Essex Crossing’s fully affordable buildings for seniors will rise on the former site of the Lowline Lab (RIP!). The building will include 92 affordable senior apartments and ground floor retail space. Construction is expected to wrap up in 2020.

Courtesy of Beyer Blinder Belle

150 Rivington Street

Cogswell Lee Development

The former site of Streit’s Matzo Factory has given way to a seven-story building, developed by Cogswell Lee Development and Gluck+, with 45 condos. Back in July, facade installation was nearing completion and occupancy is slated for this fall. Prices for available units range from $1.135 million for a one-bedroom, one-bathroom unit and going up to $2.275 million for a three-bedroom that spans 1,600 square feet.

Cogswell Lee Development

86 Delancey Street

Via SWA Architecture

A 12-story rental building is replacing the longtime former headquarters of Moscot Eyewear. A first rendering for the project, developed by Helm Equities, was revealed last July, illustrating the corner’s fate as home to 24 rentals. According to YIMBY, there will also be nearly 5,800 square feet of commercial space at the building’s base and SWA Architecture is behind the design.

Via SWA Architecture

138-142 Bowery

A row of low-rise buildings along the Bowery have been demolished for a condo-hotel hybrid by Emmut Properties. The project will have 46 hotel rooms and 21 apartments spread out over eight floors. The developer bought the five-building parcel for $47 million back in 2015.

The Essex

We Are Visuals/Quallsbenson

This 24-story rental tower is on the rise, and is set to become home to a new and improved Essex Market. The building will connect to the Market Line, a 150,000-square-foot below-ground mall. The building, dubbed 115 Delancey, will have 97 market rate and 98 affordable apartments, and a 14-screen Regal Cinema outpost.

We Are Visuals/Quallsbenson

282-286 Grand Street

Rendering courtesy Peterson Rich Office

Three Federal-style row houses that are nearly 200 years old have been demolished to make way for a seven-story condo. The building will feature gallery space at its base, while the rest of the building will be home to 22 apartments, including two penthouses.

Rendering courtesy Peterson Rich Office

202 Broome Street

An aerial view of many tall city buildings in New York City. Moso Studios

One of the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area’s parking lots will sprout a condo with 83 market rate apartments as well as Class A office space and retail. The 15-story tower is being designed by CetraRuddy and will feature office space on floors two through five. The building’s completion is expected in 2021.

An aerial view of many tall city buildings in New York City. Moso Studios

180 Broome Street

Handel Architects

Construction has recently kicked off at 180 Broome Street, a 26-story mixed-use tower that’s part of the Essex Crossing development. The Handel Architects-designed building will have 263 rentals, of which 121 will be affordable, 10,000 square feet of retail on the ground floor, and 175,000 square feet of office space on floors two through five. The building’s cellar level will be home to a portion of the Market Line. Construction is expected to wrap up in 2020.

Handel Architects

355 Grand Street

The building has since been demolished.
Google Maps

A new six-story apartment building is rising on the site of a Federal-style building that dates back to the 1820s. The building will have two apartments and retail space on the ground floor.

The building has since been demolished.
Google Maps

The Rollins