clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Mapping the cheapest apartments in Manhattan's priciest neighborhoods

Remarkably these listings aren't that bad to look at either

View as Map

If you don't already have over a million dollars stashed away, it seems like a totally futile quest to try to find an apartment in Manhattan, and it's probably even worse if you're trying to land yourself a pad in one of the borough's trendier (aka pricier) neighborhoods. There are some outliers however (shockingly they're not all that bad either), and PropertyShark seems to have narrowed them down. With the help of their redesigned home sales section, they narrowed down on the cheapest homes for sale in Manhattan's ten priciest neighborhoods. This is Manhattan after all, so the list, as you might expect, is predominantly full of studios. PropertyShark focussed on co-ops, and condos on sale, and provided a corresponding median sales price in the neighborhood for the second quarter this year to give a sense of how much these "cheapest" units stray from the pack. In Carnegie Hill for instance, the cheapest home, at $380,000 is six times less than the median sales price of $2.35 million. That's not the case for Noho however, where the cheapest unit at $1.75M is not that far from the median of $3.5M.

Read More

30 East 95th Street #3C—$380,000

Copy Link

Located in Carnegie Hill on the Upper East Side, this studio is asking $380,000. That's almost six times less than the neighborhood median sales price of $2.35 million. This co-op recently underwent a renovation, and comes with high ceilings, a walk-in closet, and hardwood floors. The apartment is located in a prewar elevator building which has a laundry room on-site.

139 East 33rd Street #9M—$410,000

Copy Link

Marketed as an extra-large studio, this Murray Hill co-op recently underwent a renovation to create more space in the apartment. Many of the closets were removed in the process to expand the living area, and the unit is now asking $410,000. In comparison, the median sales price in the neighborhood is $2.53 million. To get a sense of what this apartment might look, the broker has linked out to a similar sized studio he recently sold in the building.

50 East 8th Street #5V—$425,000

Copy Link

This Greenwich Village studio comes with hardwood floors, can fit a queen-sized bed in the living area, and is fitted with three closets. The co-op is asking is $425,000, in a neighborhood where the median sales price is $2.01 million. The building it's in comes with a laundry, a vegetable garden, and electric charges are including in the maintenance fees ($933/month).

110 Thompson Street #5D—$429,000

Copy Link

This Soho studio that's located on the fifth floor of a walkup building boasts features like high ceilings, exposed brick, and plenty of natural light. The co-op, which is asking $429,000, is in a building that was constructed in 1900, it comes with laundry and storage on-site, and as per the broker, the building allows for pied-à-terres, and has a liberal subletting policy. In comparison, the median sales price for an apartment in Soho is at $3.25 million.

16 West 16th Street Apt 1UN—$699,000

Copy Link

Being advertised as a spacious alcove studio/junior one-bedroom, this Flatiron District apartment wants $699,000. In comparison the median sales price in the neighborhood is at $2.07 million. This co-op comes with nine-foot tall ceilings, granite countertops in the kitchen, crown molding throughout, and french doors that lead to the sleeping alcove.

246 Spring Street—$775,000

Copy Link

Located in the Trump Soho condo, this studio is located on the 29th floor of the building and basically looks like a hotel room. The unit, which is asking $775,000, comes fully furnished with Fendi Casa furnishings, has a marble bathroom, and floor-to-ceiling windows. PropertyShark decided to pinpoint this as Hudson Square, and in comparison, the median sales price in the area is $2.25 million.

100 West 39th Street #40A—$899,000

Copy Link

Located at the Bryant Park Tower in Midtown, this 534-square-foot condo is being marketed as an alcove studio that can be converted into a one-bedroom. The unit, which wants $899,000, features a white marble breakfast bar, is just a block away from Bryant Park, and is big enough to accommodate a Queen-sized bed. The median sales price in this neighborhood is at $1.585 million.

57 Reade Street #4C—$900,000

Copy Link

For $900,000, this one-bedroom condo in Tribeca comes with high ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows, and a tiny 39-square-foot outdoor space. The 714-square foot apartment boasts views of both the East and Hudson Rivers, and the building it is located in offers amenities like a landscaped common terrace, and a fitness center. In comparison, the median sales price in the neighborhood is significantly higher at $4.24 million.

133 Mulberry Street #6C—$1.375M

Copy Link

Tiny Little Italy isn’t so small when it comes to sale prices: Per PropertyShark, the median price for an apartment in the neighborhood is about $2.74 million. So what can you get that’s not that expensive? A one-bedroom condo at 133 Mulberry Street, the neighborhood’s least expensive property for sale right now, is going for a still-pretty-pricey $1.375 million.

304 Bowery #5A—$1.75M

Copy Link

According to PropertyShark, the median sale price in NoHo is hovering around $3.74 million right now. And the cheapest property in the tiny neighborhood isn’t that much less expensive: a two-bedroom, 1,250-square-foot condo at 304 Bowery is asking $1.75 million.

Loading comments...

30 East 95th Street #3C—$380,000

Located in Carnegie Hill on the Upper East Side, this studio is asking $380,000. That's almost six times less than the neighborhood median sales price of $2.35 million. This co-op recently underwent a renovation, and comes with high ceilings, a walk-in closet, and hardwood floors. The apartment is located in a prewar elevator building which has a laundry room on-site.

139 East 33rd Street #9M—$410,000

Marketed as an extra-large studio, this Murray Hill co-op recently underwent a renovation to create more space in the apartment. Many of the closets were removed in the process to expand the living area, and the unit is now asking $410,000. In comparison, the median sales price in the neighborhood is $2.53 million. To get a sense of what this apartment might look, the broker has linked out to a similar sized studio he recently sold in the building.

50 East 8th Street #5V—$425,000

This Greenwich Village studio comes with hardwood floors, can fit a queen-sized bed in the living area, and is fitted with three closets. The co-op is asking is $425,000, in a neighborhood where the median sales price is $2.01 million. The building it's in comes with a laundry, a vegetable garden, and electric charges are including in the maintenance fees ($933/month).

110 Thompson Street #5D—$429,000

This Soho studio that's located on the fifth floor of a walkup building boasts features like high ceilings, exposed brick, and plenty of natural light. The co-op, which is asking $429,000, is in a building that was constructed in 1900, it comes with laundry and storage on-site, and as per the broker, the building allows for pied-à-terres, and has a liberal subletting policy. In comparison, the median sales price for an apartment in Soho is at $3.25 million.

16 West 16th Street Apt 1UN—$699,000

Being advertised as a spacious alcove studio/junior one-bedroom, this Flatiron District apartment wants $699,000. In comparison the median sales price in the neighborhood is at $2.07 million. This co-op comes with nine-foot tall ceilings, granite countertops in the kitchen, crown molding throughout, and french doors that lead to the sleeping alcove.

246 Spring Street—$775,000

Located in the Trump Soho condo, this studio is located on the 29th floor of the building and basically looks like a hotel room. The unit, which is asking $775,000, comes fully furnished with Fendi Casa furnishings, has a marble bathroom, and floor-to-ceiling windows. PropertyShark decided to pinpoint this as Hudson Square, and in comparison, the median sales price in the area is $2.25 million.

100 West 39th Street #40A—$899,000

Located at the Bryant Park Tower in Midtown, this 534-square-foot condo is being marketed as an alcove studio that can be converted into a one-bedroom. The unit, which wants $899,000, features a white marble breakfast bar, is just a block away from Bryant Park, and is big enough to accommodate a Queen-sized bed. The median sales price in this neighborhood is at $1.585 million.

57 Reade Street #4C—$900,000

For $900,000, this one-bedroom condo in Tribeca comes with high ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows, and a tiny 39-square-foot outdoor space. The 714-square foot apartment boasts views of both the East and Hudson Rivers, and the building it is located in offers amenities like a landscaped common terrace, and a fitness center. In comparison, the median sales price in the neighborhood is significantly higher at $4.24 million.

133 Mulberry Street #6C—$1.375M

Tiny Little Italy isn’t so small when it comes to sale prices: Per PropertyShark, the median price for an apartment in the neighborhood is about $2.74 million. So what can you get that’s not that expensive? A one-bedroom condo at 133 Mulberry Street, the neighborhood’s least expensive property for sale right now, is going for a still-pretty-pricey $1.375 million.

304 Bowery #5A—$1.75M

According to PropertyShark, the median sale price in NoHo is hovering around $3.74 million right now. And the cheapest property in the tiny neighborhood isn’t that much less expensive: a two-bedroom, 1,250-square-foot condo at 304 Bowery is asking $1.75 million.