clock menu more-arrow no yes

Mapping New York City's First 38 Landmarks

View as Map

In April of 1965, Mayor Robert F. Wagner signed into law legislation that would give way to the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, an entity that has diligently served to protect the city's historically significant structures—or, depending on how it's looked at, thwart new development—since its formation. In the 50 years since its founding, the LPC has ruled on thousands of buildings and historic districts; in its first year alone it designated 38 structures and the Brooklyn Heights Historic District (PDF!). Now, take a look back at the landmarking decisions the commission made immediately following one of the city's great losses: the demolition of Penn Station.


· A Commission That Has Itself Become a Landmark [NYT]
· All LPC coverage [Curbed]

Read More

1. La Grange Terrace

Copy Link
434 Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10003

The colonnade row of La Grange Terrace was built in 1833 by architects Alexander Jackson Davis and Seth Geer. The nine row houses (of which four still exist) were commissioned by John Jacob Astor. They buildings are also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [Photo via Jim.Hendersen]

2. 51 Market Street

Copy Link
51 Market Street
New York, NY 10002

The William and Rosamund Clark House may not appear special, but the 1825-built home is an early example of Federal style in the Lower East Side, and was built when the neighborhood was an affluent residential area. The house was reportedly commissioned by grocer William Clark. [Photo via AmericasRoof]

3. Astor Library

Copy Link
425 Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10003

Astor Library, also known as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society Building and nowadays as Joe's Pub, was built from 1849 through 1881 by Alexander Saeltzer, Griffin Thomas, and Thomas Stent in the Rundbogenstil and Victorian styles. The building was initially intended to function as a research library with a non-circulating catalogue, but ended up consolidating with existing organizations to form the New York Public Library. [Photo via NYC-Architecture].

4. Boat House on the Lullwater of the Lake

Copy Link

This Prospect Park boat house was built by McKim, Mead & White protégés Helmle & Huberty in 1904 in the Italian-Renaissance style. The boat house was nearly torn-down for lack of use in 1964, but was maintained and now serves as an interpretive center for the Audubon Society. The boat house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [Photo via Wikipedia courtesy of Ben Frankse]

5. Sailors' Snug Harbor Dormitories A-E

Copy Link
1000 Richmond Ter
Staten Island, NY 10301

Arguably the centerpiece of the Staten Island maritime complex originally built for aging sailors, the Sailors' Snug Harbor dormitories on Richmond Terrace were constructed from 1833 to 1880 by Minard Lafever and Richard P. Smyth in the Greek Revival style. The Sailors' Snug Harbor campus is a National Historic Landmark as well as on the National Register of Historic Places. [Photo via Dmadeo]

6. Sailors' Snug Harbor Chapel

Copy Link

The veteran memorial chapel on the maritime campus was built in 1854 in the Italianate style by James Solomon. The renovated chapel now serves as a recital and concert space. [Photo via Jim.henerson]

7. Castle Clinton National Monument

Copy Link
Battery Park
New York, NY 10004

Battery Park's Castle Clinton, whose endearing tag line from the National Park Service is "Built to keep people out; now welcomes millions in," was built in 1812 to thwart a British invasion. McKim, Mead & White worked on the project as well as John McComb and Jonathon Williams. [Photo via NPS]

8. Commandant's House

Copy Link
24 Evans Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Quarters A of this still-mysterious, gated Federal-style mansion on the Vinegar Hill waterfront was built as a home for the Naval Yard Commandant by Capitol architect Charles Bulfinch. The three-time landmarked home has been in private ownership since the Navy Yard closed in 1964. [Photo via ScoutingNY]

9. Haughwout Building

Copy Link
492 Broadway
New York, NY 10012

This gorgeous cast-iron building was constructed by J.P. Gaynor in 1856 to serve as Eder V. Haughwout's Fashionable Emporium, which sold imported cut glass, silverware, hand-painted china, and chandeliers to the likes of Mary Todd Lincoln. The building was home to the world's first successful passenger elevator. Haughwout's is also on the National Register of Historic Places. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

10. Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Copy Link
33 Liberty St
New York, NY 10045
(212) 720-6130

This full-block neo-Renaissance building was constructed from 1919-1924 and serves as the home of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The building was designed by McKim, Mead & White protégés York and Sawyer. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

11. Federal Hall National Memorial

Copy Link
26 Wall St
New York, NY 10005
(212) 668-6990
Visit Website

Referred to by the National Park Service as the "Birthplace of American Government", the Greek-Doric-style Federal Hall was constructed in 1842 and was in essence where George Washington was sworn in (a different iteration; Washington was inaugurated in 1789), and also served as home to the first Congress, Supreme Court, and Executive Branch offices. [Photo via NPS]

12. National City Bank Building

Copy Link
55 Wall St
New York, NY 10005

The First National City Bank Building was designed by Isaiah Rogers in 1842 in the Greek Revival style for use as the Merchant's Exchange. The Citibank predecessor moved in in 1907 and enlisted a McKim, Mead & White enlargement. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

13. Fraunces Tavern

Copy Link
54 Pearl St
New York, NY 10004
(212) 968-1776
Visit Website

Although it's now a museum, Fraunces Tavern was constructed in 1719 for use as a bar, and ended up becoming the first offices for Foreign Affairs, War and Treasury following the Revolutionary War. The building has also operated as a boarding house, historic gathering place, and a restaurant. [Photo via Fraunces Tavern Museum]

14. Friends Meeting House

Copy Link
144 East 20th Street
New York, NY 10003

Now used as the Brotherhood Synagogue, the two-story building at 144 East 20th Street on Gramercy Park was constructed in 1859 as the Friends Meeting House. It's built in the Anglo-Italianate style and is made almost entirely of Dorchester olive stone. It became a landmark on October 26, 1965. [Photo via PropertyShark]

15. India House

Copy Link
1 Hanover Sq
New York, NY 10004
(212) 269-2323
Visit Website

Last year, the India House celebrated its 100th birthday in its home at 1 Hanover Street, but the landmarked building existed for decades before the private club moved in. Built by Richard F. Carman in 1853, the Anglo-Italianate style brownstone building was the headquarters of the Hanover Bank, and in 1870, the New York Cotton Exchange was born here. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

16. J.P. Morgan Building

Copy Link

The neoclassical Morgan Building at 23 Wall Street, designed by Trowbridge & Livingston, is described in its designation report as "a fine marble building" that has a "great impression of solid dignity and massive strength." So it will be a real shame if this grand landmark actually becomes the tacky entertainment complex that was recently proposed. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

17. The Morgan Library & Museum

Copy Link
231 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016
(212) 685-0008
Visit Website

Built as the home for J.P. Morgan and his family, the mansion at 231 Madison Avenue became a public institution in 1924, in accordance with Morgan's will. Today it's known as the Morgan Library & Museum. The building is unique because it's exposed on three sides, displaying many of its architectural details, including a stone balustrade with Doric balusters, a porch with Corinthian columns, and wrought iron balconies. It became a landmark on November 23, 1965. [Photo via Property Shark]

18. James Watson House

Copy Link
7 State Street
New York, NY 10004

The James Watson House, now the rectory of the Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton, is a more unusual building, as it curves to follow the shape of State Street. It dates to 1793, and it is the last reminder of the Federal-style townhouses that once lined the street. In its November 1965 designation report, the LPC said its state of preservation was "a near miracle," as the owner "spared no pains or expense to maintain the building." [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

19. John Street United Methodist Church

Copy Link
44 John St
New York, NY 10038
(212) 269-0014

The John Street Church was built in the Georgian style in 1841, with attribution for its design given to Philip Enbury. The church was also listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

20. Kingsland Homestead

Copy Link
143-35 37th Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354

The second oldest vernacular frame house in Flushing was built from 1774-1785. The home's design exhibits Dutch and English aesthetics brought to the city by European colonizers. The estate gets its name from Captain Charles King, whose family lived on in the house until 1937. [Photo via Mathiou J-A]

21. The Manhattan Club

Copy Link
32 East 26th Street
New York, NY 10010
(212) 581-5436
Visit Website

Commissioned by Leonard Jerome in 1859, 32 East 26th Street was intended to be the "largest and most opulent" home of its time. After Jerome and family moved out, the building played home to several high-society clubs, including the Manhattan Club. Despite its landmarked status, the building was bulldozed in 1967, and now in its place stands the 42-story Merchandise Mart skyscraper. [Photo via Daytonian in Manhattan]

22. New Brighton Village Hall

Copy Link
66 Lafayette Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10301

Another landmark that fell to the wrecking ball is the New Brighton Village Hall that was built between 1868 and 1871 in the Second Empire style. The James Whitford-designed building was torn down in 2004 because of neglect. [Photo via Forgotten NY]

23. Merchant's House Museum

Copy Link
29 E 4th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 777-1089
Visit Website

This 19th-century house became a very lovely museum in 1936, and claims to be the only home in the city preserved as-is from that era, both inside and out. Also called the Seabury Tredwell House, it was built on spec by a milliner, who then sold it to Seabury Tredwell, an affluent merchant who lived there with his eight children and an array of servants. Their original possessions remain inside to this day. A recent preservation battle brewed when developers tried to build a tall-ish hotel next to the architecturally fragile structure. [Photo via Wikipedia]

24. New York County Lawyer's Association

Copy Link
14 Vesey St
New York, NY 10007

Architect Cass GIlbert built the New York County Lawyers Association Building in 1930, borrowing from the Federal and Georgian styles. The organization takes residence in the building to this day. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

25. Old Bronx Borough Hall

Copy Link
East Tremont Avenue & 3rd Avenue
Bronx, NY 10457

The old Bronx Borough Hall was located on top of a rocky plateau at the southeast intersection of Tremont and Third avenues. The pictuaresque three-story building was designed in the Renaissance style. It was consumed by a massive fire in 1968, after which it was deemed structurally unsafe and torn down. [Image via Our Old Neighborhood]

26. Old New York Evening Post Building

Copy Link
20 Vesey Street
New York, NY 10007

A rare example of the Art Nouveau architectural style in New York City, this pretty building is the former home of the New York Evening Post that also housed its printing plant. It dates back to 1906, back when the area around City Hall Park was still dotted with publishing enterprises. The building's mansard roof has four sculptures, all related to the trade. Yes, it's a landmark, and such a valued one that the Landmarks Preservation Commission itself had offices here between 1980 and 1987. [Photo via Flickr/epicharmus]

27. Stuyvesant-Fish House

Copy Link
21 Stuyvesant Street
New York, NY 10003

The quaint 1804-built Federal-style home was the birthplace and childhood dwelling of New York State Senator and Governor Hamilton Fish. The building is now owned by Cooper Union and used as lodging for the university's president. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

28. Alexander Hamilton US Custom House

Copy Link
1 Bowling Grn
New York, NY 10004

The federal government commissioned Cass Gilbert to design this Beaux Arts-style building in 1907 for use as offices for duty collection operations for the port of New York. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

29. Old United States Naval Hospital

Copy Link
Squibb Park Bridge
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Architectural historian Christopher Gray called the Brooklyn Navy Yard a "muscular collection of industrial architecture," describing one of the city's earliest landmarks as such: "the magnificent, slightly sagging Naval Hospital, a ghostly marble temple built in 1838 and empty for two decades." It's been bait for abandoned-building lovers for just about that long, and has been named an endangered building by the Landmarks Conservancy. The rest of the massive navy yard complex is undergoing major repurposing and renovation, so will the hospital come next? [Photo via Atlas Obscura]

30. St. Peter's Church (R.C.)

Copy Link
22 Barclay St.
New York, NY 10007
(212) 233-8355
Visit Website

A pristine example of early Greek Revival architecture in Lower Manhattan, congregants have flocked to this site for prayer even before the house of worship that we know today was completed in 1834. It's the oldest Roman Catholic parish in the U.S.; during 9/11 it morphed into a staging area for emergency responders. [Photo via Daytonian in Manhattan]

31. Wyckoff House

Copy Link
5816 Clarendon Road
Brooklyn, NY 11203

As per historian James Nevius, who chronicled the 20 oldest buildings in NYC for Curbed, "In 1652, the Flatlands section of Brooklyn was centered around the Dutch village of New Amersfoort. That year, Pieter Claesen Wyckoff—a former indentured servant from Rensselaerswyck near Albany—and his wife Grietje, moved to Brooklyn and likely built this one-room farmhouse where they raised their 11 children. After many years of additions, that original room is the kitchen of the house-museum, and it gives remarkable insight into the lives of Dutch farmers on what was then frontier." [Photo via James Nevius]

Loading comments...

1. La Grange Terrace

434 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10003

The colonnade row of La Grange Terrace was built in 1833 by architects Alexander Jackson Davis and Seth Geer. The nine row houses (of which four still exist) were commissioned by John Jacob Astor. They buildings are also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [Photo via Jim.Hendersen]

434 Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10003

2. 51 Market Street

51 Market Street, New York, NY 10002

The William and Rosamund Clark House may not appear special, but the 1825-built home is an early example of Federal style in the Lower East Side, and was built when the neighborhood was an affluent residential area. The house was reportedly commissioned by grocer William Clark. [Photo via AmericasRoof]

51 Market Street
New York, NY 10002

3. Astor Library

425 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10003

Astor Library, also known as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society Building and nowadays as Joe's Pub, was built from 1849 through 1881 by Alexander Saeltzer, Griffin Thomas, and Thomas Stent in the Rundbogenstil and Victorian styles. The building was initially intended to function as a research library with a non-circulating catalogue, but ended up consolidating with existing organizations to form the New York Public Library. [Photo via NYC-Architecture].

425 Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10003

4. Boat House on the Lullwater of the Lake

Brooklyn, NY 11225

This Prospect Park boat house was built by McKim, Mead & White protégés Helmle & Huberty in 1904 in the Italian-Renaissance style. The boat house was nearly torn-down for lack of use in 1964, but was maintained and now serves as an interpretive center for the Audubon Society. The boat house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [Photo via Wikipedia courtesy of Ben Frankse]

5. Sailors' Snug Harbor Dormitories A-E

1000 Richmond Ter, Staten Island, NY 10301

Arguably the centerpiece of the Staten Island maritime complex originally built for aging sailors, the Sailors' Snug Harbor dormitories on Richmond Terrace were constructed from 1833 to 1880 by Minard Lafever and Richard P. Smyth in the Greek Revival style. The Sailors' Snug Harbor campus is a National Historic Landmark as well as on the National Register of Historic Places. [Photo via Dmadeo]

1000 Richmond Ter
Staten Island, NY 10301

6. Sailors' Snug Harbor Chapel

Staten Island, NY

The veteran memorial chapel on the maritime campus was built in 1854 in the Italianate style by James Solomon. The renovated chapel now serves as a recital and concert space. [Photo via Jim.henerson]

7. Castle Clinton National Monument

Battery Park, New York, NY 10004

Battery Park's Castle Clinton, whose endearing tag line from the National Park Service is "Built to keep people out; now welcomes millions in," was built in 1812 to thwart a British invasion. McKim, Mead & White worked on the project as well as John McComb and Jonathon Williams. [Photo via NPS]

Battery Park
New York, NY 10004

8. Commandant's House

24 Evans Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Quarters A of this still-mysterious, gated Federal-style mansion on the Vinegar Hill waterfront was built as a home for the Naval Yard Commandant by Capitol architect Charles Bulfinch. The three-time landmarked home has been in private ownership since the Navy Yard closed in 1964. [Photo via ScoutingNY]

24 Evans Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

9. Haughwout Building

492 Broadway, New York, NY 10012

This gorgeous cast-iron building was constructed by J.P. Gaynor in 1856 to serve as Eder V. Haughwout's Fashionable Emporium, which sold imported cut glass, silverware, hand-painted china, and chandeliers to the likes of Mary Todd Lincoln. The building was home to the world's first successful passenger elevator. Haughwout's is also on the National Register of Historic Places. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

492 Broadway
New York, NY 10012

10. Federal Reserve Bank of New York

33 Liberty St, New York, NY 10045

This full-block neo-Renaissance building was constructed from 1919-1924 and serves as the home of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The building was designed by McKim, Mead & White protégés York and Sawyer. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

33 Liberty St
New York, NY 10045

11. Federal Hall National Memorial

26 Wall St, New York, NY 10005

Referred to by the National Park Service as the "Birthplace of American Government", the Greek-Doric-style Federal Hall was constructed in 1842 and was in essence where George Washington was sworn in (a different iteration; Washington was inaugurated in 1789), and also served as home to the first Congress, Supreme Court, and Executive Branch offices. [Photo via NPS]

26 Wall St
New York, NY 10005

12. National City Bank Building

55 Wall St, New York, NY 10005

The First National City Bank Building was designed by Isaiah Rogers in 1842 in the Greek Revival style for use as the Merchant's Exchange. The Citibank predecessor moved in in 1907 and enlisted a McKim, Mead & White enlargement. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

55 Wall St
New York, NY 10005

13. Fraunces Tavern

54 Pearl St, New York, NY 10004

Although it's now a museum, Fraunces Tavern was constructed in 1719 for use as a bar, and ended up becoming the first offices for Foreign Affairs, War and Treasury following the Revolutionary War. The building has also operated as a boarding house, historic gathering place, and a restaurant. [Photo via Fraunces Tavern Museum]

54 Pearl St
New York, NY 10004

14. Friends Meeting House

144 East 20th Street, New York, NY 10003

Now used as the Brotherhood Synagogue, the two-story building at 144 East 20th Street on Gramercy Park was constructed in 1859 as the Friends Meeting House. It's built in the Anglo-Italianate style and is made almost entirely of Dorchester olive stone. It became a landmark on October 26, 1965. [Photo via PropertyShark]

144 East 20th Street
New York, NY 10003

15. India House

1 Hanover Sq, New York, NY 10004

Last year, the India House celebrated its 100th birthday in its home at 1 Hanover Street, but the landmarked building existed for decades before the private club moved in. Built by Richard F. Carman in 1853, the Anglo-Italianate style brownstone building was the headquarters of the Hanover Bank, and in 1870, the New York Cotton Exchange was born here. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

1 Hanover Sq
New York, NY 10004

16. J.P. Morgan Building

Wall Street 23 Lower Manhattan New York, New York

The neoclassical Morgan Building at 23 Wall Street, designed by Trowbridge & Livingston, is described in its designation report as "a fine marble building" that has a "great impression of solid dignity and massive strength." So it will be a real shame if this grand landmark actually becomes the tacky entertainment complex that was recently proposed. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

17. The Morgan Library & Museum

231 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016

Built as the home for J.P. Morgan and his family, the mansion at 231 Madison Avenue became a public institution in 1924, in accordance with Morgan's will. Today it's known as the Morgan Library & Museum. The building is unique because it's exposed on three sides, displaying many of its architectural details, including a stone balustrade with Doric balusters, a porch with Corinthian columns, and wrought iron balconies. It became a landmark on November 23, 1965. [Photo via Property Shark]

231 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10016

18. James Watson House

7 State Street, New York, NY 10004

The James Watson House, now the rectory of the Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton, is a more unusual building, as it curves to follow the shape of State Street. It dates to 1793, and it is the last reminder of the Federal-style townhouses that once lined the street. In its November 1965 designation report, the LPC said its state of preservation was "a near miracle," as the owner "spared no pains or expense to maintain the building." [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

7 State Street
New York, NY 10004

19. John Street United Methodist Church

44 John St, New York, NY 10038

The John Street Church was built in the Georgian style in 1841, with attribution for its design given to Philip Enbury. The church was also listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [Photo via Beyond My Ken]

44 John St
New York, NY 10038

20. Kingsland Homestead

143-35 37th Avenue, Flushing, NY 11354

The second oldest vernacular frame house in Flushing was built from 1774-1785. The home's design exhibits Dutch and English aesthetics brought to the city by European colonizers. The estate gets its name from Captain Charles King, whose family lived on in the house until 1937. [Photo via Mathiou J-A]

143-35 37th Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354

21. The Manhattan Club

32 East 26th Street, New York, NY 10010

Commissioned by Leonard Jerome in 1859, 32 East 26th Street was intended to be the "largest and most opulent" home of its time. After Jerome and family moved out, the building played home to several high-society clubs, including the Manhattan Club. Despite its landmarked status, the building was bulldozed in 1967, and now in its place stands the 42-story Merchandise Mart skyscraper. [Photo via Daytonian in Manhattan]

32 East 26th Street
New York, NY 10010

22. New Brighton Village Hall

66 Lafayette Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10301

Another landmark that fell to the wrecking ball is the New Brighton Village Hall that was built between 1868 and 1871 in the Second Empire style. The James Whitford-designed building was torn down in 2004 because of neglect. [Photo via Forgotten NY]

66 Lafayette Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10301

23. Merchant's House Museum

29 E 4th St, New York, NY 10003

This 19th-century house became a very lovely museum in 1936, and claims to be the only home in the city preserved as-is from that era, both inside and out. Also called the Seabury Tredwell House, it was built on spec by a milliner, who then sold it to Seabury Tredwell, an affluent merchant who lived there with his eight children and an array of servants. Their original possessions remain inside to this day. A recent preservation battle brewed when developers tried to build a tall-ish hotel next to the architecturally fragile structure. [Photo via Wikipedia]

29 E 4th St
New York, NY 10003

24. New York County Lawyer's Association

14 Vesey St, New York, NY 10007

Architect Cass GIlbert built the New York County Lawyers Association Building in 1930, borrowing from the Federal and Georgian styles. The organization takes residence in the building to this day. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

14 Vesey St
New York, NY 10007

25. Old Bronx Borough Hall

East Tremont Avenue & 3rd Avenue, Bronx, NY 10457

The old Bronx Borough Hall was located on top of a rocky plateau at the southeast intersection of Tremont and Third avenues. The pictuaresque three-story building was designed in the Renaissance style. It was consumed by a massive fire in 1968, after which it was deemed structurally unsafe and torn down. [Image via Our Old Neighborhood]

East Tremont Avenue & 3rd Avenue
Bronx, NY 10457

26. Old New York Evening Post Building

20 Vesey Street, New York, NY 10007

A rare example of the Art Nouveau architectural style in New York City, this pretty building is the former home of the New York Evening Post that also housed its printing plant. It dates back to 1906, back when the area around City Hall Park was still dotted with publishing enterprises. The building's mansard roof has four sculptures, all related to the trade. Yes, it's a landmark, and such a valued one that the Landmarks Preservation Commission itself had offices here between 1980 and 1987. [Photo via Flickr/epicharmus]

20 Vesey Street
New York, NY 10007

27. Stuyvesant-Fish House

21 Stuyvesant Street, New York, NY 10003

The quaint 1804-built Federal-style home was the birthplace and childhood dwelling of New York State Senator and Governor Hamilton Fish. The building is now owned by Cooper Union and used as lodging for the university's president. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

21 Stuyvesant Street
New York, NY 10003

28. Alexander Hamilton US Custom House

1 Bowling Grn, New York, NY 10004

The federal government commissioned Cass Gilbert to design this Beaux Arts-style building in 1907 for use as offices for duty collection operations for the port of New York. [Photo via Wikimedia Commons]

1 Bowling Grn
New York, NY 10004

29. Old United States Naval Hospital

Squibb Park Bridge, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Architectural historian Christopher Gray called the Brooklyn Navy Yard a "muscular collection of industrial architecture," describing one of the city's earliest landmarks as such: "the magnificent, slightly sagging Naval Hospital, a ghostly marble temple built in 1838 and empty for two decades." It's been bait for abandoned-building lovers for just about that long, and has been named an endangered building by the Landmarks Conservancy. The rest of the massive navy yard complex is undergoing major repurposing and renovation, so will the hospital come next? [Photo via Atlas Obscura]

Squibb Park Bridge
Brooklyn, NY 11201

30. St. Peter's Church (R.C.)

22 Barclay St., New York, NY 10007

A pristine example of early Greek Revival architecture in Lower Manhattan, congregants have flocked to this site for prayer even before the house of worship that we know today was completed in 1834. It's the oldest Roman Catholic parish in the U.S.; during 9/11 it morphed into a staging area for emergency responders. [Photo via Daytonian in Manhattan]

22 Barclay St.
New York, NY 10007

31. Wyckoff House

5816 Clarendon Road, Brooklyn, NY 11203

As per historian James Nevius, who chronicled the 20 oldest buildings in NYC for Curbed, "In 1652, the Flatlands section of Brooklyn was centered around the Dutch village of New Amersfoort. That year, Pieter Claesen Wyckoff—a former indentured servant from Rensselaerswyck near Albany—and his wife Grietje, moved to Brooklyn and likely built this one-room farmhouse where they raised their 11 children. After many years of additions, that original room is the kitchen of the house-museum, and it gives remarkable insight into the lives of Dutch farmers on what was then frontier." [Photo via James Nevius]

5816 Clarendon Road
Brooklyn, NY 11203