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New York City's 20 tiniest parks, mapped

If you can barely stand in it, does it even count as a park?

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Just like some people don't think a 90-square-foot studio is a real apartment, a lot of people probably won't consider a 1/1000-acre sliver of land a park. But the Parks Department oversees dozens of outdoor sites that are about the size of a micro unit. In our week-long search to shout out all things tiny, the Parks Department graciously sent a list of the 20 smallest properties under their control.

All of these places are triangles sandwiched between streets, more than half are in Queens, and most serve as memorials, so they pack a surprising amount of history. They do not, however, provide a very relaxing environment to connect with nature, but you can find 29 of those kind of parks right here.

A spokesperson for the Parks Department says that many of these sites "were created through the reconfiguration of roadways" and they are named through local law or the by the Parks Commissioner.

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1. Luke J. Lang Square

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Behold, the smallest parkland in all of New York City. Measuring a minuscule 1/1000 of an acre, Lang Square is barely more than a few hedges, but in the 1930s, it held a flagpole, several benches, and three Norway maples, which makes one think that it used to be a much larger space. In 2000, the city spent $13,353 to give it new sidewalks.

2. Joyce Kilmer Triangle

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This patch also measures 1/1000th of an acre, but it certainly looks much larger than Lang Triangle. It's named after Joyce Kilmer, a poet and writer who worked for the New York Times. It's entirely unclear why this location was chosen, but it has been parkland since 1934, and named Kilmer Triangle since 1935.

3. Middleburgh Triangle

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Corona Avenue & 90th Street
Queens, NY 11373

From 1652 to 1664, the area of Maspeth, where this desolate-looking wedge sits, was known as Middleburgh, named such for a city in the Netherlands. The Parks Department has controlled the space since 1918, even though it's never been more than a traffic triangle with a bus stop.

4. Dwyer Square

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John J. Dwyer was a Queens native who died in World War I, and this triangle first took his name in 1932. The park measures .002 acres and holds a flagpole, benches, three Japanese pagoda trees, a honey locust tree, and a green ash tree.

5. Dunningham Triangle

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82 St
Jackson Heights, NY 11372

DNAinfo has managed to write five stories about this .003-acre piece of land, named for Jabez E. Dunningham, who lived in Elmhurst from the 1920s until his death in 1945. The park has been upgraded several times, most recently receiving $200,000 in 2012 for new seating and landscaping.

6. Freedom Triangle

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Myrtle Ave. & Willoughby Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11221

The highlight of Freedom Triangle, a .004-acre slice of land in Bushwick, is a scuplture called Victory With Peace, depicting Nike, the Greek Goddess of Victory, leaning forward with an olive branch. It was erected in 1921 to honor the Brooklynites who died in World War I.

7. Corporal Frank F. Fagan Square

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48th Street & Newtown Road
Astoria, NY 11103

Named for WWI veteran Corporal Frank F. Fagan, Fagan Square sits at a busy Astoria intersection near the N/R train and William Cullen Bryant High School. The .004-acre site has been parkland since 1915, and today, it's part of the Greenstreets program

8. Fidelity Triangle

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Here's another patch of greenery to honor New Yorkers who died in WWI combat. The site is just 1/200 of an acre and holds three London planetrees, and as well as seven World's Fair benches (aka the traditional park bench, which was introduced at the 1939 World's Fair).

9. Jacob Riis Triangle

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85th Avenue & Babbage Street
Richmond Hill, NY 11418

Given how famous and influential Jacob Riis was, he could have a triangle named for him anywhere in the city, but the Parks Department chose this site in the 1990s because Riis lived in the neighborhood, Richmond Hill. Parks acquired the site in 1945, and it was originally known as Babbage Triangle, until a council member lobbied for the change. It measures 1/200 of an acre.

10. Alben Triangle

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46th Street & 11th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11219

A flagpole and modest memorial sit in the center of Alben Triangle, named for Bud H. Alben, who was killed during WWI. The memorial was created by the VFW post named for Alben, and it became city property in 1935. It measures 1/200 of an acre.

11. Glendale Veterans Memorial Triangle

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Myrtle Avenue
Glendale, NY 11385

The residents of Glendale paid for this memorial to honor their 21 neighbors who died fighting in WWI. It features a bronze bas relief of a female holding a torch set in granite, along with the inscribed names of the veterans. The triangle, sandwiched between Myrtle and Cooper avenues, clocks in at 1/200 of an acre.

12. Catholic War Veterans Triangle

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Rockaway Boulevard & 116th Avenue
South Ozone Park, NY 11420

Why yes, this is another war memorial triangle. The Parks Department has little information about this .006-acre Queens property on its website, but the brick-paved open space features a stone cross sculpture surrounded by trees and a few benches.

13. Dahill Triangle

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Dahill Road & 24th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11204

The Parks Department also has no historic information about Dahill Triangle, which sits on Dahill Road in south Brooklyn. The .006-acre space holds a path of hedge-lined grass and one tree.

14. Garlinge Triangle

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Grand Avenue & 57th Avenue
Maspeth, NY 11378

Measuring a roomy 1/125 of an acre, Garlinge Triangle commemorates the Maspeth, Queens residents who died in combat during WWI. It features a monument at center, as well as a flagpole and some benches.

15. Wellbrock Triangle

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109th Avenue & 106th Street
Ozone Park, NY 11417

Another community-funded memorial sits in the 1/125-acre Wellbrock Triangle in Ozone Park. This obelisk also honors those who died in World War I.

16. American Triangle

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102nd Street & 41st Avenue
Corona, NY 11368

Coming in at .009 acres, American Triangle, named such for unknown reasons, holds several benches and trees. The surrounding streets are lined in shops, and the park seems to get a steady stream of foot traffic.

17. Barnhill Square

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West Kingsbridge Road & Reservoir Avenue
Bronx, NY 10468

The only Bronx site on this list, Barnhill Square sits across the street from Kingsbridge Armory. The Parks Department has no information online about its origins, but the park's benches may soon see a lot more action if the Armory's redevelopment manages to push through.

18. Albert E. Short Triangle Park

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Jackson Ave.
Queens, NY 11101

Albert E. Short lived his entire life in Long Island City, and served as the Queens Assistant District Attorney from 1938 to 1951. The triangle named for him measures 1/100 of an acre and sits beside the Court Square subway station, the construction of which seems to have eliminated a Norway maple. The Parks website says that in 1997 "a baby Weeping cherry tree was planted in the center of the triangle to accompany the long-standing Norway maple tree that stands at the triangle’s western corner," but Google Street View makes it clear that all of the triangle's trees are young.

19. McKenna Triangle

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One Court Sq.
Long Island City, NY

Named for Long Island City native Major James A. McKenna, who died in WWI, this 1/100-acre park became city property in 1911. It was named for McKenna in 1919, and today features trees, benches, and bike parking.

20. Clemens Triangle

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In Ridgewood, Clemens Triangle honors Carl E. Clemens, the former owner of The Ridgewood Times. The 1/100-acre park is simple, holding just a few benches shaded by large trees, but it's in a busy commercial district, so its seats are well-used.

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1. Luke J. Lang Square

Queens, NY

Behold, the smallest parkland in all of New York City. Measuring a minuscule 1/1000 of an acre, Lang Square is barely more than a few hedges, but in the 1930s, it held a flagpole, several benches, and three Norway maples, which makes one think that it used to be a much larger space. In 2000, the city spent $13,353 to give it new sidewalks.

2. Joyce Kilmer Triangle

New York

This patch also measures 1/1000th of an acre, but it certainly looks much larger than Lang Triangle. It's named after Joyce Kilmer, a poet and writer who worked for the New York Times. It's entirely unclear why this location was chosen, but it has been parkland since 1934, and named Kilmer Triangle since 1935.

3. Middleburgh Triangle

Corona Avenue & 90th Street, Queens, NY 11373

From 1652 to 1664, the area of Maspeth, where this desolate-looking wedge sits, was known as Middleburgh, named such for a city in the Netherlands. The Parks Department has controlled the space since 1918, even though it's never been more than a traffic triangle with a bus stop.

Corona Avenue & 90th Street
Queens, NY 11373

4. Dwyer Square

New York

John J. Dwyer was a Queens native who died in World War I, and this triangle first took his name in 1932. The park measures .002 acres and holds a flagpole, benches, three Japanese pagoda trees, a honey locust tree, and a green ash tree.

5. Dunningham Triangle

82 St, Jackson Heights, NY 11372

DNAinfo has managed to write five stories about this .003-acre piece of land, named for Jabez E. Dunningham, who lived in Elmhurst from the 1920s until his death in 1945. The park has been upgraded several times, most recently receiving $200,000 in 2012 for new seating and landscaping.

82 St
Jackson Heights, NY 11372

6. Freedom Triangle

Myrtle Ave. & Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11221

The highlight of Freedom Triangle, a .004-acre slice of land in Bushwick, is a scuplture called Victory With Peace, depicting Nike, the Greek Goddess of Victory, leaning forward with an olive branch. It was erected in 1921 to honor the Brooklynites who died in World War I.

Myrtle Ave. & Willoughby Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11221

7. Corporal Frank F. Fagan Square

48th Street & Newtown Road, Astoria, NY 11103

Named for WWI veteran Corporal Frank F. Fagan, Fagan Square sits at a busy Astoria intersection near the N/R train and William Cullen Bryant High School. The .004-acre site has been parkland since 1915, and today, it's part of the Greenstreets program

48th Street & Newtown Road
Astoria, NY 11103

8. Fidelity Triangle

Brooklyn, NY 11222

Here's another patch of greenery to honor New Yorkers who died in WWI combat. The site is just 1/200 of an acre and holds three London planetrees, and as well as seven World's Fair benches (aka the traditional park bench, which was introduced at the 1939 World's Fair).

9. Jacob Riis Triangle

85th Avenue & Babbage Street, Richmond Hill, NY 11418

Given how famous and influential Jacob Riis was, he could have a triangle named for him anywhere in the city, but the Parks Department chose this site in the 1990s because Riis lived in the neighborhood, Richmond Hill. Parks acquired the site in 1945, and it was originally known as Babbage Triangle, until a council member lobbied for the change. It measures 1/200 of an acre.

85th Avenue & Babbage Street
Richmond Hill, NY 11418

10. Alben Triangle

46th Street & 11th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219

A flagpole and modest memorial sit in the center of Alben Triangle, named for Bud H. Alben, who was killed during WWI. The memorial was created by the VFW post named for Alben, and it became city property in 1935. It measures 1/200 of an acre.

46th Street & 11th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11219

11. Glendale Veterans Memorial Triangle

Myrtle Avenue, Glendale, NY 11385

The residents of Glendale paid for this memorial to honor their 21 neighbors who died fighting in WWI. It features a bronze bas relief of a female holding a torch set in granite, along with the inscribed names of the veterans. The triangle, sandwiched between Myrtle and Cooper avenues, clocks in at 1/200 of an acre.

Myrtle Avenue
Glendale, NY 11385

12. Catholic War Veterans Triangle

Rockaway Boulevard & 116th Avenue, South Ozone Park, NY 11420

Why yes, this is another war memorial triangle. The Parks Department has little information about this .006-acre Queens property on its website, but the brick-paved open space features a stone cross sculpture surrounded by trees and a few benches.

Rockaway Boulevard & 116th Avenue
South Ozone Park, NY 11420

13. Dahill Triangle

Dahill Road & 24th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11204

The Parks Department also has no historic information about Dahill Triangle, which sits on Dahill Road in south Brooklyn. The .006-acre space holds a path of hedge-lined grass and one tree.

Dahill Road & 24th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11204

14. Garlinge Triangle

Grand Avenue & 57th Avenue, Maspeth, NY 11378

Measuring a roomy 1/125 of an acre, Garlinge Triangle commemorates the Maspeth, Queens residents who died in combat during WWI. It features a monument at center, as well as a flagpole and some benches.

Grand Avenue & 57th Avenue
Maspeth, NY 11378

15. Wellbrock Triangle

109th Avenue & 106th Street, Ozone Park, NY 11417

Another community-funded memorial sits in the 1/125-acre Wellbrock Triangle in Ozone Park. This obelisk also honors those who died in World War I.

109th Avenue & 106th Street
Ozone Park, NY 11417

16. American Triangle

102nd Street & 41st Avenue, Corona, NY 11368

Coming in at .009 acres, American Triangle, named such for unknown reasons, holds several benches and trees. The surrounding streets are lined in shops, and the park seems to get a steady stream of foot traffic.

102nd Street & 41st Avenue
Corona, NY 11368

17. Barnhill Square

West Kingsbridge Road & Reservoir Avenue, Bronx, NY 10468

The only Bronx site on this list, Barnhill Square sits across the street from Kingsbridge Armory. The Parks Department has no information online about its origins, but the park's benches may soon see a lot more action if the Armory's redevelopment manages to push through.

West Kingsbridge Road & Reservoir Avenue
Bronx, NY 10468

18. Albert E. Short Triangle Park

Jackson Ave., Queens, NY 11101

Albert E. Short lived his entire life in Long Island City, and served as the Queens Assistant District Attorney from 1938 to 1951. The triangle named for him measures 1/100 of an acre and sits beside the Court Square subway station, the construction of which seems to have eliminated a Norway maple. The Parks website says that in 1997 "a baby Weeping cherry tree was planted in the center of the triangle to accompany the long-standing Norway maple tree that stands at the triangle’s western corner," but Google Street View makes it clear that all of the triangle's trees are young.

Jackson Ave.
Queens, NY 11101

19. McKenna Triangle

One Court Sq., Long Island City, NY

Named for Long Island City native Major James A. McKenna, who died in WWI, this 1/100-acre park became city property in 1911. It was named for McKenna in 1919, and today features trees, benches, and bike parking.

One Court Sq.
Long Island City, NY

20. Clemens Triangle

Queens, NY

In Ridgewood, Clemens Triangle honors Carl E. Clemens, the former owner of The Ridgewood Times. The 1/100-acre park is simple, holding just a few benches shaded by large trees, but it's in a busy commercial district, so its seats are well-used.