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NYC’s supertall skyscraper boom, mapped

These 20+ skyscrapers will forever alter the New York City skyline

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When it comes to new developments in New York City, the supertall tower is still king: Many of the city’s most high-profile developments, from One World Trade Center to Central Park Tower, all exceed the 984-foot limit that takes a building from merely tall to supertall. (Architects here have yet to design a building that would rocket into the megatall category, or above 1,968 feet.)

These soaring towers aren’t always popular—many have actively fought against the buildings sprouting along 57th Street and Central Park South, worried that they’ll cause shadowing over the storied park—but it’s hard to argue against their status as marvels of engineering.

But how many of these buildings does New York City have? We counted, and the number as of right now is 28; that includes buildings that are either completed, under construction, or in the proposal or development (or just plain rumor) phases. They’re all mapped below—and if you know of something new, hit the tipline.

This map was last updated March 6, 2020.

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One World Trade Center: 1,776 feet

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Status: Completed

Upon completion in 2014, this Lower Manhattan tower took the title of New York City’s tallest building. With its spire, the structure reaches a symbolic height of 1,776 feet; without, it’s a mere 1,368 feet.

Tower Fifth: 1,556 feet

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Status: Proposed

Developer Harry Macklowe, the brains behind the skyline-altering tower at 432 Park Avenue, is planning another cloud-piercer on Fifth Avenue. It’ll rise more than 1,550 feet, and Macklowe will need to amass air rights, including some from neighboring St. Patrick’s Cathedral, for the tower to reach its full height. The building will have a spate of bonkers amenities for both tenants and the public—including “the city’s tallest observatory, where visitors would be able to dive down a transparent, 60-foot corkscrew slide,” per the New York Times.

The entryway of a building. The ceilings are high and the walls and floor are white. There is an escalator. The far wall has floor to ceiling windows. Renderings by TMRW/Gensler for Macklowe Properties

Central Park Tower: 1,550 feet

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Status: Under construction

One WTC will still technically be taller than Extell’s Central Park Tower (formerly known as the Nordstrom Tower), but if you’re looking at parapet height alone, this 57th Street building will come out on top: After losing its own spire, it now stands at 1,550 feet tall. Sales for the skyline-piercing building’s condos launched in 2018, and as anticipated they’re very expensive; reportedly, more than a dozen of its apartments will ask more than $20 million. It topped out in September 2019.

350 Park Avenue: 1,450 feet

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Status: Proposed

Vornado Realty Trust and Rudin Management have reportedly partnered to transform the 30-story building at 350 Park Avenue (currently managed by the former) into a 1,450-foot supertall that would loom over Midtown. In order to build, the developers would likely have to demolish two buildings: Vornado’s block-long 350 Park Avenue, which was designed by Emery Roth & Sons, and Rudin’s 40 East 52nd Street, currently the HQ for BlackRock (which will move to Hudson Yards in the next few years).

A tall skyscraper with geometric structures on the side. It is surrounded by city buildings. Vornado/Rudin

80 South Street: 1,436 feet

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Status: Proposed

There has been speculation about a supertall tower planned for 80 South Street, and in 2016, the site sold to China Oceanwide Holdings. The sale was contingent upon the original owner, the Howard Hughes Corporation, transferring over 300,000 square feet of air rights after initially getting over 100,000 square feet of air rights for the site. The development potential for the site now stands at 817,784 square feet, and a proposed building could rise to 1,436 feet. As of 2019, Oceanwide was searching for a buyer for the site, with a sale price of around $300 million.

The corner of a city block. There is a large apartment building with a red brick facade.

111 W 57th Street: 1,428 feet

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Status: Under construction

SHoP’s 57th Street tower may not be New York City’s tallest, but it will be the skinniest, which is its own sort of engineering marvel. The residential structure will reach a height of 1,428 feet once it’s completed. Construction on the building, which cantilevers over the old Steinway Hall, is well underway, and its condos hit the market last fall. It topped out in October 2019.

One Vanderbilt: 1,401 feet

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Status: Under construction

SL Green’s 1,401-foot-tall tower is currently under construction, and will tower over much of Midtown East upon completion. It’ll bring new subway entrances, public plazas, and an observation deck soaring 1,020 feet in the air with it upon completion in 2020. It started going vertical in 2017, and has topped out as of September 2019.

Tall skyscrapers and city buildings. Courtesy of SL Green

15 Penn Plaza: 1,400 feet

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Status: Proposed

Nothing is set in stone just yet for Vornado’s transformation of the Hotel Pennsylvania into a new office tower, and in fact, executives at the firm recently said the project is on hold for the time being. But it was previously rumored that the old hotel would be demolished and give way to a 1,400-foot building that might have the unfortunate moniker “Penn15.”

432 Park Avenue: 1,396 feet

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Status: Completed

New York City’s current tallest residential building topped out at its full 1,396-foot height in October 2014. The Rafael Viñoly-designed structure has been controversial from the start, thanks to its height and distinctive facade, which was inspired by a trash can (no, really). Closings on its high-end condos began in 2016—the priciest thus far is a three-unit combo that sold for a whopping $91 million—with residents moving in not long after.

270 Park Avenue: 1,322 feet

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Status: Under construction

This spring, the city approved JPMorgan Chase’s plans to demolish 270 Park Avenue—aka the Union Carbide Building—and replace it with a supertall skyscraper. According to plans on file with the Department of Buildings, the new building, to be designed by Foster + Partners, will be a supertall rising 1,322 feet. It’ll come with a 10,000-square-foot, privately owned public space, along with $42 million in investment towards pedestrian and transit upgrades. The old building, designed by SOM’s Gordon Bunshaft and Natalie de Blois, is currently being demolished.

Tall buildings. Photo by Michael Brown/Getty Images

30 Hudson Yards: 1,296 feet

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Status: Under construction

Hudson Yards’s tallest building, designed by Kohn Pederson Fox, has officially topped out. It will also be home to the city’s tallest—and most mind-bogglingly terrifying—observation deck, known as Edge, located on the building’s 75th floor and jutting out more than 1,000 feet above the city. (Its views are incredible.) That opens on March 11, but tickets are already available.

2 World Trade Center: 1,270 feet

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Status: Proposed

It’s take three for 2 World Trade Center: Developer Larry Silverstein has scrapped Bjarke Ingels Group’s 2015 design for the unbuilt skyscraper, and will instead go back to working with Foster + Partners to produce a new design for the building. A spokesperson for Silverstein confirmed that Foster will redesign the tower, but didn’t have any further details on when a new design may be revealed.

Tall skyscrapers. All of the skyscrapers have many windows. DBOX

Empire State Building: 1,250 feet

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Status: Completed

When this iconic building was completed in 1931, it snagged the title of the tallest building in the world—at least until the Twin Towers topped out in the 1970s. At 1,250 feet high, the Art Deco structure may be dwarfed by newer construction, but it remains more beloved than the towers along Billionaire’s Row.

Bank of America Tower: 1,200 feet

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Status: Completed

Also known as One Bryant Park, this 1,200-foot tower overlooks Bryant Park and Times Square. It has the distinction of being the first building to achieve Platinum LEED certification.

A skyscraper and several city buildings against a purple and blue sky in the evening. Chris Goldberg/Curbed Flickr Pool

3 World Trade Center: 1,079 feet

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Status: Completed

After long delays, work finally resumed on this Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners structure in 2015, and it topped out at 1,079 feet in 2016. The 80-story office tower officially debuted last summer, and tenants like GroupM (which has a 20-year lease for 700,000 square feet), Tiffany’s, and London-based steakhouse Hawksmoor will move in soon. In all, the building offers 2.5 million square feet of space.

9 Dekalb Avenue: 1,066 feet

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Status: Under construction

Brooklyn’s first supertall tower, another collaboration between SHoP Architects and JDS Development, will rise adjacent to the Dime Savings Bank building. The 1,066-foot skyscraper, which will have 500 apartments, is somewhat reminiscent of the design for the duo’s other gigantic building, 111 West 57th Street. Construction got underway in 2017, after the Landmarks Preservation Commission gave it the seal of approval in 2016.

53W53: 1,050 feet

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Status: Completed

Jean Nouvel’s MoMA-adjacent tower hit the market in 2015, with luxury condos that take full advantage of its 1,050-foot-tall height. The lucky one-percenters who end up living there will also have access to some sweet MoMA perks, including a special “benefactor” membership and access to “small, private curatorial talks.” Fancy. The building topped out at 82 stories last year.

Chrysler Building: 1,046 feet

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Status: Completed

The 1,046-foot-tall Chrysler Building may not have been the world’s tallest building for long (11 months, to be precise, before the Empire State Building came along), but it can rest easy in the knowledge that it’s still perhaps New York City’s loveliest skyscraper.

New York Times Building: 1,046 feet

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Status: Completed

Unlike the original Times building, this 1,046-foot-tall structure sticks out on the New York City skyline. The Renzo Piano-designed building initially had ladder-like rods on its facade, but those were removed after three separate daredevils scaled the tower in 2008.

45 Broad Street: 1,035 feet

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Status: Under construction/on hold

The Financial District’s tallest residential tower is officially on hold: Developers Madison Equities and Gemdale Properties have stopped work on this tower, citing “market conditions” in lower Manhattan. But once it’s back on solid footing, the condo tower will still be a supertall, standing more than 1,000 feet tall.

Two city buildings in the foreground. Between the buildings in the distance is a tall and thin skyscraper. There are cars in the foreground. By Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

The Spiral: 1,031 feet

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Status: Under construction

Bjarke Ingels’s 1,031-foot behemoth will stand 65 stories tall when it’s completed in 2022. Its design is perhaps most notable for the vertical gardens that wrap all around the exterior of the building. The 2.2 million-square-feet office building will be developed at an estimated cost of $3.2 billion. An anchor tenant has yet to sign on, but Pfizer has inked a deal for a lease.

Courtesy of Tishman Speyer

262 Fifth Avenue: 1,011 feet

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Status: Proposed

The Department of Buildings has given the green light to this 1,011-foot skyscraper, designed by Russian firm Meganom. Two buildings at the corner of 29th Street and Fifth Avenue have already been torn down in preparation for the skyscraper’s rise, and an adjacent limestone structure will be incorporated into the supertall’s base. The building will be home to just 41 apartments, per the DOB filings, and its design is intended to maximize what will surely be the very large footprints of those units. 

Tall skyscrapers and city buildings against a blue sky. Five Points Development & Mir

35 Hudson Yards: 1,009 feet

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Status: Completed

The tallest residential tower at the Hudson Yards megaproject was designed by David Childs of SOM. The building topped out at 1,009 feet in June 2018, and its ultra-luxe apartments—which start at $5 million—hit the market on the same day that Hudson Yards opened to the public. It’s also home to an Equinox hotel and the fancy fitness chain’s largest club, both of which opened this summer.

247 Cherry Street: 1,008 feet

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Status: Proposed

JDS and SHoP will partner on another supertall, this one within the contested Two Bridges waterfront parcel in lower Manhattan. But in two recent court rulings, state Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron struck down the City Planning Commission’s December 2018 approvals for the soaring building, part of a larger development plan for the area that includes skyscrapers from CIM Group, L+M Development Partners, and Starrett Development. if the developers want to push forward with their existing plans they’d have to show that the residential towers would not “unduly increase the bulk of buildings, density of population, or intensity of use in any block.”

In the foreground is a body of water. In the distance are multiple tall skyscrapers and smaller city buildings. SHoP Architects

One57: 1,005 feet

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Status: Completed 

This mixed-use tower is home to both ultra-luxurious condos and rentals, as well as the Park Hyatt New York hotel. It reached its full, 1,005-foot height in 2012, and was briefly the city’s tallest residential building.

Skyscrapers and city buildings at sunset. Shutterstock

One Manhattan West: 995 feet

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Status: Completed

Brookfield’s mini-megaproject, located just a few blocks southeast of Hudson Yards, will include an office tower that will just reach supertall status, standing at 995 feet tall. The 67-story office tower, designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, officially opened in October 2019.

A building with a glass facade. People walk alongside the building on a path. Courtesy of Brookfield

250 Water Street: 990 feet

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Status: Proposed

As part of an integrated plan to redevelop several sites in the South Street Seaport, the Howard Hughes Corporation aims to build an up to 990-foot tower on a contested lot that could bring hundreds of new apartments to the neighborhood’s historic district. The mixed-use building would rise on the edge of the historically low-slung patch of Lower Manhattan under a scenario that would transfer more than 700,000 unused development rights, many from three high-profile properties, to alter the zoning at 250 Water Street. But the project is not yet set in stone; it would need to go through the city’s ULURP process before moving forward.

SOM/The Howard Hughes Corporation

50 Hudson Yards: 985 feet

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Status: Under construction

The sale of a Midtown McDonald’s to Related cleared the way for this skyscraper, which will be designed by Norman Foster’s Foster + Partners. It will just attain supertall status, with a height of 985 feet; when completed in 2022, it’ll be one of the largest commercial buildings in the city.

Several buildings with glass facades. Courtesy of Related-Oxford

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One World Trade Center: 1,776 feet

Status: Completed

Upon completion in 2014, this Lower Manhattan tower took the title of New York City’s tallest building. With its spire, the structure reaches a symbolic height of 1,776 feet; without, it’s a mere 1,368 feet.

Tower Fifth: 1,556 feet

The entryway of a building. The ceilings are high and the walls and floor are white. There is an escalator. The far wall has floor to ceiling windows. Renderings by TMRW/Gensler for Macklowe Properties

Status: Proposed

Developer Harry Macklowe, the brains behind the skyline-altering tower at 432 Park Avenue, is planning another cloud-piercer on Fifth Avenue. It’ll rise more than 1,550 feet, and Macklowe will need to amass air rights, including some from neighboring St. Patrick’s Cathedral, for the tower to reach its full height. The building will have a spate of bonkers amenities for both tenants and the public—including “the city’s tallest observatory, where visitors would be able to dive down a transparent, 60-foot corkscrew slide,” per the New York Times.

The entryway of a building. The ceilings are high and the walls and floor are white. There is an escalator. The far wall has floor to ceiling windows. Renderings by TMRW/Gensler for Macklowe Properties

Central Park Tower: 1,550 feet

Status: Under construction

One WTC will still technically be taller than Extell’s Central Park Tower (formerly known as the Nordstrom Tower), but if you’re looking at parapet height alone, this 57th Street building will come out on top: After losing its own spire, it now stands at 1,550 feet tall. Sales for the skyline-piercing building’s condos launched in 2018, and as anticipated they’re very expensive; reportedly, more than a dozen of its apartments will ask more than $20 million. It topped out in September 2019.

350 Park Avenue: 1,450 feet

A tall skyscraper with geometric structures on the side. It is surrounded by city buildings. Vornado/Rudin

Status: Proposed

Vornado Realty Trust and Rudin Management have reportedly partnered to transform the 30-story building at 350 Park Avenue (currently managed by the former) into a 1,450-foot supertall that would loom over Midtown. In order to build, the developers would likely have to demolish two buildings: Vornado’s block-long 350 Park Avenue, which was designed by Emery Roth & Sons, and Rudin’s 40 East 52nd Street, currently the HQ for BlackRock (which will move to Hudson Yards in the next few years).

A tall skyscraper with geometric structures on the side. It is surrounded by city buildings. Vornado/Rudin

80 South Street: 1,436 feet

The corner of a city block. There is a large apartment building with a red brick facade.

Status: Proposed

There has been speculation about a supertall tower planned for 80 South Street, and in 2016, the site sold to China Oceanwide Holdings. The sale was contingent upon the original owner, the Howard Hughes Corporation, transferring over 300,000 square feet of air rights after initially getting over 100,000 square feet of air rights for the site. The development potential for the site now stands at 817,784 square feet, and a proposed building could rise to 1,436 feet. As of 2019, Oceanwide was searching for a buyer for the site, with a sale price of around $300 million.

The corner of a city block. There is a large apartment building with a red brick facade.

111 W 57th Street: 1,428 feet

Status: Under construction

SHoP’s 57th Street tower may not be New York City’s tallest, but it will be the skinniest, which is its own sort of engineering marvel. The residential structure will reach a height of 1,428 feet once it’s completed. Construction on the building, which cantilevers over the old Steinway Hall, is well underway, and its condos hit the market last fall. It topped out in October 2019.

One Vanderbilt: 1,401 feet

Tall skyscrapers and city buildings. Courtesy of SL Green

Status: Under construction

SL Green’s 1,401-foot-tall tower is currently under construction, and will tower over much of Midtown East upon completion. It’ll bring new subway entrances, public plazas, and an observation deck soaring 1,020 feet in the air with it upon completion in 2020. It started going vertical in 2017, and has topped out as of September 2019.

Tall skyscrapers and city buildings. Courtesy of SL Green

15 Penn Plaza: 1,400 feet

Status: Proposed

Nothing is set in stone just yet for Vornado’s transformation of the Hotel Pennsylvania into a new office tower, and in fact, executives at the firm recently said the project is on hold for the time being. But it was previously rumored that the old hotel would be demolished and give way to a 1,400-foot building that might have the unfortunate moniker “Penn15.”

432 Park Avenue: 1,396 feet

Status: Completed

New York City’s current tallest residential building topped out at its full 1,396-foot height in October 2014. The Rafael Viñoly-designed structure has been controversial from the start, thanks to its height and distinctive facade, which was inspired by a trash can (no, really). Closings on its high-end condos began in 2016—the priciest thus far is a three-unit combo that sold for a whopping $91 million—with residents moving in not long after.