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Staten Island real estate: 14 projects that will transform the borough

From tourist attractions to huge residential projects, these developments will shape the borough’s future

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As prices continue to skyrocket in Brooklyn and Queens, developers have set their eyes on Staten Island. In the coming years, the borough’s North Shore will undergo a massive transformation, with the arrival of one of the world’s tallest observation wheels; the city’s first outlet mall, Empire Outlets; and hundreds of new apartments.

But the North Shore isn’t the only part of the borough undergoing major changes: In the center of the island, what was once the world’s largest landfill is slowly becoming the 2,200-acre Freshkills Park. The largely neglected New York City Farm Colony and Sea View Hospital campuses are being turned into new developments targeted towards seniors. And a massive planned rezoning effort could bring 2,500 new apartments to the borough in the next decade or more.

To track these changes (and more!), here’s a map is of all the major developments transforming Staten Island. But first, a caveat: this is by no means the final word on development—new projects are announced constantly—so if there are any others you think should be on this list, let us know in the comments.

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New York Wheel

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When complete, the New York Wheel will be one of the tallest observation wheels in the world—and when it debuts in 2018, this 630-foot behemoth will be able to seat 1,440 people at a time. It’s currently rising right next to the Staten Island Ferry Terminal. Having settled a lawsuit with onetime minority stakeholders on the $600 million project, construction got underway in earnest last year. The Wheel’s creation will be accompanied by a 10,000-square-foot playground, an outdoor beer garden, and a five-acre green roof that will host concerts and events.

new york wheel OHNY Perkins Eastman, S9 Architecture

Empire Outlets

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Located right next to the New York Wheel, Empire Outlets will bring 100 stores, a 190-room hotel, and restaurants to Staten Island’s North Shore. Touted as being NYC’s only outlet mall, The BFC Partners-developed project will also include a 12,000-square-foot food court with 3,000 square feet of outdoor space. The project is expected to wrap sometime in 2018.

Lighthouse Point

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Being built on the same scale as the nearby URBY Staten Island, Lighthouse Point will bring an office building, a 116-unit apartment building, and a Westin hotel to what was once the location of the U.S. Lighthouse Service Depot in St. George. Construction officially got underway early last year, and the project is expected to wrap sometime in 2019.

Via Triangle Equities

108-110 Port Richmond Avenue

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Plans here call for the existing two-story structures to make way for a 77-unit supportive housing project spread out over eight stories. Saint Joseph’s Medical Structure wants to build a project that will house 50 apartments for those recovering from mental illness, and 27 affordable apartments. The units will come in studios through two-bedrooms. Port Richmond residents have been vehemently opposed to the project to due the excess of social services in their neighborhood.

Via St Joseph’s Medical Center

Minthorne Street

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A massive warehouse on Tompkinsville’s Minthorne Street is set to be converted into a barbecue joint. That conversion will also create room for more shops to open in this building, which is currently home to the Flagship Brewery. In addition, the developer is also planning to spruce up the Victory Boulevard and Bay Street side of this property and transform this area into “Staten Island’s newest hot spot.”

Via Silive

Staten Island Urby

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One of the most high-profile projects to debut on Staten Island in recent years, Staten Island Urby is a mini-neighborhood unto itself (within the larger Stapleton community, that is). The enormous rental comes with amenities like a 5,000-foot-urban farm, a restaurant, a coffee shop, and a swimming pool—and that’s just the first phase. The second phase will bring an additional 330 apartments to Staten Island’s North Shore.

Photo by Max Touhey

125 Edgewater Street

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On the eastern shore of Staten Island, development firm V Capital Management has planned a residential project that could feature nearly 400 apartments. The waterfront plot is currently zoned for manufacturing, and the developer is debating between a 371-unit project or a 396-unit one. In either case, the apartments will be spread out among three buildings over 18 acres of land. Twenty percent of the apartments here will be affordable, and there are also plans for a 60,000-square-foot waterfront esplanade.

Via Caliendo Architects

80 Scarboro Avenue

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Earlier this year, plans were filed for a 72-unit building in Rosebank. The building will only stand three stories tall, and apartments here will measure 980 square feet on average. Plans also call for a 69-car garage and a 16-car parking lot.

Via Google Maps

Mount Manresa Jesuit Retreat Redevelopment

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When the Savo Brothers decided to redevelop the Mount Manresa Jesuit Retreat into a 250-unit townhouse project, despite community protests, Staten Island Borough President James Oddo decided to saddle the project with street names that are synonyms for “deceit” and “greed.” The developers were undeterred and filed plans for the project in August last year.

New York City Farm Colony

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Located across from the Seaview Hospital development, this equally ambitious project will restore many buildings within the former New York City Farm Colony, and create 344 condos marketed towards New Yorkers over 55 years of age. In addition, developer Raymond Masucci also intends to build 17 acres of landscaped outdoor space within this massive campus.

Photo by Nathan Kensinger

Seaview Hospital

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In August 2016, the city announced that it was taking this neglected hospital campus and transforming it into a mixed-use, health-focused development. A Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEI) was released last December, and the city is looking for a developer to create a campus with housing, farm-to-table restaurants, community farms, and landscaped areas that promote physical activity.

Via NYCEDC

Freshkills Park

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Once the world’s largest landfill, this massive Staten Island site is now in the midst of being transformed into a 2,200-acre park. While Freshkill Park’s development will take place in multiple phases until the late 2030s, several sections have already opened, including a playground, a ball field, and an extensive bicycle track. When complete, the park will feature five distinct sections and be almost three times the size of Central Park.

1 Nassau Place

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This vast, empty stretch of land could soon be home to a massive residential complex. Bridgewater Capital Partners paid $30 million to acquire this piece of land in southern Staten Island and wants to bring an assisted living facility for seniors, retail, and apartments to the site. The land is currently zoned for industrial, retail, and office use, and has the potential to build up to 3.5 million square feet.

Via Google Maps

Conference House Park

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This reconstruction project on the island’s southern tip has been in the works for years now. Construction on the park pavilion is finally expected to get underway sometime this year, and when completed, it will provide 4,200 square feet of space for concerts, events, and weddings. The site has a storied past having served as a Lenape Indian burial ground for thousands of years before Europeans arrived; later, it hosted the unsuccessful Staten Island Peace Conference held there on September 11, 1776.

via Sage and Coombe

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New York Wheel

new york wheel OHNY Perkins Eastman, S9 Architecture

When complete, the New York Wheel will be one of the tallest observation wheels in the world—and when it debuts in 2018, this 630-foot behemoth will be able to seat 1,440 people at a time. It’s currently rising right next to the Staten Island Ferry Terminal. Having settled a lawsuit with onetime minority stakeholders on the $600 million project, construction got underway in earnest last year. The Wheel’s creation will be accompanied by a 10,000-square-foot playground, an outdoor beer garden, and a five-acre green roof that will host concerts and events.

new york wheel OHNY Perkins Eastman, S9 Architecture

Empire Outlets

Located right next to the New York Wheel, Empire Outlets will bring 100 stores, a 190-room hotel, and restaurants to Staten Island’s North Shore. Touted as being NYC’s only outlet mall, The BFC Partners-developed project will also include a 12,000-square-foot food court with 3,000 square feet of outdoor space. The project is expected to wrap sometime in 2018.

Lighthouse Point

Via Triangle Equities

Being built on the same scale as the nearby URBY Staten Island, Lighthouse Point will bring an office building, a 116-unit apartment building, and a Westin hotel to what was once the location of the U.S. Lighthouse Service Depot in St. George. Construction officially got underway early last year, and the project is expected to wrap sometime in 2019.

Via Triangle Equities

108-110 Port Richmond Avenue

Via St Joseph’s Medical Center

Plans here call for the existing two-story structures to make way for a 77-unit supportive housing project spread out over eight stories. Saint Joseph’s Medical Structure wants to build a project that will house 50 apartments for those recovering from mental illness, and 27 affordable apartments. The units will come in studios through two-bedrooms. Port Richmond residents have been vehemently opposed to the project to due the excess of social services in their neighborhood.

Via St Joseph’s Medical Center

Minthorne Street

Via Silive

A massive warehouse on Tompkinsville’s Minthorne Street is set to be converted into a barbecue joint. That conversion will also create room for more shops to open in this building, which is currently home to the Flagship Brewery. In addition, the developer is also planning to spruce up the Victory Boulevard and Bay Street side of this property and transform this area into “Staten Island’s newest hot spot.”

Via Silive

Staten Island Urby

Photo by Max Touhey

One of the most high-profile projects to debut on Staten Island in recent years, Staten Island Urby is a mini-neighborhood unto itself (within the larger Stapleton community, that is). The enormous rental comes with amenities like a 5,000-foot-urban farm, a restaurant, a coffee shop, and a swimming pool—and that’s just the first phase. The second phase will bring an additional 330 apartments to Staten Island’s North Shore.

Photo by Max Touhey

125 Edgewater Street

Via Caliendo Architects

On the eastern shore of Staten Island, development firm V Capital Management has planned a residential project that could feature nearly 400 apartments. The waterfront plot is currently zoned for manufacturing, and the developer is debating between a 371-unit project or a 396-unit one. In either case, the apartments will be spread out among three buildings over 18 acres of land. Twenty percent of the apartments here will be affordable, and there are also plans for a 60,000-square-foot waterfront esplanade.

Via Caliendo Architects

80 Scarboro Avenue

Via Google Maps

Earlier this year, plans were filed for a 72-unit building in Rosebank. The building will only stand three stories tall, and apartments here will measure 980 square feet on average. Plans also call for a 69-car garage and a 16-car parking lot.

Via Google Maps

Mount Manresa Jesuit Retreat Redevelopment

When the Savo Brothers decided to redevelop the Mount Manresa Jesuit Retreat into a 250-unit townhouse project, despite community protests, Staten Island Borough President James Oddo decided to saddle the project with street names that are synonyms for “deceit” and “greed.” The developers were undeterred and filed plans for the project in August last year.

New York City Farm Colony

Photo by Nathan Kensinger

Located across from the Seaview Hospital development, this equally ambitious project will restore many buildings within the former New York City Farm Colony, and create 344 condos marketed towards New Yorkers over 55 years of age. In addition, developer Raymond Masucci also intends to build 17 acres of landscaped outdoor space within this massive campus.

Photo by Nathan Kensinger

Seaview Hospital

Via NYCEDC

In August 2016, the city announced that it was taking this neglected hospital campus and transforming it into a mixed-use, health-focused development. A Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEI) was released last December, and the city is looking for a developer to create a campus with housing, farm-to-table restaurants, community farms, and landscaped areas that promote physical activity.

Via NYCEDC

Freshkills Park

Once the world’s largest landfill, this massive Staten Island site is now in the midst of being transformed into a 2,200-acre park. While Freshkill Park’s development will take place in multiple phases until the late 2030s, several sections have already opened, including a playground, a ball field, and an extensive bicycle track. When complete, the park will feature five distinct sections and be almost three times the size of Central Park.

1 Nassau Place

Via Google Maps

This vast, empty stretch of land could soon be home to a massive residential complex. Bridgewater Capital Partners paid $30 million to acquire this piece of land in southern Staten Island and wants to bring an assisted living facility for seniors, retail, and apartments to the site. The land is currently zoned for industrial, retail, and office use, and has the potential to build up to 3.5 million square feet.

Via Google Maps

Conference House Park

via Sage and Coombe

This reconstruction project on the island’s southern tip has been in the works for years now. Construction on the park pavilion is finally expected to get underway sometime this year, and when completed, it will provide 4,200 square feet of space for concerts, events, and weddings. The site has a storied past having served as a Lenape Indian burial ground for thousands of years before Europeans arrived; later, it hosted the unsuccessful Staten Island Peace Conference held there on September 11, 1776.

via Sage and Coombe