clock menu more-arrow no yes

New York City's most iconic buildings, mapped

From the Empire State Building to the Statue of Liberty, these buildings are the heart and soul of this city

View as Map

Fact: No city's skyline is quite as iconic or beautiful as New York City's. Chicago may be the place where the skyscraper was born, and cities like Seattle and San Francisco have recognizable landmarks, but New York is where some of the world's most important buildings—the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, the Seagram Building—can be found.

But New York's skyline icons aren't limited to tall towers: Grand Central Terminal and the New York Public Library are the pinnacle of Beaux Arts beauty, while outer-borough landmarks like the New York State Pavilion in Flushing, Queens, show that architectural innovation isn't merely limited to Manhattan.

Some new structures, meanwhile, like Santiago Calatrava’s Oculus in Lower Manhattan, are now so indelible to the urban fabric that they’ve already achieved the status of icons.

In coming up with a list of New York's most iconic buildings, it's impossible to keep it to 10 or 15 landmarks; so here, we've chosen 30 of the city's biggest, best architectural icons.

[Note: Points are listed geographically, starting in lower Manhattan and continuing north, then through the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, and Staten Island.]

Read More

1. Brooklyn Bridge

Copy Link
Brooklyn Bridge
New York, NY 10038

Okay, it's not a building, but the Brooklyn Bridge is one of the most well-known symbols of New York City—so much so that the East River crossing can now be found on T-shirts, posters, and other ephemera. The more than mile-long span is notable for its suspension construction, which was considered revolutionary when it was built in the 1880s, and its beautiful stone anchorages, with their elegant Gothic arches.

Two bridges in the evening. In the distance are many city buildings. Shutterstock

2. Statue of Liberty National Monument

Copy Link
(212) 363-3200
Visit Website

The Statue of Liberty is easily the most famous and recognizable New York structure, and we have the French to thank for it. Sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi designed 151-foot-tall Lady Liberty while Gustave Eiffel built it (American Richard Morris Hunt created the pedestal). It was dedicated on October 28, 1886. Constructed of copper, the statue didn’t take on its well-known blue-green patina until it was 20 years old, and at that point, it was almost painted over. After September 11, the statue was closed to the public until 2009; that year, she saw her most visitors ever: 3.2 million.

3. One World Trade Center

Copy Link
One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St
New York, NY 10006

The road to One World Trade Center’s completion was long and rocky—one that included several different designs for the building (the ultimate winner: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill) and many, many delays—but the building finally welcomed its first tenants in 2014, 13 years after the terrorist attacks that destroyed the Twin Towers. Its height, 1,776 feet, makes it the tallest building in the city.

4. Oculus

Copy Link
33-69 Vesey St
New York, NY 10007
(212) 284-9982
Visit Website

Yes, it was too expensive; yes, it’s basically an overblown mall; but Santiago Calatrava’s spiky shell, which crowns the World Trade Center Transportation Hub, is also, several years after it opened, a Lower Manhattan icon. It has quickly become a place where New Yorkers (and tourists, but that was a given) go to hang out, or commute, or fill time when they’re between appointments downtown. And for all of its faults, it’s hard not to feel a sense of awe walking into the cathedral-like, light-filled space. 

5. Woolworth Building

Copy Link
Woolworth Bldg
New York, NY 10007

Cass Gilbert's copper-topped skyscraper was once described as "the cathedral of commerce," thanks to its neo-Gothic architecture and its owner, retail guru F. W. Woolworth. The elegant building is currently undergoing big changes, as the uppermost floors are converted into ultra-luxury condos; thankfully, that won't disturb the ornate lobby, which is off-limits to the general public but can be viewed on regular tours of the interior. 

The interior of a building. The ceiling has yellow stained glass. The walls are elaborately designed with arches. Shutterstock

6. 56 Leonard Street

Copy Link
56 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013

Despite being called “doubtful” in the fifth edition of the AIA Guide to New York City, published before the building’s completion, the towering stack of boxes has indeed become an icon of New York’s skyline. The 60-story condo designed by Herzog & de Meuron has gained notoriety for its Jenga-like appearance, and has been wooing high-paying buyers to its condos since it hit the market in February 2013.

An aerial view of many city buildings and skyscrapers. There is a body of water in the distance. It is sunset. Getty Images

7. The Cooper Union

Copy Link
30 Cooper Sq
New York, NY 10003
(212) 353-4100
Visit Website

The historic Foundation Building of the Cooper Union was constructed between 1853 and 1859 under the design of the college’s namesake, Peter Cooper. The Italianate brownstone building is the oldest extant structure in America to be framed with steel beams. Fun fact: Cooper created room for an elevator shaft predating the invention, believing the technology would come along soon enough. The building’s Great Hall has hosted many-a great speaker, including Mark Twain and presidents Lincoln, Grant, Cleveland, Taft, Theodore Roosevelt, Wilson, Clinton, and Obama.

In the foreground is a city intersection with cars and people in the street. In the distance is a large brown building with many windows. Shutterstock

8. Flatiron Building

Copy Link
Flatiron Building
New York, NY 10010

When it topped out in 1902 at 20 stories, the Flatiron Building was one of the tallest structures in New York City. Although it's lost that distinction, its triangular shape helps it stay one of the city's most recognizable buildings. The Flatiron Building was originally named for George A. Fuller, founder of the Fuller Company and "father of the skyscraper." The structure, which resembles a Greek column with its limestone base, glazed terra cotta shaft, and capital, was designed by Chicago architect Daniel Burnham.

A street with cars. On the sides of the street are city buildings. The Flatiron Building, a skyscraper, is in the distance. Shutterstock

9. Empire State Building

Copy Link
Empire State Building
New York, NY 10001

There may be taller buildings, or more innovative ones, but this Art Deco beauty is perhaps New York City's most beloved building. It was the tallest skyscraper in the world upon completion in 1931 (surpassing the Chrysler Building, which was finished in 1930), and remained so until the original World Trade Center topped out in the 1970s. Its mark on the skyline is indelible, but it's also a pop-culture icon, having appeared in movies and TV shows and varied as the original King Kong, Sleepless in Seattle, and Doctor Who. 

10. United Nations Headquarters

Copy Link
(212) 963-4475
Visit Website

Formerly the site of a slaughterhouse, the multi-acre area that's home to the United Nations complex was purchased from William Zeckendorf Sr. in the 1940s. The complex is composed of several main buildings, among them the 39-story Secretariat building and oft-pictured General Assembly building, which were conceived by Oscar Niemeyer and Le Corbusier.

A large building. In front of the building are multiple assorted flags from different countries. Shutterstock

11. Grand Central Terminal

Copy Link

This century-old Beaux Arts beauty is home to many hidden treasures. There's the Whispering Gallery, close to the iconic Oyster Bar; the Campbell Apartment, a cocktail bar hidden within an old office; the secret tunnel that connected the train station to the Waldorf Astoria Hotel; and the fabled "M42," a bunker that may contain electrical equipment, but no one really knows. But even if you never uncover its secrets, you won't be missing out: The terminal's grand main concourse is perhaps the prettiest train depot in the country. (And certainly this city.)

A train station. The ceiling is green with a painted pattern. On the floor are many people walking. There are archways and windows. Shutterstock

12. Chrysler Building

Copy Link

If the Empire State Building is the best-known of New York City's skyscrapers, then the Chrysler Building is perhaps the city's loveliest. It was very briefly the tallest building in the world (the ESB took its crown when it opened), but the stunning Art Deco architecture is what sets it apart. Designed by William Van Alen, the Chrysler is known for its elegant, terraced crown, with a sunburst pattern; its grand eagles, which stand sentry on the 61st floor; and the radiator caps on the 31st floor, an homage to the company whose name graces the building. 

13. New York Public Library

Copy Link
476 5th Ave
New York, NY 10018
(917) 275-6975
Visit Website

The landmarked main branch of the New York Public Library, designed by Carrère and Hastings, took more than a decade to design and build, eventually opening in 1911. Two Tennessee marble lions, known as Patience and Fortitude, flank the Beaux Arts structure’s main entrance along Fifth Avenue; inside, the Rose Reading Room may be the loveliest and most majestic public space in New York. (It’s also one of the city’s newest landmarks.) The 51-foot high ceilings feature intricate sculpted moldings and painted clouds. 

14. 30 Rockefeller Center

Copy Link
30 Rockefeller Center
New York, NY 10020

The erstwhile General Electric building (it was renamed for new owner Comcast in 2015) is the anchor of Rockefeller Center in Midtown. And thanks to its myriad attractions—the Top of the Rock observation deck, NBC's studios, the Rainbow Room—the Art Deco tower is a landmark in its own right. It's also the setting for one of the most famous NYC photographs: Lunch Atop a Skyscraper, taken in 1932 while the building was under construction, was taken (and possibly staged) on the building's 69th floor.

15. St. Patrick's Cathedral

Copy Link

New York City's most famous house of worship is a neo-Gothic marvel, with ornate decorative elements—spires, stained glass windows, marble cladding—that make it stand out amid Midtown's skyscrapers. A massive renovation project, which began in 2012, has restored some of the church's most iconic elements, including its heavy bronze doors, its ceiling, and the massive main organ. 

In the foreground is a city street with yellow taxi cabs. In the distance is a church surrounded by other city buildings. Shutterstock

16. Seagram Building

Copy Link
Seagram Building, 375 Park Ave
New York, NY 10152

The Seagram Building is one of the most notable of creations of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, a founding father of modern architecture. The dark, glassy building came into being in the late 1950s when Phyllis Lambert, the visionary daughter of Seagram's founder Samuel Bronfman, took the reins for the tower's design and ascent; she’s credited with advocating for Mies van der Rohe’s minimalist design of glass and bronze. The 515-foot, 38-story building was dedicated in 1959, and is considered a precedent-setting structure for modern corporate architecture.

17. Lever House

Copy Link
Lever House
New York, NY 10022

This skyscraper debuted in 1952 as the American headquarters of the British soap company Lever Brothers, and it marked a shift along Park Avenue. The thoroughfare, previously dominated by masonry apartment buildings, soon became a boulevard of glass office towers. Lever House was designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill as a glass-box skyscraper with an innovative courtyard and public space, and was the second curtain wall skyscraper in New York City (after the UN Building).

18. Radio City Music Hall

Copy Link
1260 6th Ave
New York, NY 10020
(212) 465-6741
Visit Website

Radio City's neon marquee has been welcoming performers and visitors alike to the beautiful old theater since 1932. And its interiors are just a beautiful as the outside: Designed by Donald Deskey, every bit of the theater, from the grand staircase to the bathrooms, is gloriously retro. 

The exterior of a concert hall. There is a neon sign that reads Radio City Music Hall. There are people standing outside of the concert hall. Shutterstock

19. 432 Park Avenue

Copy Link
432 Park Ave
New York, NY 10022

Rafael Viñoly’s supertall skyscraper—the city’s tallest residential building, for now—is an exercise in minimalism, with an unadorned concrete facade punctuated by oversized square windows. The building is loved by some, despised by others, but one thing’s for sure: It’s changed the game, as far as ultra-luxury real estate in New York goes. (We can overlook the fact that its design was basically inspired by a trash can, considering it was executed in a rather elegant fashion.)

20. The Plaza

Copy Link
768 5th Ave
New York, NY 10019
(212) 759-3000
Visit Website

Despite ownership issues and condo disputes, the Plaza still maintains an air of distinction and awe. The French Renaissance chateau-style building, designed by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh, has starred in dozens of movies——Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, The Way We Were, and The Great Gatsby, just to name a few——and has a long-standing relationship with Eloise. The neoclassical Palm Court, with Caen stone-clad walls and a colonnade of marble columns, and the German Renaissance Revival-style Oak Room are among the landmarked interiors.

21. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

Copy Link
10 Lincoln Center Plaza
New York, NY 10023
(212) 875-5456
Visit Website

A Robert Moses creation, Lincoln Center is less one single noteworthy building than a collection of midcentury gems, including spaces designed by legends like Eero Saarinen, Philip Johnson, Max Abramovitz, and Hugh Hardy, all under the direction of Wallace Harrison. The Center’s main plaza and its iconic illuminated fountain is a New York City site landmark in its own right. A complex-wide renovation project upgraded the superblock in the late aughts, and Diller Scofidio + Renfro revamped the public spaces, creating a lawn and redesigning several theaters.

22. The Met Breuer

Copy Link
945 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10021
(212) 731-1675
Visit Website

This imposing concrete structure served as the Whitney Museum’s third home before it moved to its latest building in the Meatpacking District. It was designed by the Hungarian-born and Bauhaus-trained architect Marcel Breuer, and today is hailed as one of the Upper East Side’s most notable buildings. But that wasn’t always the case: When it debuted in 1966, the modernist structure—in a neighborhood of historic townhouses and apartment buildings—was considered somber and brutal.

23. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Copy Link
1000 5th Ave
New York, NY 10028
(212) 535-7710
Visit Website

Calvert Vaux, the museum's original architect, designed a High Victorian Gothic-style building for the museum, but the its president soon regarded the building as a "mistake" with its outdated style, and engulfed the structure with further expansions. Architects like Richard Morris Hunt, McKim Mead & White, and firm Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates have contributed to the structure in its century of existence, helping to make it the largest museum in the United States.

The interior of a museum. Some of the walls are glass. There are statues and sculptures. People are sitting and standing in the room looking at the various art objects. Shutterstock

24. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Copy Link
1071 5th Ave
New York, NY 10128
(212) 423-3500
Visit Website

One of Frank Lloyd Wright’s few New York City creations is also one of the architect’s masterpieces, a curved nautilus of concrete that’s inspired—as many Wright buildings are—by nature and organic forms. Though it was not universally beloved when it opened in 1959, it’s gone on to become one of the city’s most popular museums—and it’s a good bet that many of those visitors are there for the building itself, not just the art within.

A large white circular building. In the foreground is a city intersection with a yellow tax cab. Shutterstock

25. Yankee Stadium

Copy Link
1 E 161st St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 293-4300
Visit Website

Preservationists and baseball fans alike were not happy when the old Yankee Stadium, a 1923 gem dubbed "the House that Ruth Built," was put on the chopping block in favor of a new, updated ballpark. But the new stadium, which opened in 2009, pays homage to the old while adding modern amenities, including larger seats and better food options. And, to be fair, part of what makes it so iconic is the team that plays there.

A large sports stadium. The words Yankee Stadium are displayed prominently on top of the stadium. There is a street in the foreground. Shutterstock

26. New York State Pavilion

Copy Link
(212) 639-9675
Visit Website

The 1964 World’s Fair took place in what is now known as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, once a vast Queens tidal marsh and garbage dump that was converted to a park to host the 1939 exposition. For the 1964 extravaganza, the site was transformed once again to showcase mid-20th-century American architecture and technology, with a futurist style influenced by car culture, jet aircraft, the Space Age, and the Atomic Age. While most of the pavilions have since been demolished, the 12-story high, stainless steel Unisphere still stands, as does the New York State Pavilion (which is currently closed to the public, though there are groups who want to change that).

A large circular structure with two towers to the side of it. In the foreground is a green lawn and trees. Shutterstock

27. TWA Flight Center

Copy Link

The TWA Flight Center was designed by Eero Saarinen and completed in 1962, one year after Saarinen's death. The building was conceived as a hyper-efficient terminal meant to symbolize a bird with its characteristic swooping form. After an extensive renovation that preserved the midcentury icon, the terminal reopened to the public this year as part of the new TWA Hotel.

A building with an angular shaped roof. In the foreground is a green lawn. Amy Plitt

28. Williamsburgh Savings Bank Building

Copy Link
One Hanson Place
Brooklyn, NY 11243

For decades, this limestone structure towered over Brooklyn as the borough's tallest building. While it no longer holds that distinction (Downtown Brooklyn's residential boom took care of that), it remains one of the borough's biggest landmarks. Even more stunning is its interior: The building's gorgeous lobby, which formerly operated as an event space (the Brooklyn Flea used to live there), has soaring ceilings, columns, and the original bank vault. It's also occasionally the butt of jokes due to its, uh, phallic nature.

A post shared by Andrew B. White (@andrewbwhite) on

29. Brooklyn Public Library

Copy Link
10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(718) 230-2100
Visit Website

Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Branch is one of New York City’s greatest literary destinations, containing a plethora of historical collections, contemporary works, and practically any scholarly materials one might need. And its Art Deco building on Grand Army Plaza, built in the 1930s, is a beaut—pay special attention to the gold figures at the entrance, which represent different notable literary figures, including Moby Dick, Rip Van Winkle, and Brooklyn’s own Walt Whitman.

A large ornately decorated door. Above the door are the words Brooklyn Public Library. Shutterstock

30. Verrazano–Narrows Bridge

Copy Link

One of the last major projects of planner Robert Moses, this suspension bridge connecting Staten Island to Brooklyn is the longest in the United States. It was designed by Othmar Ammann, who was also the brains behind the George Washington Bridge and the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge, among many others. The construction of the Verrazano, which took five years and claimed three lives, was famously chronicled by Gay Talese in his book The Bridge. Today, it’s also known as the the starting point of the New York City Marathon.

Loading comments...

1. Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge, New York, NY 10038
Two bridges in the evening. In the distance are many city buildings. Shutterstock

Okay, it's not a building, but the Brooklyn Bridge is one of the most well-known symbols of New York City—so much so that the East River crossing can now be found on T-shirts, posters, and other ephemera. The more than mile-long span is notable for its suspension construction, which was considered revolutionary when it was built in the 1880s, and its beautiful stone anchorages, with their elegant Gothic arches.

Brooklyn Bridge
New York, NY 10038

2. Statue of Liberty National Monument

New York, NY 10004

The Statue of Liberty is easily the most famous and recognizable New York structure, and we have the French to thank for it. Sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi designed 151-foot-tall Lady Liberty while Gustave Eiffel built it (American Richard Morris Hunt created the pedestal). It was dedicated on October 28, 1886. Constructed of copper, the statue didn’t take on its well-known blue-green patina until it was 20 years old, and at that point, it was almost painted over. After September 11, the statue was closed to the public until 2009; that year, she saw her most visitors ever: 3.2 million.

3. One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St, New York, NY 10006

The road to One World Trade Center’s completion was long and rocky—one that included several different designs for the building (the ultimate winner: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill) and many, many delays—but the building finally welcomed its first tenants in 2014, 13 years after the terrorist attacks that destroyed the Twin Towers. Its height, 1,776 feet, makes it the tallest building in the city.

One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St
New York, NY 10006

4. Oculus

33-69 Vesey St, New York, NY 10007

Yes, it was too expensive; yes, it’s basically an overblown mall; but Santiago Calatrava’s spiky shell, which crowns the World Trade Center Transportation Hub, is also, several years after it opened, a Lower Manhattan icon. It has quickly become a place where New Yorkers (and tourists, but that was a given) go to hang out, or commute, or fill time when they’re between appointments downtown. And for all of its faults, it’s hard not to feel a sense of awe walking into the cathedral-like, light-filled space. 

33-69 Vesey St
New York, NY 10007

5. Woolworth Building

Woolworth Bldg, New York, NY 10007
The interior of a building. The ceiling has yellow stained glass. The walls are elaborately designed with arches. Shutterstock

Cass Gilbert's copper-topped skyscraper was once described as "the cathedral of commerce," thanks to its neo-Gothic architecture and its owner, retail guru F. W. Woolworth. The elegant building is currently undergoing big changes, as the uppermost floors are converted into ultra-luxury condos; thankfully, that won't disturb the ornate lobby, which is off-limits to the general public but can be viewed on regular tours of the interior. 

Woolworth Bldg
New York, NY 10007

6. 56 Leonard Street

56 Leonard St, New York, NY 10013
An aerial view of many city buildings and skyscrapers. There is a body of water in the distance. It is sunset. Getty Images

Despite being called “doubtful” in the fifth edition of the AIA Guide to New York City, published before the building’s completion, the towering stack of boxes has indeed become an icon of New York’s skyline. The 60-story condo designed by Herzog & de Meuron has gained notoriety for its Jenga-like appearance, and has been wooing high-paying buyers to its condos since it hit the market in February 2013.

56 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013

7. The Cooper Union

30 Cooper Sq, New York, NY 10003
In the foreground is a city intersection with cars and people in the street. In the distance is a large brown building with many windows. Shutterstock

The historic Foundation Building of the Cooper Union was constructed between 1853 and 1859 under the design of the college’s namesake, Peter Cooper. The Italianate brownstone building is the oldest extant structure in America to be framed with steel beams. Fun fact: Cooper created room for an elevator shaft predating the invention, believing the technology would come along soon enough. The building’s Great Hall has hosted many-a great speaker, including Mark Twain and presidents Lincoln, Grant, Cleveland, Taft, Theodore Roosevelt, Wilson, Clinton, and Obama.

30 Cooper Sq
New York, NY 10003

8. Flatiron Building

Flatiron Building, New York, NY 10010
A street with cars. On the sides of the street are city buildings. The Flatiron Building, a skyscraper, is in the distance. Shutterstock

When it topped out in 1902 at 20 stories, the Flatiron Building was one of the tallest structures in New York City. Although it's lost that distinction, its triangular shape helps it stay one of the city's most recognizable buildings. The Flatiron Building was originally named for George A. Fuller, founder of the Fuller Company and "father of the skyscraper." The structure, which resembles a Greek column with its limestone base, glazed terra cotta shaft, and capital, was designed by Chicago architect Daniel Burnham.

Flatiron Building
New York, NY 10010

9. Empire State Building

Empire State Building, New York, NY 10001

There may be taller buildings, or more innovative ones, but this Art Deco beauty is perhaps New York City's most beloved building. It was the tallest skyscraper in the world upon completion in 1931 (surpassing the Chrysler Building, which was finished in 1930), and remained so until the original World Trade Center topped out in the 1970s. Its mark on the skyline is indelible, but it's also a pop-culture icon, having appeared in movies and TV shows and varied as the original King Kong, Sleepless in Seattle, and Doctor Who. 

Empire State Building
New York, NY 10001

10. United Nations Headquarters

New York, NY 10017
A large building. In front of the building are multiple assorted flags from different countries. Shutterstock

Formerly the site of a slaughterhouse, the multi-acre area that's home to the United Nations complex was purchased from William Zeckendorf Sr. in the 1940s. The complex is composed of several main buildings, among them the 39-story Secretariat building and oft-pictured General Assembly building, which were conceived by Oscar Niemeyer and Le Corbusier.

11. Grand Central Terminal

New York, NY 10017
A train station. The ceiling is green with a painted pattern. On the floor are many people walking. There are archways and windows. Shutterstock

This century-old Beaux Arts beauty is home to many hidden treasures. There's the Whispering Gallery, close to the iconic Oyster Bar; the Campbell Apartment, a cocktail bar hidden within an old office; the secret tunnel that connected the train station to the Waldorf Astoria Hotel; and the fabled "M42," a bunker that may contain electrical equipment, but no one really knows. But even if you never uncover its secrets, you won't be missing out: The terminal's grand main concourse is perhaps the prettiest train depot in the country. (And certainly this city.)

12. Chrysler Building

New York, NY 10174

If the Empire State Building is the best-known of New York City's skyscrapers, then the Chrysler Building is perhaps the city's loveliest. It was very briefly the tallest building in the world (the ESB took its crown when it opened), but the stunning Art Deco architecture is what sets it apart. Designed by William Van Alen, the Chrysler is known for its elegant, terraced crown, with a sunburst pattern; its grand eagles, which stand sentry on the 61st floor; and the radiator caps on the 31st floor, an homage to the company whose name graces the building. 

13. New York Public Library

476 5th Ave, New York, NY 10018

The landmarked main branch of the New York Public Library, designed by Carrère and Hastings, took more than a decade to design and build, eventually opening in 1911. Two Tennessee marble lions, known as Patience and Fortitude, flank the Beaux Arts structure’s main entrance along Fifth Avenue; inside, the Rose Reading Room may be the loveliest and most majestic public space in New York. (It’s also one of the city’s newest landmarks.) The 51-foot high ceilings feature intricate sculpted moldings and painted clouds. 

476 5th Ave
New York, NY 10018

14. 30 Rockefeller Center

30 Rockefeller Center, New York, NY 10020

The erstwhile General Electric building (it was renamed for new owner Comcast in 2015) is the anchor of Rockefeller Center in Midtown. And thanks to its myriad attractions—the Top of the Rock observation deck, NBC's studios, the Rainbow Room—the Art Deco tower is a landmark in its own right. It's also the setting for one of the most famous NYC photographs: Lunch Atop a Skyscraper, taken in 1932 while the building was under construction, was taken (and possibly staged) on the building's 69th floor.

30 Rockefeller Center
New York, NY 10020

15. St. Patrick's Cathedral

New York, NY 10022
In the foreground is a city street with yellow taxi cabs. In the distance is a church surrounded by other city buildings. Shutterstock

New York City's most famous house of worship is a neo-Gothic marvel, with ornate decorative elements—spires, stained glass windows, marble cladding—that make it stand out amid Midtown's skyscrapers. A massive renovation project, which began in 2012, has restored some of the church's most iconic elements, including its heavy bronze doors, its ceiling, and the massive main organ. 

16. Seagram Building

Seagram Building, 375 Park Ave, New York, NY 10152