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Mapping the NYC buildings that became landmarks in 2018

Meet all of New York City’s newest landmarks

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While 2018 wasn’t quite the banner year for historic preservation like 2017—NYC got three rare, new interior landmarks last year—several beloved structures finally got the recognition (and protection) they deserve. Those include the Riegelmann Boardwalk along the Coney Island waterfront, and 550 Madison Avenue, Philip Johnson’s 37-story Postmdodern icon.

The LPC also recognized buildings in the outer-outer-boroughs, including the Far Rockaways, where a firehouse and police precinct were designated. Check out every single structure that became a landmark in 2018, below.

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1. Dr. Maurice T. Lewis House

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404 55th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220

Following the efforts of hundreds of Sunset Park residents, the neighborhood’s last freestanding mansion was designated a landmark in March. The house was at one point set to be replaced by a seven-story apartment building. The Renaissance Revival structure was designed by architect Richard Thomas Short and built in 1907 for Dr. Maurice T. Lewis, the president of the Bay Ridge Savings Bank.

Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

2. Hotel Seville

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22 E 29th St
New York, NY 10016

Now known as the James New York, the former Hotel Seville was built between 1901-04, and designed by Harry Allan Jacobs. The hotel is a distinct example of Beaux Arts-style architecture in the Nomad area. The hotel building saw the addition of an annex designed by Charles T. Mott between 1906-07. That was also part of the LPC’s designation when this building was declared a landmark in March this year.

Joe Strini/PropertyShark

3. Emmet Building

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95 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10016

Located across from the James New York, this Neo-Renaissance structure was designed for American politician Thomas Addis Emmet in 1912. Emmet maintained his residence on the top floors of this 16-story building, which was designed by Barney & Colt. The lower floors were used as offices and still are to this day. The Emmet building was designated along with Hotel Seville in March.

The Emmet building is in the center.
Via Google Maps

4. The Benjamin Franklin High School

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260 Pleasant Ave
New York, NY 10029

East Harlem’s first high school, which was established by educator Leonard Covello in the mid-20th century, was designated an NYC landmark in March. The LPC commended the Georgian Revival building’s brick and limestone facade as well as the building’s history—it was a focal point of social and political engagement in the years that followed its opening. This imposing, two block-long structure, which overlooks the Harlem River, is now home to the Manhattan School of Science and Math, and the Isaac Newton Middle School for Math and Science.

Via Landmarks Preservation Commission.

5. Richard Webber Harlem Packing House

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207 E 119th St
New York, NY 10035

Built in 1895, the six-story Richard Webber Harlem Packing House building functioned as a slaughterhouse, retail space, and meat market from the turn of the century to about 1928. Designed by the firm Bartholomew & John P. Walther, the structure is notable for its grand arches and the terra cotta cow head reliefs on the central bay of the facade. The well-known butcher Richard Webber operated his business out of this building and later went on to establish one of the largest such businesses in the city. It became a landmark in March, with the LPC calling it a “fine example” of 19th-century architecture.

Landmarks Preservation Commission

6. P.S. 109

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215 E 99th St
New York, NY 10029

Built at the turn of the 20th century, this five-story building originally functioned as a school that embraced the social and urban education reform taking place in the city at that time. When it still functioned as a school building, it served 2,000 students across its five floors. In 2015, the limestone and brick building was converted into affordable housing for local artists and is now known as El Barrio’s Artspace PS109. The building became a landmark in March.

Barrett Reiter

7. The Dime Savings Bank of Williamsburgh

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209 Havemeyer St
Brooklyn, NY 11211

This former bank building was built between 1906-08, and designed by noted Brooklyn architectural firm Helmle & Huberty. It was built during a time of tremendous growth in Williamsburg following the construction of the Williamsburg Bridge in 1903. The LPC called this a significant example of the early 20th-century savings bank buildings across the city (and shouldn’t be confused with the similarly-named building in Downtown Brooklyn). Even with its landmark designation, which happened in March, the structure is now set to be restored and incorporated as part of a 22-story residential building that will rise behind it.

Via Landmarks Preservation Commission.

8. The Riegelmann Boardwalk at Coney Island

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37, Riegelmann Boardwalk
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 946-1350
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One of New York City’s most beloved icons was finally designated a landmark on its 95th anniversary. The designation capped a years long effort by local residents and elected officials to protect the 2.7 mile stretch of the boardwalk between West 37th Street and Brighton 15th Street. The Riegelmann Boardwalk—named after politician Edward J. Riegelmann—officially opened on May 15, 1923, and has become one of the world’s best known waterfront promenades since. The boardwalk sustained heavy damage during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and parts of the boardwalk have had to be replaced as a result. Some other sections may be altered in the future—as a scenic landmark, the boardwalk officially falls under the jurisdiction of The Public Design Commission, and the LPC only plays an advisory role—but the LPC noted that the boardwalk must be recognized for its social and cultural significance to the city.

Shutterstock.com

9. The Far Rockaway Firehouse

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11-16 Central Ave
Far Rockaway, NY 11691

Designed by the firm Hoppin & Koen, this three-story Renaissance Revival structure dates back to around 1912. It is also known as Engine Companies 264 & 328/Hook and Ladder 134 and is notable for its arched vehicle bays, monumental columns, and rusticated limestone on its ground floors. The LPC called it an outstanding example of early 20th-century civic buildings, and said it was reflective of the tremendous growth taking place in Far Rockaway at that time.

Via Google Maps

10. The 53rd Precinct Police Station 

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16-12 Mott Ave
Far Rockaway, NY 11691

Completed around 1929, the former 53rd Precinct Police Station (now the 101st precinct) was designed by Thomas E. O’Brien who also served as the police department’s superintendent of buildings at the time. The three-story building combines Colonial Revival and Renaissance Revival styles, and the LPC commended it for bringing architectural expression to municipal services buildings.

Via Google Maps

11. 550 Madison Ave

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550 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10022

Considered Postermodernism’s first commercial skyscraper, Philip Johnson’s 550 Madison was officially declared a New York City landmark in July. The designation capped a year-long effort by architecture critics and preservationists to protect the iconic building, after plans of a Snøhetta redesign surfaced. The new owners of the building were supportive of the designation, and have now come up with what they call a “preservation-first” revamp for the building. The new designs will have to be approved by the LPC before construction moves forward.

Via LPC

12. Hans S. Christian Memorial Kindergarten

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236 President St
Brooklyn, NY 11231

Earlier this year, Carroll Gardens residents rallied to the defense of the former Hans S. Christian Memorial Kindergarten on President Street after news emerged that it was set to be replaced by a luxury condo. The LPC then decided to consider the former kindergarten building and its adjoining apartment building for designation; the agency designated the structures in September. The two buildings are notable for their association with Elmira Christian, an advocate for early childhood education, who ensured the preservation of these buildings toward the turn of the 20th century. Both buildings have operated as residences for several decades now.

Via Landmarks Preservation Commission.

13. 238 President St

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238 President St
Brooklyn, NY 11231

This was designated along with 236 President Street in September.

1. Dr. Maurice T. Lewis House

404 55th St, Brooklyn, NY 11220
Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

Following the efforts of hundreds of Sunset Park residents, the neighborhood’s last freestanding mansion was designated a landmark in March. The house was at one point set to be replaced by a seven-story apartment building. The Renaissance Revival structure was designed by architect Richard Thomas Short and built in 1907 for Dr. Maurice T. Lewis, the president of the Bay Ridge Savings Bank.

404 55th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220

2. Hotel Seville

22 E 29th St, New York, NY 10016
Joe Strini/PropertyShark

Now known as the James New York, the former Hotel Seville was built between 1901-04, and designed by Harry Allan Jacobs. The hotel is a distinct example of Beaux Arts-style architecture in the Nomad area. The hotel building saw the addition of an annex designed by Charles T. Mott between 1906-07. That was also part of the LPC’s designation when this building was declared a landmark in March this year.

22 E 29th St
New York, NY 10016

3. Emmet Building

95 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016
The Emmet building is in the center.
Via Google Maps

Located across from the James New York, this Neo-Renaissance structure was designed for American politician Thomas Addis Emmet in 1912. Emmet maintained his residence on the top floors of this 16-story building, which was designed by Barney & Colt. The lower floors were used as offices and still are to this day. The Emmet building was designated along with Hotel Seville in March.

95 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10016

4. The Benjamin Franklin High School

260 Pleasant Ave, New York, NY 10029
Via Landmarks Preservation Commission.

East Harlem’s first high school, which was established by educator Leonard Covello in the mid-20th century, was designated an NYC landmark in March. The LPC commended the Georgian Revival building’s brick and limestone facade as well as the building’s history—it was a focal point of social and political engagement in the years that followed its opening. This imposing, two block-long structure, which overlooks the Harlem River, is now home to the Manhattan School of Science and Math, and the Isaac Newton Middle School for Math and Science.

260 Pleasant Ave
New York, NY 10029

5. Richard Webber Harlem Packing House

207 E 119th St, New York, NY 10035
Landmarks Preservation Commission

Built in 1895, the six-story Richard Webber Harlem Packing House building functioned as a slaughterhouse, retail space, and meat market from the turn of the century to about 1928. Designed by the firm Bartholomew & John P. Walther, the structure is notable for its grand arches and the terra cotta cow head reliefs on the central bay of the facade. The well-known butcher Richard Webber operated his business out of this building and later went on to establish one of the largest such businesses in the city. It became a landmark in March, with the LPC calling it a “fine example” of 19th-century architecture.

207 E 119th St
New York, NY 10035

6. P.S. 109

215 E 99th St, New York, NY 10029
Barrett Reiter

Built at the turn of the 20th century, this five-story building originally functioned as a school that embraced the social and urban education reform taking place in the city at that time. When it still functioned as a school building, it served 2,000 students across its five floors. In 2015, the limestone and brick building was converted into affordable housing for local artists and is now known as El Barrio’s Artspace PS109. The building became a landmark in March.

215 E 99th St
New York, NY 10029

7. The Dime Savings Bank of Williamsburgh

209 Havemeyer St, Brooklyn, NY 11211
Via Landmarks Preservation Commission.

This former bank building was built between 1906-08, and designed by noted Brooklyn architectural firm Helmle & Huberty. It was built during a time of tremendous growth in Williamsburg following the construction of the Williamsburg Bridge in 1903. The LPC called this a significant example of the early 20th-century savings bank buildings across the city (and shouldn’t be confused with the similarly-named building in Downtown Brooklyn). Even with its landmark designation, which happened in March, the structure is now set to be restored and incorporated as part of a 22-story residential building that will rise behind it.

209 Havemeyer St
Brooklyn, NY 11211

8. The Riegelmann Boardwalk at Coney Island

37, Riegelmann Boardwalk, Brooklyn, NY 11224
Shutterstock.com

One of New York City’s most beloved icons was finally designated a landmark on its 95th anniversary. The designation capped a years long effort by local residents and elected officials to protect the 2.7 mile stretch of the boardwalk between West 37th Street and Brighton 15th Street. The Riegelmann Boardwalk—named after politician Edward J. Riegelmann—officially opened on May 15, 1923, and has become one of the world’s best known waterfront promenades since. The boardwalk sustained heavy damage during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and parts of the boardwalk have had to be replaced as a result. Some other sections may be altered in the future—as a scenic landmark, the boardwalk officially falls under the jurisdiction of The Public Design Commission, and the LPC only plays an advisory role—but the LPC noted that the boardwalk must be recognized for its social and cultural significance to the city.

37, Riegelmann Boardwalk
Brooklyn, NY 11224

9. The Far Rockaway Firehouse

11-16 Central Ave, Far Rockaway, NY 11691
Via Google Maps

Designed by the firm Hoppin & Koen, this three-story Renaissance Revival structure dates back to around 1912. It is also known as Engine Companies 264 & 328/Hook and Ladder 134 and is notable for its arched vehicle bays, monumental columns, and rusticated limestone on its ground floors. The LPC called it an outstanding example of early 20th-century civic buildings, and said it was reflective of the tremendous growth taking place in Far Rockaway at that time.

11-16 Central Ave
Far Rockaway, NY 11691

10. The 53rd Precinct Police Station 

16-12 Mott Ave, Far Rockaway, NY 11691
Via Google Maps

Completed around 1929, the former 53rd Precinct Police Station (now the 101st precinct) was designed by Thomas E. O’Brien who also served as the police department’s superintendent of buildings at the time. The three-story building combines Colonial Revival and Renaissance Revival styles, and the LPC commended it for bringing architectural expression to municipal services buildings.

16-12 Mott Ave
Far Rockaway, NY 11691

11. 550 Madison Ave

550 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10022
Via LPC

Considered Postermodernism’s first commercial skyscraper, Philip Johnson’s 550 Madison was officially declared a New York City landmark in July. The designation capped a year-long effort by architecture critics and preservationists to protect the iconic building, after plans of a Snøhetta redesign surfaced. The new owners of the building were supportive of the designation, and have now come up with what they call a “preservation-first” revamp for the building. The new designs will have to be approved by the LPC before construction moves forward.

550 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10022

12. Hans S. Christian Memorial Kindergarten

236 President St, Brooklyn, NY 11231
Via Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Earlier this year, Carroll Gardens residents rallied to the defense of the former Hans S. Christian Memorial Kindergarten on President Street after news emerged that it was set to be replaced by a luxury condo. The LPC then decided to consider the former kindergarten building and its adjoining apartment building for designation; the agency designated the structures in September. The two buildings are notable for their association with Elmira Christian, an advocate for early childhood education, who ensured the preservation of these buildings toward the turn of the 20th century. Both buildings have operated as residences for several decades now.

236 President St
Brooklyn, NY 11231

13. 238 President St

238 President St, Brooklyn, NY 11231

This was designated along with 236 President Street in September.

238 President St
Brooklyn, NY 11231