clock menu more-arrow no yes

Mapping the NYC buildings that became landmarks in 2016

Meet all of New York City's newest landmarks

View as Map

In 2016, New York City's Landmarks Preservation Commission undertook an ambitious task: to calendar and decide whether or not to landmark 95 properties, many of which had been sitting in limbo for decades. The result of that clearing of the backlog was an unprecedented number of buildings, sites, and neighborhoods that received landmark status in 2016, along with two historic districts. This definitive list illustrates all the ones that made the cut.

Read More

1. Bergdorf Goodman

Copy Link
754 5th Ave
New York, NY 10019
(212) 753-7300
Visit Website

The Modern Classicist building was designed by Buckman & Kahn and built from 1927-28. While its landmarking was previously backed by Borough President Gale Brewer, it was opposed by the building’s owners. On December 13th, the building finally obtained landmark status.

2. 183-185 Broadway

Copy Link
183 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11211

This Italianate building is catty corner from Peter Luger and across the street from the Williamsburgh Savings Bank. The site is now occupied in part by Capital One Bank.

3. United Palace Theatre

Copy Link
4140 Broadway
New York, NY 10033
(212) 568-0915

Now the United Palace, the Hindu-Islamic style theater was designed by Thomas W. Lamb and built in 1929-30. The commission noted that the building “exemplifies the American movie palace at its most monumental and spectacular.”

4. Harlem YMCA

Copy Link
180 W 135th St
New York, NY 10030
(212) 912-2100
Visit Website

The LPC lauded Harlem’s YMCA at 181 West 135th Street, also known as the Jackie Robinson YMCA Youth Center, for its “significant role in shaping the civic and artistic culture of Harlem.”

5. Saint Barbara's Roman Catholic Church

Copy Link
138 Bleecker Street
New York, NY 11221

A Spanish Baroque Revival style building characterized by the LPC as “one of the most unusual and distinctive ecclesiastical buildings in New York City.” It’s designed by the same architect behind the Prospect Park boathouse and dates to 1910.

6. Lakeman-Cortelyou-Taylor House

Copy Link
2286 Richmond Rd
Staten Island, NY 10306

The Dutch Colonial house with an 18th-century addition dates to about 1683 to 1714.

7. 412 East 85th Street

Copy Link
412 E 85th St
New York, NY 10028

This Upper East Side house was built before 1861. Its one of only six pre-Civil War wood-frame houses that remain in the neighborhood.

8. The Brougham Cottage

Copy Link
4176 Amboy Rd
Staten Island, NY 10308

This Vernacular style house on Staten Island dates to the early 18th century. The LPC deemed it "a remarkable survivor of Staten Island’s rural past."

9. Excelsior Steam Power Company Building

Copy Link
33 Gold St
New York, NY 10038

The Excelsior Steam Power Company Building, a Romanesque Revival building at 33-43 Gold Street, dates to the mid- to late-1800s. It provided lighting and power to local factories and office buildings. It’s since been renovated for residential use.

10. Bowne Street Community Church

Copy Link
143-11 Roosevelt Ave
Flushing, NY 11354

The Romanesque Revival style church was built in the early 1890s and sports stained glass windows by the Tiffany Glass Co. of New York.

11. Sullivan-Thompson Historic District

Copy Link

The Sullivan-Thompson Historic District was designated not only for its aesthetic contribution to New York City, but also its cultural and historical impact. The area includes a collection of tenement buildings and historic storefronts that preservationists say speak to the Italian immigrant experience in late 19th- and early 20th-century New York City.

12. 601 Lexington Avenue

Copy Link
601 Lexington Ave (Citigroup Center)
New York, NY 10022
(212) 751-1007

The former Citicorp Center, now known simply as 601 Lexington Avenue, is the newest site within Midtown East to get landmark status. The building was designed by Hugh A. Stubbins & Associates and built from 1973 to 1978 and has a few distinctive features, including its 45-degree angular roof, and its base of four stilt-like columns.

13. Martin Erdmann Residence

Copy Link
57 E 55th St
New York, NY 10022

Built from 1908 to 1909, the Martin Erdmann house is an English Renaissance Revival style home designed by architectural firm Taylor & Levi. Its unique design has withstood the test of time and remained intact.

14. Graybar Building

Copy Link
420 Lexington Ave, Ste 2500
New York, NY 10170
(646) 356-4000
Visit Website

The Graybar Building was completed in 1927 as part of an East Midtown development project known as "Terminal City" when transit improvements spurred new construction in the area. The building is one of 12 that were granted landmark status to protect from potential rezoning in the area known as Greater Midtown East.

15. The Benjamin Hotel

Copy Link
125 East 50th Street
New York, NY 10022
(212) 715-2500
Visit Website

Emery Roth-designed hotel The Benjamin was built in 1925 and was once known as The Beverly. Its distinctive profile includes animal sculptures, Romanesque motifs, and several craftily designed setbacks.

16. Pershing Square Building

Copy Link
125 Park Ave
New York, NY 10017

The Pershing Square Building was finally landmarked, much to the chagrin of transportation advocates who argued that preserving it would hinder vital infrastructural improvements that are required to provide better accessibility to the subway. Nevertheless, the site achieved landmark status in November.

17. Shelton Hotel/Halloran House

Copy Link
252 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10016

This 31-story Romanesque Revival style building was designed by architect Arthur Loomis Harmon and completed in 1923, embracing the 1916 Zoning Law that required setbacks on city skyscrapers.

18. 400 Madison Avenue

Copy Link
400 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10017

Occupying an entire block along Madison Avenue between 47th and 48th streets, this Neo-Gothic style structure was designed by architect H. Craig Severance and has recently undergone restoration work to its terracotta facade.

19. Minnie E. Young Residence

Copy Link
19 E 54th St
New York, NY 10022

One of the earliest works from prominent architectural firm Hiss & Weeks was this Renaissance Revival style townhouse built from 1899 to 1900. In 1962, the site became headquarters for the Kenneth Beauty Salon, where star clients included Jacqueline Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, and Katharine Graham.

20. Yale Club of New York City

Copy Link
50 Vanderbilt Ave
New York, NY 10017
(212) 716-2100
Visit Website

Designed by James Gamble Rogers in 1915, this is yet another building that was landmarked just in time to protect it from Midtown East rezoning.

21. Hampton Shops Building

Copy Link
20 E 50th St
New York, NY 10022

Architects Rouse & Goldstone and Joseph Steinman designed this 11-story building in a style that was unique for its time. The building was constructed between 1915 and 1916 and sits across the street from the iconic St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

22. 18 East 41st Street

Copy Link
18 E 41st St
New York, NY 10017

The facade of this 21-story building is ornamented with blue, beige, and white terracotta and is the work of architects George & Edward Blum. The base has been “respectfully modified,” but the building’s unique arches and angles remain in place.

23. Williamsburgh Trust Company Building

Copy Link
177 S 5th St
Brooklyn, NY 11211

This former financial hub was completed in 1906 after being designed by architects Helmle, Huberty & Hudswell. In 1961, the building was converted into a church for the Holy Ukrainian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in Exile.

24. The Former Firehouse, Engine Company 29

Copy Link
160 Chambers St
New York, NY 10007

Built in 1832-33 as a three-story residence, the Former Firehouse, Engine Company 29, is one of the city’s earliest surviving structures of its kind.

25. 315 Broadway

Copy Link

This five-story Italianate style building was constructed in 1861 and still has its original facade fully intact.

26. 92 Harrison Street House

Copy Link
92 Harrison St
Staten Island, NY 10304

In June, the LPC designated this Greek Revival style house a city landmark due to its unique features and characteristics.

27. Prince's Bay Lighthouse Complex

Copy Link
6204 Hylan Blvd
Staten Island, NY 10309

The LPC declared the two-and-a-half story house at 6204 Hylan Boulevard and the land on which it’s situated a city landmark back in June. It is Staten Island’s second oldest lighthouse.

28. St. John's Episcopal Church

Copy Link
1333 Bay St
Staten Island, NY 10305
(718) 447-1605
Visit Website

This Gothic Revival style church was finally cleared from the LPC's Backlog Initiative and declared a city landmark in June.

29. George William and Anna Curtis House

Copy Link
234 Bard Ave
Staten Island, NY 10310

Abolitionist and literary figure George William Curtis and his wife once called this Italianate style house in Staten Island home. The house served a vital role as a place of gathering for prominent leaders of social movements, politics, and art.

30. Church of St. Joseph of the Holy Family (R.C.)

Copy Link
405 W 125th St
New York, NY 10027

St. Joseph of the Holy Family Roman Catholic Church at 405 West 125th Street prides itself on being "the oldest existing church in Harlem and above 44th Street in Manhattan."

31. Parish of St. Paul and Holy Rosary

Copy Link
121 E 117th St
New York, NY 10035

St. Paul Roman Catholic Church was built in 1908 and became a landmark over the summer.

32. Van Sicklen House

Copy Link
27 Gravesend Neck Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11223

The Lady Moody-Van Sicklen House is the only known 18th century Dutch-American farmhouse that still exists in Brooklyn.

33. Green-Wood Cemetery

Copy Link
500 25th St
Brooklyn, NY 11232
(718) 210-3080
Visit Website

One of New York City’s most serene, beautiful green spaces also happens to be one of its most macabre. These days, Green-Wood is probably best known for its “famous residents”—the authors, politicians, and other New York notables who’ve chosen it as their final resting place.

34. Pepsi Cola Sign

Copy Link
4600 5th Street, NY
Queens, NY

The Pepsi-Cola sign, which is today a symbol of the Queens waterfront and a nod to Long Island City's industrial past, was built in 1936. It sat atop the Pepsi bottling plant in the neighborhood and finally attained landmark status in April 2016.

35. John William and Lydia Ann Bell Ahles House

Copy Link
39-26 213th St
Flushing, NY 11361

This house was constructed in 1873 by farmer Robert M. Bell and remained within the family up until 1940s.

36. 57 Sullivan Street

Copy Link
57 Sullivan St
New York, NY 10012

This rare Federal style townhouse dates back to 1816. It has since undergone a restoration that replaced doors, windows, and ironwork while preserving its original facade.

37. William H. Schofield House

Copy Link
65 Schofield St
Bronx, NY 10464

One of the first families to settle in City Island back in 1827 was the William Schofield family, making this Italianate style farmhouse, constructed in 1860, their home. One of its most noteworthy features is its lengthy front porch.

38. St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Parish House, and Rectory

Copy Link
201 W 99th St
New York, NY 10025

Designed by Robert W. Gibson, this church is known for its Tiffany windows alongside its massive structure.

39. Vanderbilt Mausoleum

Copy Link
2205 Richmond Rd
Staten Island, NY 10306

This Romanesque Revival style cemetery is one of the few surviving works of architect Richard Morris Hunt in New York City.

40. Park Slope Historic District Extension II

Copy Link
Flickr/Lucia

The Park Slope neighborhood located west of Prospect Park an bounded by Flatbush Avenue to the north became one of the city's newest historic districts.

41. East New York Savings Bank Building

Copy Link
1117 Eastern Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11213

Built between 1927 and 1928, the East New York Savings Bank was designed architects Holmes & Winslow and was said to be one of the "most architecturally ambitious buildings."

1. Bergdorf Goodman

754 5th Ave, New York, NY 10019

The Modern Classicist building was designed by Buckman & Kahn and built from 1927-28. While its landmarking was previously backed by Borough President Gale Brewer, it was opposed by the building’s owners. On December 13th, the building finally obtained landmark status.

754 5th Ave
New York, NY 10019

2. 183-185 Broadway

183 Broadway, Brooklyn, NY 11211

This Italianate building is catty corner from Peter Luger and across the street from the Williamsburgh Savings Bank. The site is now occupied in part by Capital One Bank.

183 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11211

3. United Palace Theatre

4140 Broadway, New York, NY 10033

Now the United Palace, the Hindu-Islamic style theater was designed by Thomas W. Lamb and built in 1929-30. The commission noted that the building “exemplifies the American movie palace at its most monumental and spectacular.”

4140 Broadway
New York, NY 10033

4. Harlem YMCA

180 W 135th St, New York, NY 10030

The LPC lauded Harlem’s YMCA at 181 West 135th Street, also known as the Jackie Robinson YMCA Youth Center, for its “significant role in shaping the civic and artistic culture of Harlem.”

180 W 135th St
New York, NY 10030

5. Saint Barbara's Roman Catholic Church

138 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 11221

A Spanish Baroque Revival style building characterized by the LPC as “one of the most unusual and distinctive ecclesiastical buildings in New York City.” It’s designed by the same architect behind the Prospect Park boathouse and dates to 1910.

138 Bleecker Street
New York, NY 11221

6. Lakeman-Cortelyou-Taylor House

2286 Richmond Rd, Staten Island, NY 10306

The Dutch Colonial house with an 18th-century addition dates to about 1683 to 1714.

2286 Richmond Rd
Staten Island, NY 10306

7. 412 East 85th Street

412 E 85th St, New York, NY 10028

This Upper East Side house was built before 1861. Its one of only six pre-Civil War wood-frame houses that remain in the neighborhood.

412 E 85th St
New York, NY 10028

8. The Brougham Cottage

4176 Amboy Rd, Staten Island, NY 10308

This Vernacular style house on Staten Island dates to the early 18th century. The LPC deemed it "a remarkable survivor of Staten Island’s rural past."

4176 Amboy Rd
Staten Island, NY 10308

9. Excelsior Steam Power Company Building

33 Gold St, New York, NY 10038

The Excelsior Steam Power Company Building, a Romanesque Revival building at 33-43 Gold Street, dates to the mid- to late-1800s. It provided lighting and power to local factories and office buildings. It’s since been renovated for residential use.

33 Gold St
New York, NY 10038

10. Bowne Street Community Church

143-11 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY 11354

The Romanesque Revival style church was built in the early 1890s and sports stained glass windows by the Tiffany Glass Co. of New York.

143-11 Roosevelt Ave
Flushing, NY 11354

11. Sullivan-Thompson Historic District

New York, NY 10012

The Sullivan-Thompson Historic District was designated not only for its aesthetic contribution to New York City, but also its cultural and historical impact. The area includes a collection of tenement buildings and historic storefronts that preservationists say speak to the Italian immigrant experience in late 19th- and early 20th-century New York City.

12. 601 Lexington Avenue

601 Lexington Ave (Citigroup Center), New York, NY 10022

The former Citicorp Center, now known simply as 601 Lexington Avenue, is the newest site within Midtown East to get landmark status. The building was designed by Hugh A. Stubbins & Associates and built from 1973 to 1978 and has a few distinctive features, including its 45-degree angular roof, and its base of four stilt-like columns.

601 Lexington Ave (Citigroup Center)
New York, NY 10022

13. Martin Erdmann Residence

57 E 55th St, New York, NY 10022

Built from 1908 to 1909, the Martin Erdmann house is an English Renaissance Revival style home designed by architectural firm Taylor & Levi. Its unique design has withstood the test of time and remained intact.

57 E 55th St
New York, NY 10022

14. Graybar Building

420 Lexington Ave, Ste 2500, New York, NY 10170

The Graybar Building was completed in 1927 as part of an East Midtown development project known as "Terminal City" when transit improvements spurred new construction in the area. The building is one of 12 that were granted landmark status to protect from potential rezoning in the area known as Greater Midtown East.

420 Lexington Ave, Ste 2500
New York, NY 10170

15. The Benjamin Hotel

125 East 50th Street, New York, NY 10022

Emery Roth-designed hotel The Benjamin was built in 1925 and was once known as The Beverly. Its distinctive profile includes animal sculptures, Romanesque motifs, and several craftily designed setbacks.

125 East 50th Street
New York, NY 10022

16. Pershing Square Building

125 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017

The Pershing Square Building was finally landmarked, much to the chagrin of transportation advocates who argued that preserving it would hinder vital infrastructural improvements that are required to provide better accessibility to the subway. Nevertheless, the site achieved landmark status in November.

125 Park Ave
New York, NY 10017

17. Shelton Hotel/Halloran House

252 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

This 31-story Romanesque Revival style building was designed by architect Arthur Loomis Harmon and completed in 1923, embracing the 1916 Zoning Law that required setbacks on city skyscrapers.

252 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10016

18. 400 Madison Avenue

400 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10017

Occupying an entire block along Madison Avenue between 47th and 48th streets, this Neo-Gothic style structure was designed by architect H. Craig Severance and has recently undergone restoration work to its terracotta facade.

400 Madison Ave
New York, NY 10017

19. Minnie E. Young Residence

19 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022

One of the earliest works from prominent architectural firm Hiss & Weeks was this Renaissance Revival style townhouse built from 1899 to 1900. In 1962, the site became headquarters for the Kenneth Beauty Salon, where star clients included Jacqueline Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, and Katharine Graham.

19 E 54th St
New York, NY 10022

20. Yale Club of New York City

50 Vanderbilt Ave, New York, NY 10017

Designed by James Gamble Rogers in 1915, this is yet another building that was landmarked just in time to protect it from Midtown East rezoning.

50 Vanderbilt Ave
New York, NY 10017

21. Hampton Shops Building

20 E 50th St, New York, NY 10022

Architects Rouse & Goldstone and Joseph Steinman designed this 11-story building in a style that was unique for its time. The building was constructed between 1915 and 1916 and sits across the street from the iconic St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

20 E 50th St
New York, NY 10022

22. 18 East 41st Street

18 E 41st St, New York, NY 10017

The facade of this 21-story building is ornamented with blue, beige, and white terracotta and is the work of architects George & Edward Blum. The base has been “respectfully modified,” but the building’s unique arches and angles remain in place.

18 E 41st St
New York, NY 10017

23. Williamsburgh Trust Company Building

177 S 5th St, Brooklyn, NY 11211

This former financial hub was completed in 1906 after being designed by architects Helmle, Huberty & Hudswell. In 1961, the building was converted into a church for the Holy Ukrainian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in Exile.

177 S 5th St
Brooklyn, NY 11211

24. The Former Firehouse, Engine Company 29

160 Chambers St, New York, NY 10007

Built in 1832-33 as a three-story residence, the Former Firehouse, Engine Company 29, is one of the city’s earliest surviving structures of its kind.

160 Chambers St
New York, NY 10007

25. 315 Broadway

New York, NY

This five-story Italianate style building was constructed in 1861 and still has its original facade fully intact.

26. 92 Harrison Street House

92 Harrison St, Staten Island, NY 10304

In June, the LPC designated this Greek Revival style house a city landmark due to its unique features and characteristics.

92 Harrison St
Staten Island, NY 10304

27. Prince's Bay Lighthouse Complex

6204 Hylan Blvd, Staten Island, NY 10309

The LPC declared the two-and-a-half story house at 6204 Hylan Boulevard and the land on which it’s situated a city landmark back in June. It is Staten Island’s second oldest lighthouse.

6204 Hylan Blvd
Staten Island, NY 10309

28. St. John's Episcopal Church

1333 Bay St, Staten Island, NY 10305

This Gothic Revival style church was finally cleared from the LPC's Backlog Initiative and declared a city landmark in June.

1333 Bay St
Staten Island, NY 10305

29. George William and Anna Curtis House

234 Bard Ave, Staten Island, NY 10310

Abolitionist and literary figure George William Curtis and his wife once called this Italianate style house in Staten Island home. The house served a vital role as a place of gathering for prominent leaders of social movements, politics, and art.

234 Bard Ave
Staten Island, NY 10310

30. Church of St. Joseph of the Holy Family (R.C.)

405 W 125th St, New York, NY 10027

St. Joseph of the Holy Family Roman Catholic Church at 405 West 125th Street prides itself on being "the oldest existing church in Harlem and above 44th Street in Manhattan."

405 W 125th St
New York, NY 10027

31. Parish of St. Paul and Holy Rosary

121 E 117th St, New York, NY 10035

St. Paul Roman Catholic Church was built in 1908 and became a landmark over the summer.

121 E 117th St
New York, NY 10035

32. Van Sicklen House

27 Gravesend Neck Rd, Brooklyn, NY 11223

The Lady Moody-Van Sicklen House is the only known 18th century Dutch-American farmhouse that still exists in Brooklyn.

27 Gravesend Neck Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11223

33. Green-Wood Cemetery

500 25th St, Brooklyn, NY 11232

One of New York City’s most serene, beautiful green spaces also happens to be one of its most macabre. These days, Green-Wood is probably best known for its “famous residents”—the authors, politicians, and other New York notables who’ve chosen it as their final resting place.

500 25th St
Brooklyn, NY 11232

34. Pepsi Cola Sign

4600 5th Street, NY, Queens, NY

The Pepsi-Cola sign, which is today a symbol of the Queens waterfront and a nod to Long Island City's industrial past, was built in 1936. It sat atop the Pepsi bottling plant in the neighborhood and finally attained landmark status in April 2016.

4600 5th Street, NY
Queens, NY

35. John William and Lydia Ann Bell Ahles House

39-26 213th St, Flushing, NY 11361

This house was constructed in 1873 by farmer Robert M. Bell and remained within the family up until 1940s.

39-26 213th St
Flushing, NY 11361

36. 57 Sullivan Street

57 Sullivan St, New York, NY 10012

This rare Federal style townhouse dates back to 1816. It has since undergone a restoration that replaced doors, windows, and ironwork while preserving its original facade.

57 Sullivan St
New York, NY 10012

37. William H. Schofield House

65 Schofield St, Bronx, NY 10464

One of the first families to settle in City Island back in 1827 was the William Schofield family, making this Italianate style farmhouse, constructed in 1860, their home. One of its most noteworthy features is its lengthy front porch.

65 Schofield St
Bronx, NY 10464

38. St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Parish House, and Rectory

201 W 99th St, New York, NY 10025

Designed by Robert W. Gibson, this church is known for its Tiffany windows alongside its massive structure.

201 W 99th St
New York, NY 10025

39. Vanderbilt Mausoleum

2205 Richmond Rd, Staten Island, NY 10306

This Romanesque Revival style cemetery is one of the few surviving works of architect Richard Morris Hunt in New York City.

2205 Richmond Rd
Staten Island, NY 10306

40. Park Slope Historic District Extension II

Brooklyn, NY 11215

The Park Slope neighborhood located west of Prospect Park an bounded by Flatbush Avenue to the north became one of the city's newest historic districts.

41. East New York Savings Bank Building

1117 Eastern Pkwy, Brooklyn, NY 11213

Built between 1927 and 1928, the East New York Savings Bank was designed architects Holmes & Winslow and was said to be one of the "most architecturally ambitious buildings."

1117 Eastern Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11213