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Mapping the NYC buildings that became landmarks in 2017

Meet all of New York City's newest landmarks

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It's time to make up a bunch of awards and hand them out to the most deserving people, places and things in the real estate, architecture and neighborhood universes of New York City! Yep, it's time for the 14th Annual Curbed Awards! Up now: every single NYC landmark designated this year.

It was a banner year for historic New York City sites this year: the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to designate 14 new landmarks, representing a diverse range of architectural styles and cultural significance.

Though interior landmarks are a rarity in NYC—there are only 120 of them at present—the LPC added three new sites to that number this year: the Ambassador Grill interiors at the United Nations Hotel, several interior portions of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, and the iconic Rose Main Reading Room and Bill Blass Catalog Room at the New York Public Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman building.

This year, the LPC also took a step toward recognizing cultural importance rather than just architectural merit—Willem and Elaine de Kooning’s former home and studio near Union Square is a perfect example.

No matter what kind of architectural styles you prefer, there’s a lot to love about the LPC’s picks this year. Here now, a map of the 14 sites the Commission declared NYC landmarks this year.

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1. One UN New York Hotel, Ambassador Grill Interiors

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One United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017
(212) 758-1234
Visit Website

The first site to be declared a landmark in 2017 was a postmodern icon designed by Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates. When the owners of the One UN New York Hotel decided to change up the glitzy interiors of the hotel’s lobby and the Ambassador Grill, preservationists called on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to protect the space, and so they did on January 17. The disco-era interiors became New York’s 118th interior landmark.

2. People’s Trust Company Building

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181 Montague St
Brooklyn, NY 11201

The neoclassical building at 181 Montague Street is currently home to a Citibank branch, but it was originally built at the turn of the century for the People’s Trust Company. The LPC declared it an individual landmark on January 24, completing the recognition given to a set of financial institutions in this part of Brooklyn Heights that speak to the neighborhood’s commercial history.

PropertyShark

3. National Title Guaranty Company Building

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185 Montague St
Brooklyn, NY 11201

The LPC also landmarked an Art Deco skyscraper at 185 Montague Street on January 24. Built around 1929, the building was designed by Corbett, Harrison & MacMurray, one of the architecture firms involved in the creation of the Rockefeller Center. LPC Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan described the two buildings together as “striking examples of the optimistic architecture of their times—one looking to the past to convey stability and reliability, and one looking to future growth and success.”

185 Montague Street is the taller of the two structures.
Via PropertyShark

4. The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine

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1047 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10025
(212) 316-7540
Visit Website

Preservationists campaigned for years to have this 120-year-old church landmarked before the LPC finally decided to designate it in February. A previous decision to landmark this Upper West Side church was overturned by the City Council in 2002 because it did not include the entire Cathedral Close complex. This time around, the designation encompasses the cathedral, and six other surrounding buildings. Commissioner Adi Shamir-Baron said of this unfinished structure: “We’re recognizing not only what it was but what it will become. That says something about the potential open-endedness of preservation.”

Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images

5. Waldorf Astoria New York Interiors

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301 Park Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 355-3000
Visit Website

When the Waldorf Astoria was purchased by the Anbang for a partial condo conversion, preservationists feared that the building’s iconic Art Deco interiors would be lost. Thankfully, the developer agreed to work with the LPC last year, which ultimately culminated in the interiors’ designation in March, just a week after it shuttered for a three-year renovation. The protected spaces include the West Lounge, formerly known as Peacock Alley, which is located on the first floor; the Grand Ballroom and balconies on the third floor; the Park Avenue lobby, with its 13 murals and a floor mosaic designed by French artist Louis Rigal; and the foyer that connects the Jade Gallery and the Astor Gallery.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

6. Rose Main Reading Room & Bill Blass Catalog Room

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476 5th Ave
New York, NY 10018
(917) 275-6975
Visit Website

The designation of the New York Public Library’s Rose Main Reading Room and Bill Blass Catalog Room was long overdue, but the LPC finally gave the two grand rooms landmark status in August. The designation followed a major, two-year restoration process that ended in October 2016. Both rooms are located at the NYPL’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, and Srinivasan hailed the landmarking effort as an “outstanding public benefit to all New Yorkers.”

7. The Old Saint James Episcopal Church

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84-07 Broadway
Flushing, NY 11373

The oldest remaining Church of England mission church in New York City was designated a landmark in September. The 282-year-old church in Elmhurst, Queens, also happens to be the second-oldest religious building in the city, and was built between 1735-1736. While the church that now owns the building supported designation, they also raised concerns about the increased expenditure from such a designation. The church plans to offset these costs by building a new structure behind the existing one, and adding gardens for the public.

Via Google Maps

8. The Salvation Army National and Territorial Headquarters

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120 W 14th St
New York, NY 10011

This Art Deco complex on West 14th Street was designed by Ralph Walker and declared a New York City landmark in October. The site includes two structures: an 11-story office building, and an adjacent four-story auditorium. The Salvation Army has occupied this complex since it was built for them in 1929. The complex is notable for the distinct recessed entrance portal on the auditorium building, the asymmetrical massing, and the complex’s brick and cast stone exterior.

Via Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

9. Peter P. and Rosa M. Huberty House

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1019 Bushwick Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11221

Architect Ulrich Huberty designed this house for his parents, Peter and Rosa Huberty, in 1900, but the Colonial Revival-style home has remained unchanged in the last 117 years. That, and other factors prompted the LPC to designate this lovely house in October. The designation was seen not just as a nod to the architectural beauty of the townhouse, but also as recognition of Huberty’s legacy in Brooklyn. Along with his firm, he designed many iconic Brooklyn structures like Hotel Bossert, the Williamsburgh Trust Company Building, and the Prospect Park Boathouse.

Via Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

10. 827-831 Broadway Buildings

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827 Broadway
New York, NY 10003

This was an unusual designation for the LPC as it was more of a nod to the building’s cultural significance than its architectural merits. These buildings near Union Square were the former home and studio of artists Willem and Elaine de Kooning, and several notable artists subsequently. The proposal to landmark the site was spearheaded by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, just as the structures were in danger of being demolished to make way for a 14-story office tower; ultimately preservationists prevailed.

Via Google Maps

11. The Stafford House

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95 Pell Pl
Bronx, NY 10464

The Stafford House on Bronx’s City Island is typical of a Sears “mail order” house, and was built in 1930. It was an “Osborne” model, which was featured in the company’s catalogues between 1919 and 1929. The LPC designated this unassuming house, along with another on the Island in November. This particular house was built for captain John H. Stafford, and his family lived there until 1991.

Via Christopher McBride/PropertyShark

12. The Samuel H. and Mary T. Booth House

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30 Centre St
Bronx, NY 10464

Built 30 years before the Stafford House, the Booth House was constructed during a six-year period between 1887 and 1893 by prolific City Island contractor Samuel Booth. It was designated on the same day as the Stafford House, and LPC chair Srinivasan said the houses together “represent the historical development of the island during the 19th and 20th centuries.” The Booth House is typical of the Stick style of architecture.

Via Christopher McBride/PropertyShark

13. The Empire State Dairy Company Buildings

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2840 Atlantic Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11207

As East New York underwent rezoning, preservationists feared that the neighborhood would lose some of its historic, industrial buildings as a result. At least in the case of the Empire State Dairy buildings, the LPC did not let that happen. A group of four buildings along Atlantic Avenue and Schenck Avenue was landmarked earlier this month. They were all built in the early part of the 20th century and were used for processing milk and making ice cream for several decades until they shuttered in the 1950s. “These are the most significant industrial buildings in East New York,” said Srinivasan.

Courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

14. IRT Powerhouse

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850 12th Ave
New York, NY 10019

The 113-year-old Beaux Arts building had been on the LPC’s radar for quite some time now. It was part of the backlog initiative, and earlier this month the LPC voted unanimously to landmark it. Designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White, the full-block structure on the West Side was built in 1904 to power the city’s Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) subway. At that time, it was capable of producing 100,000 horsepower, and was able to hold more than 30 million pounds of coal. Con Edison purchased it in 1959, and continues to operate it as an active powerhouse today.

Courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

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1. One UN New York Hotel, Ambassador Grill Interiors

One United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017

The first site to be declared a landmark in 2017 was a postmodern icon designed by Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates. When the owners of the One UN New York Hotel decided to change up the glitzy interiors of the hotel’s lobby and the Ambassador Grill, preservationists called on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to protect the space, and so they did on January 17. The disco-era interiors became New York’s 118th interior landmark.

One United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017

2. People’s Trust Company Building

181 Montague St, Brooklyn, NY 11201
PropertyShark

The neoclassical building at 181 Montague Street is currently home to a Citibank branch, but it was originally built at the turn of the century for the People’s Trust Company. The LPC declared it an individual landmark on January 24, completing the recognition given to a set of financial institutions in this part of Brooklyn Heights that speak to the neighborhood’s commercial history.

181 Montague St
Brooklyn, NY 11201

3. National Title Guaranty Company Building

185 Montague St, Brooklyn, NY 11201
185 Montague Street is the taller of the two structures.
Via PropertyShark

The LPC also landmarked an Art Deco skyscraper at 185 Montague Street on January 24. Built around 1929, the building was designed by Corbett, Harrison & MacMurray, one of the architecture firms involved in the creation of the Rockefeller Center. LPC Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan described the two buildings together as “striking examples of the optimistic architecture of their times—one looking to the past to convey stability and reliability, and one looking to future growth and success.”

185 Montague St
Brooklyn, NY 11201

4. The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine

1047 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10025
Grant Lamos IV / Getty Images

Preservationists campaigned for years to have this 120-year-old church landmarked before the LPC finally decided to designate it in February. A previous decision to landmark this Upper West Side church was overturned by the City Council in 2002 because it did not include the entire Cathedral Close complex. This time around, the designation encompasses the cathedral, and six other surrounding buildings. Commissioner Adi Shamir-Baron said of this unfinished structure: “We’re recognizing not only what it was but what it will become. That says something about the potential open-endedness of preservation.”

1047 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10025

5. Waldorf Astoria New York Interiors

301 Park Ave, New York, NY 10022
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When the Waldorf Astoria was purchased by the Anbang for a partial condo conversion, preservationists feared that the building’s iconic Art Deco interiors would be lost. Thankfully, the developer agreed to work with the LPC last year, which ultimately culminated in the interiors’ designation in March, just a week after it shuttered for a three-year renovation. The protected spaces include the West Lounge, formerly known as Peacock Alley, which is located on the first floor; the Grand Ballroom and balconies on the third floor; the Park Avenue lobby, with its 13 murals and a floor mosaic designed by French artist Louis Rigal; and the foyer that connects the Jade Gallery and the Astor Gallery.

301 Park Ave
New York, NY 10022

6. Rose Main Reading Room & Bill Blass Catalog Room

476 5th Ave, New York, NY 10018

The designation of the New York Public Library’s Rose Main Reading Room and Bill Blass Catalog Room was long overdue, but the LPC finally gave the two grand rooms landmark status in August. The designation followed a major, two-year restoration process that ended in October 2016. Both rooms are located at the NYPL’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, and Srinivasan hailed the landmarking effort as an “outstanding public benefit to all New Yorkers.”

476 5th Ave
New York, NY 10018

7. The Old Saint James Episcopal Church

84-07 Broadway, Flushing, NY 11373
Via Google Maps

The oldest remaining Church of England mission church in New York City was designated a landmark in September. The 282-year-old church in Elmhurst, Queens, also happens to be the second-oldest religious building in the city, and was built between 1735-1736. While the church that now owns the building supported designation, they also raised concerns about the increased expenditure from such a designation. The church plans to offset these costs by building a new structure behind the existing one, and adding gardens for the public.

84-07 Broadway
Flushing, NY 11373

8. The Salvation Army National and Territorial Headquarters

120 W 14th St, New York, NY 10011
Via Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

This Art Deco complex on West 14th Street was designed by Ralph Walker and declared a New York City landmark in October. The site includes two structures: an 11-story office building, and an adjacent four-story auditorium. The Salvation Army has occupied this complex since it was built for them in 1929. The complex is notable for the distinct recessed entrance portal on the auditorium building, the asymmetrical massing, and the complex’s brick and cast stone exterior.

120 W 14th St
New York, NY 10011

9. Peter P. and Rosa M. Huberty House

1019 Bushwick Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11221
Via Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

Architect Ulrich Huberty designed this house for his parents, Peter and Rosa Huberty, in 1900, but the Colonial Revival-style home has remained unchanged in the last 117 years. That, and other factors prompted the LPC to designate this lovely house in October. The designation was seen not just as a nod to the architectural beauty of the townhouse, but also as recognition of Huberty’s legacy in Brooklyn. Along with his firm, he designed many iconic Brooklyn structures like Hotel Bossert, the Williamsburgh Trust Company Building, and the Prospect Park Boathouse.

1019 Bushwick Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11221

10. 827-831 Broadway Buildings

827 Broadway, New York, NY 10003
Via Google Maps

This was an unusual designation for the LPC as it was more of a nod to the building’s cultural significance than its architectural merits. These buildings near Union Square were the former home and studio of artists Willem and Elaine de Kooning, and several notable artists subsequently. The proposal to landmark the site was spearheaded by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, just as the structures were in danger of being demolished to make way for a 14-story office tower; ultimately preservationists prevailed.

827 Broadway
New York, NY 10003

11. The Stafford House

95 Pell Pl, Bronx, NY 10464
Via Christopher McBride/PropertyShark

The Stafford House on Bronx’s City Island is typical of a Sears “mail order” house, and was built in 1930. It was an “Osborne” model, which was featured in the company’s catalogues between 1919 and 1929. The LPC designated this unassuming house, along with another on the Island in November. This particular house was built for captain John H. Stafford, and his family lived there until 1991.

95 Pell Pl
Bronx, NY 10464

12. The Samuel H. and Mary T. Booth House

30 Centre St, Bronx, NY 10464
Via Christopher McBride/PropertyShark

Built 30 years before the Stafford House, the Booth House was constructed during a six-year period between 1887 and 1893 by prolific City Island contractor Samuel Booth. It was designated on the same day as the Stafford House, and LPC chair Srinivasan said the houses together “represent the historical development of the island during the 19th and 20th centuries.” The Booth House is typical of the Stick style of architecture.

30 Centre St
Bronx, NY 10464

13. The Empire State Dairy Company Buildings

2840 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11207
Courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

As East New York underwent rezoning, preservationists feared that the neighborhood would lose some of its historic, industrial buildings as a result. At least in the case of the Empire State Dairy buildings, the LPC did not let that happen. A group of four buildings along Atlantic Avenue and Schenck Avenue was landmarked earlier this month. They were all built in the early part of the 20th century and were used for processing milk and making ice cream for several decades until they shuttered in the 1950s. “These are the most significant industrial buildings in East New York,” said Srinivasan.

2840 Atlantic Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11207

14. IRT Powerhouse

850 12th Ave, New York, NY 10019
Courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

The 113-year-old Beaux Arts building had been on the LPC’s radar for quite some time now. It was part of the backlog initiative, and earlier this month the LPC voted unanimously to landmark it. Designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White, the full-block structure on the West Side was built in 1904 to power the city’s Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) subway. At that time, it was capable of producing 100,000 horsepower, and was able to hold more than 30 million pounds of coal. Con Edison purchased it in 1959, and continues to operate it as an active powerhouse today.

850 12th Ave
New York, NY 10019