clock menu more-arrow no yes

Take a Walking Tour of Nine Must-See Buildings in Cobble Hill

View as Map

Welcome to the first installment of Neighborhood Tours, a new feature in which Curbed maps out architecturally interesting buildings and sites ripe for an exploratory weekend jaunt. First up: Cobble Hill. Have other areas you'd like to see covered? Let us know.

On a day-to-day basis it's easy to overlook the wonderful architectural history and details a neighborhood has to offer. Hopefully this map of a few of Cobble Hill's most interesting and beautiful buildings will help remind you to look beyond the routine stupor. From late 1800's merchant-built free standing mansions, to celebrity-owned town-homes, there's a lot to notice in this tree-rich 'hood. We've selected but nine of these buildings and sites to point out, although there are many more. Hey, it's Friday. The forecast is calling for a balmy 41-degrees tomorrow—prime strolling weather. If you're feeling so moved, lace up, check out these sites, and email us at tips@curbed.com to point out any other Cobble Hill favorites.


Special thanks to architectural historian Francis Morrone for his help and insight.
· An Architectural Guidebook to Brooklyn by Francis Morrone [BaN]
· An Architectural Tour of 24 Century-Old Buildings [Curbed]
· All Curbed Maps [Curbed]

Read More

1. 491 Henry Street

Copy Link
491 Henry Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231

This Federal Era freestanding home was built from 1844 to 1850 for George A. Jarvis, a merchant-grocer and self-made man. This Greek Revival home has undergone many incarnations—from single-family dwelling to multi-family dwelling to community center for neighboring Strong Place Church to single-family home again, more than likely with much in between. The building was lovingly restored before it was scooped up in early 2013 for $6.75 million by its current owner, founder of Rag & Bone, Marcus Wainwright. [Image via Brownstoner]

2. Tower and Home Buildings

Copy Link
431 Hicks Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Designed by Alfred Tredway White and built in 1879, the architecture of the 218-unit Tower and Home Buildings, now known as the Cobble Hill Towers, sought to remedy the squalid air quality and wretched living conditions born of late 1800's tenement life. The towers, built as worker housing, employed cross-ventilation, private courtyards, and exterior staircases. In 1879, the two-to-five-room apartments rented for $7.20 to $14.00 a month. Now-a-days, that roughly equates to $125 to $235.

3. Workingman's Cottages

Copy Link
12 Warren Place
Brooklyn, NY 11201

At Warren Street between Hicks and Henry streets is another Alfred Tredway White development for working-class people—the 34 Workingman's Cottages, erected in 1878, that create Warren Mews. Twenty six of the two-story buildings measure 11-and-a-half feet wide and 32 feet deep, with the endcap units being slightly larger at 16 feet wide. In 1878, an 11-and-a-half-foot-wide row-house rented for about $18 a month, or $300 these days. More recently, the homes sell for about $1.3 million.

4. 166 Amity Street

Copy Link
166 Amity Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

This townhouse was snatched up by native-Brooklynite crooner Norah Jones for a mean $4.9 million just over five years ago. Back in early 2010, Jones enraged a few preservation-saavvy neighbors when she added seven windows to the western wall of her home. Amongst some, the scandal became known as Window-gate.

5. Christ Church

Copy Link
320 Clinton Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231

Architectural historian and New York walking tour guru Francis Morrone regards Christ Church as "probably the most significant single building in Cobble Hill." The church was erected under the vision of Richard Upjohn, also responsible for the Trinity Church on Broadway and Wall Street, from 1841-1842. In 1916, the church was renovated and decorated with new stained-glass windows made by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Unfortunately, most (but not all!) of Tiffany's work was destroyed in a 1939 fire. In 1969, Christ Church gained Landmarked status. The church was subjected to extreme damage in Hurricane Sandy, and sits largely in disrepair today.

6. Cobble Hill Park

Copy Link
Clinton St
Brooklyn, NY 11231

Perhaps surprising to some, Cobble Hill Park was dedicated only in 1965. Prior to the award-winning park, two large houses occupied the site as well as the Second Unitarian Church designed by Jacob Wrey Mould. The park's southern border of Verandah Place is lined with carriage houses and stables built in the 1840's and 50's for the neighborhood's wealthy. No. 40 Verandah Place once housed beloved novelist Thomas Wolfe.[image via NYCParks]

7. The Dudley Memorial

Copy Link
110 Amity Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Constructed in 1902, this French Renaissance-style building designed by William C. Hough originally stood as nurses residence's for neighboring Long Island College Hospital. In the 1970's, The Lamm Institute for Developmental Disorders moved in, but has since relocated. LICH sold the building off in 2007. Not surprisingly, it has since brrn developed into three townhouse-style units. In January 2012, the first unit to hit the market was asking $3.85 million; that's $250,000 more than the developers paid for the building in the first place.

8. 22 Strong Place

Copy Link
22 Strong Place
Brooklyn, NY 11231

This early 1900's townhouse serves as home base on this side of the Atlantic for British novelist Martin Amis. Amis bought the property for $2.5 million in 2010.

9. Kane Street Synagogue

Copy Link
236 Kane Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231

This house of worship, built in 1856, originally served as a Church, but in 1905 became the Kane Street Synagogue and home of Congregation Baith Israel Anshei Emes, the the oldest continually functioning Jewish congregation in Cobble Hill. It is built in the Romanesque style, which was popular amongst Jewish congregations in the late 1800's.

Loading comments...

1. 491 Henry Street

491 Henry Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231

This Federal Era freestanding home was built from 1844 to 1850 for George A. Jarvis, a merchant-grocer and self-made man. This Greek Revival home has undergone many incarnations—from single-family dwelling to multi-family dwelling to community center for neighboring Strong Place Church to single-family home again, more than likely with much in between. The building was lovingly restored before it was scooped up in early 2013 for $6.75 million by its current owner, founder of Rag & Bone, Marcus Wainwright. [Image via Brownstoner]

491 Henry Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231

2. Tower and Home Buildings

431 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Designed by Alfred Tredway White and built in 1879, the architecture of the 218-unit Tower and Home Buildings, now known as the Cobble Hill Towers, sought to remedy the squalid air quality and wretched living conditions born of late 1800's tenement life. The towers, built as worker housing, employed cross-ventilation, private courtyards, and exterior staircases. In 1879, the two-to-five-room apartments rented for $7.20 to $14.00 a month. Now-a-days, that roughly equates to $125 to $235.

431 Hicks Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

3. Workingman's Cottages

12 Warren Place, Brooklyn, NY 11201

At Warren Street between Hicks and Henry streets is another Alfred Tredway White development for working-class people—the 34 Workingman's Cottages, erected in 1878, that create Warren Mews. Twenty six of the two-story buildings measure 11-and-a-half feet wide and 32 feet deep, with the endcap units being slightly larger at 16 feet wide. In 1878, an 11-and-a-half-foot-wide row-house rented for about $18 a month, or $300 these days. More recently, the homes sell for about $1.3 million.

12 Warren Place
Brooklyn, NY 11201

4. 166 Amity Street

166 Amity Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201

This townhouse was snatched up by native-Brooklynite crooner Norah Jones for a mean $4.9 million just over five years ago. Back in early 2010, Jones enraged a few preservation-saavvy neighbors when she added seven windows to the western wall of her home. Amongst some, the scandal became known as Window-gate.

166 Amity Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

5. Christ Church

320 Clinton Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231

Architectural historian and New York walking tour guru Francis Morrone regards Christ Church as "probably the most significant single building in Cobble Hill." The church was erected under the vision of Richard Upjohn, also responsible for the Trinity Church on Broadway and Wall Street, from 1841-1842. In 1916, the church was renovated and decorated with new stained-glass windows made by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Unfortunately, most (but not all!) of Tiffany's work was destroyed in a 1939 fire. In 1969, Christ Church gained Landmarked status. The church was subjected to extreme damage in Hurricane Sandy, and sits largely in disrepair today.

320 Clinton Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231

6. Cobble Hill Park

Clinton St, Brooklyn, NY 11231

Perhaps surprising to some, Cobble Hill Park was dedicated only in 1965. Prior to the award-winning park, two large houses occupied the site as well as the Second Unitarian Church designed by Jacob Wrey Mould. The park's southern border of Verandah Place is lined with carriage houses and stables built in the 1840's and 50's for the neighborhood's wealthy. No. 40 Verandah Place once housed beloved novelist Thomas Wolfe.[image via NYCParks]

Clinton St
Brooklyn, NY 11231

7. The Dudley Memorial

110 Amity Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Constructed in 1902, this French Renaissance-style building designed by William C. Hough originally stood as nurses residence's for neighboring Long Island College Hospital. In the 1970's, The Lamm Institute for Developmental Disorders moved in, but has since relocated. LICH sold the building off in 2007. Not surprisingly, it has since brrn developed into three townhouse-style units. In January 2012, the first unit to hit the market was asking $3.85 million; that's $250,000 more than the developers paid for the building in the first place.

110 Amity Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

8. 22 Strong Place

22 Strong Place, Brooklyn, NY 11231

This early 1900's townhouse serves as home base on this side of the Atlantic for British novelist Martin Amis. Amis bought the property for $2.5 million in 2010.

22 Strong Place
Brooklyn, NY 11231

9. Kane Street Synagogue

236 Kane Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231

This house of worship, built in 1856, originally served as a Church, but in 1905 became the Kane Street Synagogue and home of Congregation Baith Israel Anshei Emes, the the oldest continually functioning Jewish congregation in Cobble Hill. It is built in the Romanesque style, which was popular amongst Jewish congregations in the late 1800's.

236 Kane Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231