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The 10 Cheapest Apartments for Sale on the Upper East Side

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The Upper East Side has plenty to offer at the tippy-top of the New York City real estate market?claiming, for example, many of the most expensive sales of 2012. But what about the lower end of the market? We dove into the StreetEasy listings for the neighborhood to come up with the Upper East Side's 10 cheapest apartments for sale. Not surprisingly, they're all studios. (We left out income-restricted units.) Here now, all 10 on one map.


· Mapping the 20 Most Expensive Sales of 2012 [Curbed]
· Top 10s [Curbed]

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333 East 85th Street #2D

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This 330-square-foot unit is on the second floor of a four-story walk-up building and is available as an investment opportunity. The $242,500 pad rents for an average of $1,300 to $1,600/month, according to the listing. The maintenance is $648/month, so there's a small margin for profit with a decent down payment.

220 East 87th Street #3E

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The kitchen and bathroom in this $239,000 studio are "just waiting for you to put your personal stamp on it to make it uniquely yours." In other words, some fixing up will be needed.

444 East 87th Street #5H

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This apartment has a renovated kitchen and "updated" bathroom, which since it's a studio, basically means the whole thing has been upgraded. The ask is $229,000 with a maintenance of $934/month.

252 East 89th Street #2D

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This $229,000 studio (maintenance: $816/month) is newly renovated, according to the brokerbabble. The listing photos don't excite, but perhaps it's just a case of ill-fitting furniture.

217 East 89th Street #A

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This studio, virtually staged in the listing photos, seeks $225,000, plus maintenance of $617/month. Pieds-a-terre and investors aren't welcome, but full-time residents at least get access to the building's common garden.

509 East 88th Street #3A

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The low price on this one -- $219,500 (maintenance: $637/month) -- might have something to do with the fact that the property is a short sale. There's an already-installed but "easily removed" Murphy bed, and pied-a-terres are totally okay.

175 East 93rd Street #1A

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A mere $215,000 will get a buyer this studio, with an unusually low maintenance charge of $505/month. The catch: the listing shows only a building exterior pic, which has us thinking some major repairs are in order.

246 East 90th Street #5D

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The listing prose and StreetEasy disagree about whether this one's a studio or a 1BR, but it's a 600-square-footer that can be a pied-a-terre with board approval. Regardless of its use, it needs a little upgrading. The ask: $210,000, with a maintenance of $714/month.

103 East 84th Street PHE

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This 300-square-foot co-op is seeking $192,000, plus a monthly maintenance of $1,716. It has "custom ship-like built-ins," just to make the owner even more conscious of living in a really, really tiny space.

103 East 84th Street PHD

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The private storage unit that comes with this $125,000 penthouse probably doubles its size. The listing acknowledges that the place is a fixer-upper and that the monthly maintenance charge (listed on StreetEasy as $1,802 and in the brokerbabble as $1,717) is rather ridiculous. A purchase also requires a 50 percent down payment and a 2 percent flip tax paid by the buyer. So, uh, good investment?

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333 East 85th Street #2D

This 330-square-foot unit is on the second floor of a four-story walk-up building and is available as an investment opportunity. The $242,500 pad rents for an average of $1,300 to $1,600/month, according to the listing. The maintenance is $648/month, so there's a small margin for profit with a decent down payment.

220 East 87th Street #3E

The kitchen and bathroom in this $239,000 studio are "just waiting for you to put your personal stamp on it to make it uniquely yours." In other words, some fixing up will be needed.

444 East 87th Street #5H

This apartment has a renovated kitchen and "updated" bathroom, which since it's a studio, basically means the whole thing has been upgraded. The ask is $229,000 with a maintenance of $934/month.

252 East 89th Street #2D

This $229,000 studio (maintenance: $816/month) is newly renovated, according to the brokerbabble. The listing photos don't excite, but perhaps it's just a case of ill-fitting furniture.

217 East 89th Street #A

This studio, virtually staged in the listing photos, seeks $225,000, plus maintenance of $617/month. Pieds-a-terre and investors aren't welcome, but full-time residents at least get access to the building's common garden.

509 East 88th Street #3A

The low price on this one -- $219,500 (maintenance: $637/month) -- might have something to do with the fact that the property is a short sale. There's an already-installed but "easily removed" Murphy bed, and pied-a-terres are totally okay.

175 East 93rd Street #1A

A mere $215,000 will get a buyer this studio, with an unusually low maintenance charge of $505/month. The catch: the listing shows only a building exterior pic, which has us thinking some major repairs are in order.

246 East 90th Street #5D

The listing prose and StreetEasy disagree about whether this one's a studio or a 1BR, but it's a 600-square-footer that can be a pied-a-terre with board approval. Regardless of its use, it needs a little upgrading. The ask: $210,000, with a maintenance of $714/month.

103 East 84th Street PHE

This 300-square-foot co-op is seeking $192,000, plus a monthly maintenance of $1,716. It has "custom ship-like built-ins," just to make the owner even more conscious of living in a really, really tiny space.

103 East 84th Street PHD

The private storage unit that comes with this $125,000 penthouse probably doubles its size. The listing acknowledges that the place is a fixer-upper and that the monthly maintenance charge (listed on StreetEasy as $1,802 and in the brokerbabble as $1,717) is rather ridiculous. A purchase also requires a 50 percent down payment and a 2 percent flip tax paid by the buyer. So, uh, good investment?